My place of work has been under constant renovation, an opportunity that I have had of salvaging very good wood that would have ended on a landfill otherwise. Since the workbench in my garage is full with my ever growing number of tools, I decided to build a second work area where I could continue to work on my projects. An idea of a mobile unit that served as a workbench and a tool cart came to my mind. I used everything that was available to me on my garage. The only thing that I bought for this project was a gallon of wood glue and a set of casters. I bought casters that can withstand 330 lbs (149.68 kg), the strongest that I could find. I bought the set of casters at a discount tool store but I realize that it is not always easy to find a good deal on them. You will also need long wood screws, 2 ½ or 3 inch long (63.5 or 76.2 mm).

Step 1: Building the top of the workbench

I started my project by reaping some 5 3/8 inch wide boards (136.52 mm) in half. The boards were given to me by a very good friend. I used a ¾ inch panel (19.05 mm) to build the top. After I cut the panel in half, I glued both halves together and kept some cinder blocks on top of this sandwich overnight. Next day I discovered that both halves did not exactly match, so I trimmed the edges with my circular saw, at the same time removing the unsightly beads of dry glue that oozed out.
<p>Nice. I like the fact that it fits &quot;me&quot;. It is as high as I want it so as to feel comfortable when using it to work off of. And, the big bonus, you can probably build this thing with stuff around the house. Probably dont have to buy anything. Maybe some wheels(casters) or something. But yea, I give it a big thumbs up!</p>
<p>Thank you!</p>
Nice project and you make a very valuable point, which not all repurposers remember to highlight, viz that we are not only saving money and resources but also saving communities from using more and more valuable land for permanently polluting landfill. Great job! Thanks for posting, Organikmechanic aka Andy
Nice Job! <br> <br>couple comments <br>when you cut plywood with a circular saw &amp; saw horses, it helps to put scrap 2x4's between the sawhorses, perpindicular to the cut @ roughy 1 foot on center. Set your ply on that. set your blade depth to a little more than plywood. then when you cut, both sides of the plywood are fully supported and won't drop on you, which can be dangerous. <br> <br>to late here, but for future projects you may consider not glueing the plywood together. put a 1x2 edge, that is only screwed to the bottom layer. When you attach the edging clamp the plywood together and make sure the edging aligns with the top layer. the bottom plywood can be screwed to the frame. no need for pocket joints. top plywood is simply set in. when the top gets banged up you can pop it out and drop a new one in.
Thank you for the suggestions!
Nice work bench! <br> <br>I like the Flow reference in your author line. You managed to condense the entire book into one sentence. Well done! (I really connected with the Flow idea, but man that book dragged on forever.)
Thank you. I have read two books about flow and, each time I read myself to sleep!
looks like a great use of salvaged wood

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