Instructables

Monocarbon arc torch V.2010 (Soplete de arco de un carb�n, V.2010)

NOTE: Finally I make this other torch. December 29, 2010.

Esta es una mejora significativa de la primera versión. Es más económica, más fácil de hacer y más segura. Esta herramienta es ideal para calentar al rojo blanco piezas pequeñas (y no tanto) de hierro, a efectos de forjarlas, templarlas o fundirlas. Funciona solamente con una soldadora eléctrica, y es casi como un soplete de acetileno, aunque más sucia y peligrosa que este. Con ella se pueden hacer cosas que con el electrodo normal de soldar sería imposible.

This is a significant improvement of the first version. It is more economical, easier to do and more secure. This tool is ideal for heating white-hot small (and not so) iron parts, in order to forge, temper or melt them. It  is only for use with an electric welder. It functions like an acetylene torch, but much more dirty and dangerous, and only for medium sized pieces. It serves to make some things that the iron electrode can't make

 
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Step 1: Material (material)

Dado que los únicos electrodos de carbón que puedo conseguir son los carbones de pilas comunes, tuve que conseguir un caño de cobre con un diámetro interno similar al de dichos carbones.

Since the only carbon electrodes that I can get are the common batteries carbons, I had to get a copper pipe with an inner diameter similar to that of such carbons.

Step 2: Cortando y aplastando (cutting and flattening)

Corté un trozo de ese caño de cobre, unos 3 cm más largo que el carbón de la pila. Luego le hice un corte longitudinal para que el carbón pudiera entrar fácilmente, y para poder apretarlo con una abrazadera. Aplasté el otro extremo del tubo de cobre.

I cut a piece of that copper pipe, about 3 cm longer than the battery carbon. Then I made it a longitudinal cut so the carbon could enter easily, and be able to tighten it with a clamp. I flatten the other end of the copper pipe.

soundmotor3 years ago
rimar2000,

Have you tried fuse-welding with this torch? What I mean is to place 2 pieces of thin (~16 gauge) sheet steel together, strike the arc, then run it along the steel edges to fuse them together. You can do this with a TIG welder, can yours do it as well? With white-hot heat, it seems like you might be able to.
Mr.Sanchez3 years ago
Eureka ...he utilizado este metodo para soldar pequeños puntos de soldadura desde hace muchos años...tu me aclaraste muchas dudas pero quisiera me aclararas una mas: Es posible construir un equipo pequeño que funcione con los nodulos de carbón Y que utilice menos amperaje....?
Gracias.
rimar2000 (author)  Mr.Sanchez3 years ago
Hay varios instructables al respecto, buscá WELD o WELDING. Yo tengo muy poca experiencia como soldador, para mí soldar es más un arte que una técnica. Me conformo con que mis soldaduras queden fuertes, porque linda todavía no me ha salido ninguna. Lo que he notado es que el electrodo de carbón consume más corriente que el de hierro, porque la soldadora se recalentó dos o tres veces con pocos minutos de uso.

There are several instructive in this regard, search WELDING or WELD. I have very little experience as a welder, welding for me is more an art than a technique. I am satisfied if my welds are strong, because beautiful I have not any. What I noticed is that the carbon electrode consumes more power than that of iron, because welder overheated two or three times, within a few minutes of use.
Hi there Would u pls vote for my entry ...?
http://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Belt-No-sew/
thnks
rimar2000 (author)  Mr.Sanchez3 years ago
Voted!
Personalmente te recomiendo que utilices ese metodo para pequeños puntos a mi me funciona de maravilla para soldar laminas delgadas de aluminio Cobre o lamina Collroll, estoy trabajando en un instructivo al rspecto...Gracias por los Votos.
Personally I had used this welding method to weld littles point or welds, just a little touch and is Dones, i´m working in an ibles to Solve some Doubts.. Thanks for the Votes.
Ninzerbean3 years ago
Show us what you have made - I know nothing of arc welding so I don't know what you use it for. Is this a better version of what I can buy in the store? I have always wanted to learn to weld. I have an acetylene torch but it's only for small stuff.
You would probably enjoy this book.  It is by a woman for women who want to weld, especially decorative items.

What the author is doing here is running a high amperage electrical current through a piece of carbon rod to make a very hot arc that can be used to make metal very hot.  Once heated, it can be bent or shaped with a hammer.
Thank you!
if you had more money than i do and wat to get in arc welding i recomend a oxy ctylene toch kit ecpecial if you want to art weld u can cut bend weld braze silver solder i just a cheap 50 dollar 70 amp arc welder its ok for me because i dont have enough money for a torch kit and i dont use it for art pourposes iuse it for car repair making motorized bicycles and steel fabrication dont get mad at me i am not being sexist or any thing
Thank you, I think this is down the road for me for sure, and I would need to take a class to feel safe. I appreciate you telling me what you know.
you shold read this this book its called welding basics i learned stick welding by safety reading it and lots of practice and it has other types of welding mentioned in it too great books
you dont need class to learn how to weld. with stuff like oxyacetylene you will need to understand and follow the safety stuff and you can learn how o weld at home i learned how to arc weld at home and learned safety tips from professional welders and other ppl my dad knows all you need is confidence in that you can do it is pretty easy and if your in the usa ill go to harbour freight and get the portable torch kit for 279.99 it comes with cylinders and a storage tote every thing you need to get started you parobably want to talk to someone more experience in gas welding than i am and probably someone older than i am only 15
rimar2000 (author)  2 stroke 3 years ago
I live in Argentina. A year ago I bought a Gamma Turbo Jet 155 welder, plus mask and a pair of gloves, for US$ 54. Today it costs US$ 76. I use it for home repairs only. This month I made a ladder to climb into the water tank of the house, using old pipes that were lying on the backyard. Yesterday I welded the hinges to the door, for a friend neighbor. I did too some little accesories for my poor man's lathe
same her i got my 70 amp stick welder for 50 bucks i go the handheld mask but my dad bought me a autodarkning helmet it cost 75 now
rimar2000 (author)  Phil B3 years ago
Thanks, Phil. I was inspired on your instructable

rimar2000 (author)  Ninzerbean3 years ago
Sorry, I was a little silly by not explaining in detail the use of this tool. It is only for use with an electric welder. It functions like an acetylene torch, but much more dirty and dangerous, and only for medium sized pieces. It serves to make some things that the iron electrode can't make
kill-a-watt3 years ago
Can you extract the carbon electrodes from used batteries, thereby getting a double use out of them?

I'm going to try this, but it seems that (in the first and second worlds at least), you can get a pack of 50 "copper coated gouging carbon electrodes" for about US$25. It's a shame that you can't get a supplier to ship them  to Argentina.
rimar2000 (author)  kill-a-watt3 years ago
Perhaps my search was not good enough, but the fact is that I lost several hours walking around and could not find these electrodes. As you say, it is a shame, and sadly it is not the only shame that we argentines face in our beloved country (all countries have their "hiding corpse in the closet"). Obviously the copper coated electrodes are better than battery's carbon. I use my 150 Amps welder with the power controller near the top, but I don't know how many Amps that is. This tool is effective to melt iron.
Thanks, I've had issues myself ordering stuff I know exists, but I don't know the One True Name. I hope that helped. Then again, I don't want to discount the value of making something out of a used dry cell. Very resourceful. I've managed also to waste a tremendous amount of time - running around town - trying to track down a 5.5 mm deep well socket. It's a not too common size, but when you need it you need exactly that (or a 7/32" socket, but that's as hard to source too). Finally, I had it shipped to my door for USD$9 thanks to ebay. This is a very useful idea, as with a arc welder, you buy the fuel as you need it out of a wall socket. Using a gas torch for the very same tasks requires you to have a tank of O2 and Acetylene, on hand alt all times. More than likely you'll find yourself low on gas when the welding supply store is closed for the weekend.
rimar2000 (author)  kill-a-watt3 years ago
The truth is painful: I don't use the carbon from used batteries, because these big sizes are not common: I am in the sad need to have to destroy new batteries to extract its carbon! Regarding eBay, I appreciate your suggestion, but think that I live in Argentina, and to buy in USA is expensive and risky for me. It happened to me to lose $ 20 disappeared without notice from my PayPal account.
By the way, what amperage on the welder are you using for D-sized cells?