Introduction: Monopoly Wine Charms and Coasters

Replacing a worn board game missing pieces? Breathe new life into the old set and upcycle it into coasters and wine charms for game night!


Step 1: Charm Materials and Tools

Materials for the wine charms:
  • 8 Game pieces total. 6 player pieces + 1 house + 1 hotel.
  • 8 Wire Hoops, medium size.
  • 42 Beads.  6 beads were used on each charm, primary colors on the playing pieces and a mixture of color and silver "spacer beads" on the House and Hotel charms.
  • 3Eyepins 3/4" length. One for the Thimble, House and Hotel charms.
  • 5Jump rings, 7mm diameter.  2 rings for dog charm, one ring each for car, hat, and train charms.
  • Super glue.
Useful tools:

Step 2: Charms Construction

For the car, hat and train, the construction was straightforward.
  1. Drill a 3/64" hole to accommodate jump ring.
  2. Open jump ring, thread through hole and close.  Open the jump ring by bending the ends sideways.  Bending sideways allows easy pinch to close and does not deform the ring.
  3. Thread 3 beads onto hoop.
  4. Thread the charm onto the hoop.
  5. Thread the final 3 beads onto the hoop. 
  6. Bend the end of the hoop a little past 90 degrees (~100 degrees), creating a hook to hold the hoop closed with a little tension.

Step 3: Thimble Charm

The thimble charm's attachment is a bit difficult.  A hole centered on the thimbles top is the natural place.  However, the interior is too small to access with tools.  Solution- thread the eyepin from the inside-out.
  1. Drill 3/64" hole to accommodate the eyepin.
  2. Fold the eye of the eyepin over 90 degrees, forming a stop.
  3. Thread the eyepin through the thimble, inside-out.
  4. Pull snug with pliers.  Apply 5 minute epoxy inside the thimble, cementing the eye.  Hold tension while the epoxy hardens.  The cure time will be longer in the confined space.
  5. Using pliers, roll the protruding end of the eyepin into a helix.
  6. The helix can be collapsed into a new ring, similar to closing jump rings.  Cut the helix, leaving one complete turn.  Pinch together, forming a ring on the thimble's head.
  7. Bead and assemble same as basic charm.

Step 4: Dog Charm

A collar is a natural connection for the dog charm.  No drilling required, just an extra ring.
  1. Open a ring far enough to thread around dog's neck- the "collar".
  2. Thread a second, closed ring onto the collar.
  3. Close the collar.
  4. Finish the charm as usual.

Step 5: Boot Charm

The boot charm has a natural place for connection- the bootstrap.  Drill out to attach.
  1. Using the 3/64" bit, carefully drill out the bootstrap.  Work sideways to slowly clear the interior.
  2. Finish the charm the usual way.

Step 6: Home and Hotel Charms

An eyepin centered on the side of each piece makes a good connection.
  1. Cover the face with tape.
  2. Drill a 1/32" hole through the tape at least halfway into the playing piece.
  3. Insert the eyepin into the hole to estimate the length needed.  Cut the excess off the pin.
  4. Use wire cutters to gently score the eyepin's shaft.
  5. Squirt super glue along the shaft of the eyepin and insert into the charm.
  6. The excess epoxy will harden into a clump.  Carefully clean off using a razor blade. Remove the tape, leaving a tidy attachment.
  7. Finish the charms as usual.

Step 7: Coasters Materials and Tools

Materials for the coasters:
  • 8 Game property cards.
  • Roll of cork backing, ~12" by 24".
  • Felt fabric, same size as cork roll.
  • Silicone epoxy. Flexible, waterproof, bonds to fabric and wood.
  • Decoupage glue.
  • Wood glue.
  • Acrylic Varnish.
Useful tools:

Step 8: Coasters: Construction

The coasters construction is straight forward.
  1. Lay the property cards on disposable paper, face up.
  2. Paint several layers of decoupage glue over the cards.  Allow each layer to dry before applying the next.
  3. Arrange the cards on the rolled out cork board, estimating the amount of cork backings.  Plan a ~1/8" border on each card and allow further ~1/2" spacing between each card.
  4. Remove the cards and spread flexible epoxy over the required cork. Use a spatula to spread evenly.
  5. Press the felt onto the cork by hand.  Pile heavy books on the composite for several hours.
    • NOTE: many flexible epoxies cure by evaporation, the books will slow this down.
    • WARNING: follow the safety instructions of the epoxy to avoid dangerous vapors.
  6. Cut approximate backing for each card. 
  7. Adhere the cards to the cork with wood glue, press with heavy books while drying.
  8. Trim the borders of your coasters cleanly.
  9. Spray the coaster-tops with several layers of acrylic varnish, creating a non-tacky surface.

Step 9: Game On!

Enjoy your themed charms.  May upcycling bring you good luck next game night!

Comments

author
Dancing Kittens (author)2015-08-22

I happily skip away from your awesome project with 2 ideas that will help me out for a long time to come. 1 ~ the tape on the pliers, 2 ~ the tape/eyelet setting method. Thank you for including these steps. Brilliant. Simple. Beautiful. Thank you!

author
CrLz (author)Dancing Kittens2015-08-22

Cheers and cha-cha!

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author
Adambowker98 (author)2013-03-02

I am about to order some extra deeds right now to do the coasters! (I have some, but I like to play Monopoly with them :)

author
WhyHello (author)2010-12-31

lol the little one wont be happy about it X3 she loved monpoly (weird kid)

author
WALKEREN (author)2010-12-18

Fantastic! I bought a bunch of pieces last year to do this same project but couldn't see where to start....

Great job!

author
CrLz (author)WALKEREN2010-12-18

Cool! Love to see yours when finished.

author
tim_n (author)2010-12-16

Your board items look a lot better quality than the game producers make now, certainly in England. The last monopoly board I saw was made from cheap card and everything was plastic.

Yours looks pratically antique compared to the current offerings!

Good 'ible.

author
chello2k9 (author)tim_n2010-12-18

I think they sell different sets, the cheaper they are the more plastic they become. The more expensive they are they end up being gold plated pieces with real money. Some where in between a similar set to this exist.

author
CrLz (author)chello2k92010-12-18

Makes me wonder if there is a niche for 3D printing higher quality game pieces?

author
CrLz (author)tim_n2010-12-16

Thanks tim_n.

Plastic game pieces would be a real bummer, guess I'd keep the old and make charms out of the new in that case...

author
ChrysN (author)2010-12-15

Clever idea, they look great!

author
CrLz (author)ChrysN2010-12-15

Thanks!

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Bio: CrLz : Ideas, ideas and ideas - Love it when I get one hammered out and working. Seems like there is plenty of room for creativity, in ... More »
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