Introduction: Motorized Lazy Susan

Material list:
3/4 inch MDF
1/2 inch MDF
12v Motor
Bataries (6 AA whired in series)
Batterie holders
Wier (Black and Red)
Switch
Paint (pick a color you like but wight is the beast for photography)
Small pack of 1 inch screws

Tool list:
Drill
Drill bits
Jigsaw
Compas
Pen or pencil

Step 1: Cutting

First you need to daw a crucial,
Then Cut out the crucial using a jigsaw,
After you have done this you then need to sand down the edges so they are nice and smooth.

Step 2:

Drill small hole in the center of the top plate for the motor.
Use the shaft on your motor to find the correct size drill bit.

Step 3:

Cut a slot out of the 3/4 inch MDF and attach it to your bace to hold the motor.

Step 4: Paint

Next you are going to want to pant all the parts that are MDF.

Step 5: Wiring

Un fournatly the motor I had was broken and I was not able to finish the wiring. I was planning on using AA battery's wiered in series to make 12v for the motor, it was going to be switch so that I could easily turn it on and off.

Comments

author
mach1950 (author)2017-05-04

I think you would need a bearing surface better than the wood or the friction would be too much for that little motor.

author
Alex in NZ (author)mach19502017-05-07

You can buy some pretty thin lazy-susan bearings which aren't too expensive. This one for example. I've got no connection with the company other than as a customer, and I'm sure that there will be a similar firm handier for you. Unless you live in NZ, in which case the UK is easiest.

I have one of the 12" size (300mm) and it is strong enough to take my weight and turn freely (85kg, 190lbs, 14st according to taste).

author
Dylan Dunn (author)Alex in NZ2017-05-08

Yes I was thinking of using something like that but I was no sure how I could mount the motor to it.

author
Alex in NZ (author)Dylan Dunn2017-05-08

If you check out the Wikipedia on belt-drive turntables there is an image of a record player (gramophone :-) where the turntable is on a bearing, and the motor is offset from the centre of rotation. A rubber band goes around the motor shaft and then around either the outside of the turntable or around the outside of a smaller circle mounted underneath the turntable.

This give two benefits: the motor is offset, clearing room for the bearing, and the difference in diameter between your motor shaft (say 1/8", 3mm) and the turntable/drive-ring (say 8", 10cm) gives a "free" reduction gearbox which gives the motor the torque to drive the platter and gives the platter a slow speed so that its contents don't go flying.

You have to find a rubber band of the right size, and maintain it (see model aircraft circles for preservation tips). Some folk cut them from bicycle or car/truck inner tubes, so begging at the local garage might be fruitful?

Good luck with whatever you do :-)

author
Dylan Dunn (author)Alex in NZ2017-05-08

Ok thanks I'll have to look at that!

author
mach1950 (author)Alex in NZ2017-05-07

That looks perfect, just what I was thinking about. If the friction is low enough that gear motor will turn it all day with any amount of weight on it.

author
Dylan Dunn (author)mach19502017-05-08

Another way that I was thinking making it was with a gear system to make it easer on the motor but I was notable to make a gear that was uniform enough to spin smoothly

author
Swansong (author)2017-05-04

I'd love to have one of those on the table, that's a neat way to make one :)

About This Instructable

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Bio: I'm 16 and I love woodworking.
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