Instructables
Due to the nature of my work I tend to run slings pretty roughly and as a result, I tend to change them out relatively often. When my last sling started showing wear and tear, I patched it up and kept moving with it because I was just not going to spend $40 on another sling. It wasn't until my rifle completely came off the hook and made friends with the dirt that I decided that enough was enough and I needed a new sling. The search began.

Low price; quality; features - everything I came across was lacking in one of these traits and so the only choice left was to make my own. Besides, who knows more about what I want in a sling than me. I did my research, drew up a sketch, and ordered the components.

The result more than exceeded even my expectations! From setup to completion was about four hours, with plenty of learning in-between. I'm pretty confident though, that I could complete another one in under an hour.
 
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Step 1: Nuts & Bolts

Picture of Nuts & Bolts
Tools
• Rotary Cutter (or Scissors)
• Sewing Machine (or Hand Needles)
• Lighter
• Stapler
• Ruler
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Materials List
1.5" MultiCam Webbing - $10
1.5" D-Ring - $0.59
• 2 - 1.5" Triglides - $0.98
• 2 - 1.25" MASH Hooks - $6.50
• (optional) Heavy Duty Thread - $8.49
• (optional) Grip Tape - $9.99

Shipping & Handling = $6 (roughly)

Total Cost: $24.07 (or $42.55 w/ optional items)
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I went with plastic hardware but feel free to upgrade to sturdier metal ones.

There are some ways to bring the final price down if you're cost-conscious:

• Find what you can locally and save on shipping
• Use 1" webbing and matching size hardware
• Use webbing of a different color, MultiCam is expensive
• Buy a smaller spool of thread or use what you have lying around
• Instead of fancy grip tape - consider clear tape, or color duct tape
nathanwide1 year ago
Thanks a lot! Good idea to. I think I'll make one myself