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Hi,

In this tutorial I will show you how to use 74HC595 IC for increasing I/O Pins.It is 8-bit shift register.Multiplexing is a very efficient technique for controlling many components wired together in a matrix/array.This example is based on the 74HC595. The datasheet refers to the 74HC595 as an "8-bit serial-in, serial or parallel-out shift register with output latches; 3-state." In other words, you can use it to control 8 outputs at a time while only taking up a few pins on your microcontroller. You can link multiple registers together to extend your output even more.Source www.arduino.cc

Step 1: Things Required

We need :-

  • Linkit one
  • Breadboard
  • 74HC595 IC
  • Jumper wires
  • Some L.E.Ds for testing it

Step 2: Circuit

See the pictures for better clarity of what I've done with this IC.How this all works is through something called "synchronous serial communication," i.e. you can pulse one pin up and down thereby communicating a data byte to the register bit by bit. It's by pulsing second pin, the clock pin, that you delineate between bits. This is in contrast to using the "asynchronous serial communication" of the Serial.begin() function which relies on the sender and the receiver to be set independently to an agreed upon specified data rate. Once the whole byte is transmitted to the register the HIGH or LOW messages held in each bit get parceled out to each of the individual output pins. This is the "parallel output" part, having all the pins do what you want them to do all at once.

The "serial output" part of this component comes from its extra pin which can pass the serial information received from the microcontroller out again unchanged. This means you can transmit 16 bits in a row (2 bytes) and the first 8 will flow through the first register into the second register and be expressed there. You can learn to do that from the second example. "3 states" refers to the fact that you can set the output pins as either high, low or "high impedance." Unlike the HIGH and LOW states, you can"t set pins to their high impedance state individually. You can only set the whole chip together. This is a pretty specialized thing to do -- Think of an LED array that might need to be controlled by completely different microcontrollers depending on a specific mode setting built into your project. Neither example takes advantage of this feature and you won"t usually need to worry about getting a chip that has it.(Source : www.arduino.cc)

Step 3: Code

We will use ShiftOut in this.For more information check out this.The "serial output" part of this component comes from its extra pin which can pass the serial information received from the microcontroller out again unchanged. This means you can transmit 16 bits in a row (2 bytes) and the first 8 will flow through the first register into the second register and be expressed there.

Step 4: Done!!

We can use this in our parking sensor projects or any project dealing with this.

Best of luck for your projects!!

Thank you!!

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