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This is my very first commission piece, The brief was simple give it a new lease of life and make it cream. Which at the time seemed like a very big job, yet I knew all It needed was enthusiasm and lots and lots of sanding.

Step 1: Begin Sanding

This was by far the biggest part of the job but it was well worth the effort for the end result. I just needed to have a clear plan as it could take a long time if I didn't stick to it.

1. I wanted to get the big areas done first so I began to strip off all the varnish from the sides and top with 60 grit sandpaper on the belt sander, which didn't require much as most of the varnish had worn away.

2. I then repeated the process using 100 grit and 150 grit to get it nice and smooth.

3. The next step is the longest, I mean look at the detailed inlay on this piece. This required sanding a lot of it down with the orbital sander and by hand with paper using the same grades as the last step.

4. Ensure the entire surface is completely smooth and clean as when paint is applied any little mark will show up, this step is a pain but the more time that you put in the better result is achieved.

Step 2: Apply Primer & Paint

I wanted the piece to have smooth and matt finish, which is why I decided to give it a couple of coats using white filler primer spray paint and sand in between coats using 150 grit.

1. One 400ml can of spray was enough to do two coats, which after sanding with the 150 grit, I was really happy with the results as the filler primer had filled in any lumps and bumps that I had missed during sanding.

http://www.wilko.com/metal-and-specialist-paint/paint-surface-primer-white-matt-400ml-spray/invt/0413356

2. I then moved onto painting the piece with;

http://www.homebase.co.uk/en/homebaseuk/home-of-colour-just-one-coat-classic-cream---satin-paint---750ml-649381

3. Make sure to sand between each coat using P400 to keep it smooth, four coats were applied in total.

4. I applied two coats of varnish to protect the finish as I wanted to avoid changing the colour.

Step 3: Happy Client

I am really happy with the outcome of the piece and what is even better is to have a happy client. So I cant really give enough thanks for giving me the chance to prove myself.

It also feels good to give a new life and look to a tired old piece of furniture.

Would love to see any of your restoration pieces, and all comments are welcome.

Onto the next project.

<p>Very nice!</p><p>Would chemical strippers been easier to deal with since you have all that detail work to get into with sandpaper?</p><p>What is that device on the top wall? Tankless gas water heater or room heater? Haven't seen many of those in NYC.</p>
Thanks for the comment, I did consider chemical strippers but I have never used them before so was unsure what to use. Its a gas meter that you can see in the picture to monitor how much gas we have used, they are very common in the UK, especially in older houses. Thanks

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Bio: Amateur woodworker with a passion for all things creative.
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