Instructables

"N" Table - The N64 Logo End Table

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The Nintendo 64 or N64 was released in North America in 1996 and had so many amazing games such as "The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time", ""Super Smash Bros.", and "Golden Eye 007".

A few months ago I found the second picture on Facebook (if anyone knows the source of this picture, please post it in the comments). I thought to myself, "I could make that.". This was around the same time that I was looking for Christmas gifts for my family. I feel bad that in my haste to get this finished I missed taking pictures of a few steps. I hope that with my documentation we can fill in the blanks.
 
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Step 1: Supplies Needed

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  • 2 - 6x6x8 foot fence posts
  • 32 - 3 inch grabber screws
  • 1 - cheap 4 inch phillips screw driver (the handle will need to be cut short)
  • Wood Glue
  • 2 Cans Wood filler
  • 2 Cans Spray Paint (each color)
    • Primer
    • Blue
    • Green
    • Red
    • Yellow

Step 2: Cut and Plane Wood

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Cut wood to 4 lengths of 17 3/4 and 4 lengths of 19 3/4.

Plane wood from the 5.5 inches down to only 5 inches.

Of the boards that are 19 3/4 inches long, cut 45 degree angles on the ends. These will be the diagonal connecting lines as part of the "N".

***This is the step I didn't take a pictures of***

Drill 32 holes in total (8 in each diagonal piece) deep enough for the screws to hold the N together. 

Step 3: Assembly

Glue and assemble the eight pieces two at a time (a corner piece and diagonal piece). The reason you want to assemble it into four identical pieces is so that you can do as much of the assembly  using a drill and not have to use a screwdriver. 

Step 4: Fill Holes, Gaps and Sand

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Once it's fully assembled, check all of the joints. Anywhere that there is a gap, fill it. Fill all of the holes used for screws as well.

Sand everything smooth.
cpayne8yesterday
What did you use to cut the wood??
tomatoskins (author)  cpayne810 hours ago
Sadly I didn't have anything other than a hand saw that would work. It was a long night...
javles05031 month ago

This table is great, I actually got the supplies to make the table, but I messed up when I was cutting the 45 degree angle because I don't know where to start cutting the angle,the instructions were unclear to me and I was just wondering where to make the angle. Please reply as soon as you can.

tomatoskins (author)  javles05031 month ago
I wish that I currently had an answer for you. Because I gave away this table as a Christmas gift, it is not easily accessible to me. sadly it may be a few months till I have the opportunity to sit down with it and a tape measure. I wish that I currently had a better answer for you, but I promise that I will get back as soon as I do have an answer.

OK... I'm not trying to be a pain in the butt here because you obviously built this thing and I assume there was a tape measure involved at some point so maybe I'm just doing it wrong.

I always build projects in Sketchup first just so I get a "perfect world" idea of measurements and such, and this thing don't jive. If you were to build whats essentially a cube with 5 X 5 X 17 3/4" legs, then the angled pieces could not be 19 3/4" long or they would not reach the floor from the top of the leg. In the perfect world of Sketchup, the angled pieces would have to be 20 3/32". I know we're only talking about less than 3/8", but that adds up quickly as you work across 4 faces. So by the time you go all the way round, you'll be off by an inch and a half = lopsided table.

I guess my point is... How much "adjusting" did you have to do, if any?

kgrewe2 months ago

I like that this piece has gotten around. I made an instructable a couple years ago that I feel that your source picture was based on. The design has been simplified but the idea is still there. I am still using my table to this date and I am happy to see it has inspired others.

Tanzer266 months ago
I'm a bit worried about people using pressure treated wood. The woodshop co-op I belong to, didn't allow it, due to it's toxicity. I would use cedar posts, a bit more money, but health is important. That aside, I've got a son who'd love this.
double_g Tanzer266 months ago

I'm guessing the author used pressure treated because that's what was available. I don't really see the need for pressure treated or cedar for this table unless you're putting it outside.

pmn93936 months ago

Nice, I'd recommend using a primer first so the wood pattern doesn't come through. I might actually make this myself, been wanting to since the n64 came out.

baneat6 months ago

Awesome!, Could you explain what

- Plane wood from the 5.5 inches down to only 5 inches.

means more clearly? I don't really get what's being done to the posts.

tomatoskins (author)  baneat6 months ago

6x6's are generally 5.5x5.5. The 6x6's that I used were pressure treated, so I wanted to plane them down so it no longer had the ugly marks. That's the only reason that I planed the wood other than to get it flat. In all reality, you can use whatever size of wood you'd like. I wanted to preserve the original ratio of the N64 logo which is why the resulting demotions are what they are. (I added a picture of what preasure treated lumber looks like)

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tomatoskins (author)  tomatoskins6 months ago

Sorry, here is the picture.

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Very cool! This Definetly got my vote. This brings back good memories
rtidwell6 months ago
Very neat idea!! I think I'm going to do this, but probably in a smaller scale..