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Kev Harwick, Nascar racer, credits his race-winning strategy to Instructables Dancando and the summer sewing contest. He said: " He wanted to make something that could give him the edge he needed to win the next cup. Winning the cup has changed my opinion that sewing is a woman's craft."

Sewing is not listed on the top 50 unmanly things to do, in fact the dynamics of racing and sewing are very similar in nature and could never be considered a strictly feminine hobby. Both require knowledge of how things work, oiling parts, replacing belts, fixing broken parts, changing needles, changing light bulbs, screwing a nut, the mechanics of threading, and adjusting the timing.

Let's not forget the use of tools: vacuum cleaner, screw driver, cleaning rags, pliers, and occasional use of a hammer.Operating knowledge of the car or sewing machine is crucial to get the best start such as steering, adjusting the seat, reving the engine, and the precision needed when approaching corners.  So,  guys,  put on your Nascar racing cap, get those sewing machines oiled, adjust the timing and put the pedal to the metal and lets get started making a wrench case!  The possibilities are endless when you can sew custom things that you wished were available.

The inspiration of this ible came from my son-in-law who asked me to make him a wrench case a couple of years ago.  I visted him last month and he commented how much he liked it.  I made him the simple version and am giving him this one as well. 

 This instructable will teach you sewing tips, how to search  videos about threading, oiling, changing bobbin,  and how to sew a basic straight stich and make a pattern for a wrench set/tool case.  I will also mention how to make a simple version.  Sewing is a fun summer craft to do with your children.   Your sons and daughters will love to own a tool case just like Dad and also enjoy learning how a machine works.

Step 1: Sewing Machines

If you are looking for a good sewing machine I suggest buying an older used sewing machine made of metal cases.  They are cheap and are well worth the investment to get them serviced if you need to.  The older machines are much like older cars because they have metal parts that don't need replaced as often.  It cost about 60 dollars to get one serviced if the timing is out or simple oiling and adjusting the tension etc.  I am not sure how much it cost to replace a motor.  To buy a new cheap sewing machine today cost about 100 dollars but they don't last very long before you need them serviced.  Most all of them are made of plastic cases and parts.  Older machines sew better on heavier fabrics, in my opinion.  Remember if sewing heavier fabrics use a heavier needle because if you sew denim or canvas with a small needle it could throw out the timing. 

I have a tanker sewing machine that I love.  It looks like it has gone through a few wars so tanker fits it's discription. It is a Phaff.   I also have a treadle and a Singer feather weight which if you happen to come across one of these they are worth quite a lot,  I have been told. 

Step 2: Sewing Is Not a Difficult Thing to Do

In my opinion if you can drive a car you can sew.  The important things to know is how to operate and care for your sewing machine.  It is kind of like getting accustomed to driving a new car where you have to learn all the buttons and knobs that work for that car.  Practice on a piece of scrap cloth and try different buttons and settings. 

On line videos are available when you google search sewing videos.  How to change needles, change belts, set stitch length, tension, threading a needle, spin a bobbin, and trouble shooting.  I did not know for sure if I could enclude links to videos so I did not enclude them. 

Free on line manuels can  be found on line for many different sewing machines.

When first learning how to sew, stick with simple projects with straight lines like, napkins, block quilts, bags, scarves, curtins, and pillows.  When you are comfrotable with that you can move on to clothing and more difficult projects.

Practice sewing on a scrap piece of cloth until you know the machine.

Cottons are the easiest fabric to sew and is great for beginners. 


Step 3: Trouble Shooting

If your sewing machine runs but the stitches are loose and looped on top or bottom the tension is not set correctly.  Adjust the tension tighter depending on which tension is looping.  When pulling the threads of the top and bobbin at the same time they should be the same tension.  Sometimes the needle is not inserted properly or the needle has a burr.  Improper threading can cause the stitches to skip.  Lint in the feed dog or around the needle can  cause the machine not to sew properly. 

Step 4: SUPPLIES

You will need:

Sewing machine,
Heavy dark fabric such as denim,  canvas, twill, duck  (Yardage depends on how large you want it), I used about 1 and 1/2 yards of fabric and 1 and 1/2 yards interfacing.  I always plan on extra just in case I make a mistake. 
Matching thread,
Heavy iron  in Interfacing (This gives the fabric strength) (Yardage depends on size),
Sissors,
Measuring tape,
Yard stick or straight edge,
Seam ripper,
Iron and Ironing board or a pad for a table top,
1/8 inch piece of hardwood (masonite) for inside tool case to firm sides and bottom. I used a piece of ,hardboard approximately 18X36,
Wrench set and other types of tools to determine what size case and pockets to make.  If making the simple version you won't need this. 
Chalk or marking pen,
Paper for pattern,
Velcro (Simple version only),
Pins,
Heavy duty sewing machine needle (at least 2 or 3 incase you break a needle.)

Materials for handles depending on your preferance.



Step 5: MODIFIED WRENCH CASE SUPPLIES

You will need:

Sewing machine,
Heavy dark fabric such as denim, canvas, twill, duck (Yardage depends on how large you want it),  about 1/2 yards of fabric and 1/2 yard interfacing. I always plan on extra just in case I make a mistake.
Matching thread,
Heavy iron in Interfacing (This gives the fabric strength) (Yardage depends on size),
Sissors,
Measuring tape,
Yard stick or straight edge,
Seam ripper,
Iron and Ironing board or a pad for a table top,

Wrench set,
Chalk or marking pen,
Paper for pattern,
Velcro (Simple version only,)
Pins,
heavy duty sewing machine needle (at least 2 or 3 incase you break a needle.)
Paper for pattern,

Step 6: Read Entire Instructables Before Choosing Fabric and Sewing

Reading the instructions of patterns throughly will save you time, money, and reduce mistakes.  It also helps you understand how something is going together and reduce confusion of a particular step. 


For all seams make them 1/4 inch through out this instructables except for the top hem which could be 1/2 inch turn down for the hem. 

Step 7: Designing Pattern

Designing a pattern requires a little  imagination.  Decide what size you need by choosing what  you will want in your case.  This instructable will be making a case designed to carry wrenches and tools.  The longest tool will be an average sized hammer.  The wrenches will be placed in the side of the bag and the hammer and other tools will be inside the case and in the outside pocket.. 
A simple version of the wrench case with out the tool pouch can be made instead if you want an easier pattern to make.

Lay out your tools you want your case to hold.  Here is the wrench pocket pattern.  I cut it on an angle so it is easy to grab a wrench.  I used paper towels to mark pattern.  

I designed this pattern to be lined to add strength and durability.  We will be making 2 separate cases.  One for the outside of the case  and the other for inside the case for lining. 

I will give instructions for  the modified version toward the end of this instructable. 


 

Step 8: Pre-wash/dry New Fabric

Washing new fabric is important because most fabrics shrink and fade when washed.  This is the best way to make sure your sewing project turns out nice even after it is washed.  You can read washing instructions on the end of the fabric bolt before you buy it.  Before choosing fabric for sewing keep in mind the use of the project and choose one that will work for it's purpose. A tool case needs to be heavy and strong because it will be outdoors in the weather, it will be used a lot, and it will get dirty.   

Step 9: CUTTING ALL PATTERN PIECES

Cut all fabric on straight edge

WRENCH CASE:
Cut 2 black sides 16 X 10 1/4,
Cut 2 ends 10 1/2 X 6 1/2,
Cut 1 bottom piece 16 X 6 1/2,

LINING:
Cut 2 black sides 16 X 10 1/4,
Cut 2 ends 10 1/2 X 6 1/2,
Cut 1 bottom 16 X 6 1/2,

INTERFACING FOR CASE BAG:

Cut 2 sides 16 X 6 1/2,
Cut 2 ends 10 1/2 X  6 1/2,
Cut 1 bottom 16 X 6 1/2,

CUT (PRINT) OUTSIDE POCKET PIECE:

Cut  2:  15 1/2 X 7 1/2,

CUT INTERFACING FOR POCKET PIECE:

Cut one interfacing 15 1/2 X 7 1/2,

CUT WRENCH POCKET PIECE:

Cut 2 from print on an angle as shown in picture,

Using the pocket piece's  as a pattern cut one from interfacing. 




Step 10: IRON ALL INTERFACINGS TO CASE PIECES

Iron all the interfacing pieces to the wrong side of the wrench case/pouch pieces, the sides, ends, bottom, and both pockets.  The lining fabric does not need interfacing.

Step 11: SEW WRENCH POCKET TO LINING PIECE

Sew your wrench pocket to the lining piece at the angle of the fabric,  back stitching at the beginning and end of the seams.  Press seams open Fold on the angle with wrong sides together and press. 

Step 12: SEW WRENCH POCKET TO WRENCH CASE

Place the wrench side piece on the table right side up.  Place the pocket over the top of it lining it up on the bottom edge and pin into place.  Sew the pocket to the case back stitching at the beginning and ends to secure thread.  Mark seams for the wrench pockets and sew one at a time making sure each wrench fits properly into the pocket before sewing the next wrench size. Make several passes  over each stitch to double enforse it.  You do not need to back stitch because you are not cutting the strings after each pass.  You will pivot at the ends, turning it around and sew over your stitch you just made.  I sewed this case with white thread so you can see the sewing better.  Set aside.

Step 13: SEW SIDE TOOL POCKET TO SIDE TOOL POCKET LINING.

With wrong sides together sew side tool pocket piece to side tool pocket lining at top, back stitching at the beginning and ends of the seam.    Press seam open then fold over like you did on the wrench pocket and press.  You should have a finished top and 3 unfinished edges.  One on the bottom or long end and 2 on the ends. 

Place your tool case side piece right side up and then place your pocket (printed fabric ) over the top linning it up with the bottom edge.  Sew sides back stitching at the beginning and ends of the seams. 

Step 14: SEW SIDE POCKET FOR TOOLS ON FRONT OF CASE.

Place your case piece with the tool pocket right side up on the table.  Next place right side of your end piece (with interfacing ironed on it)  over the top of your case piece and sew the short edge together.  When you open it the side has just gotten longer.  Now sew the other end just like it.  Next press the seam open. 

Step 15: SEW ENDS TO BACK TOOL PIECE.

Sew The wrench pocket piece to the tool pocket piece at the sides so in the end they will form a rectangle. 

Step 16: SEW BOTTOM TO SIDES.

With right sie together sew the bottom to the bottom side of the case.  Make sure if you are using a one way pocket design to sew the bottom to the correct end, oterwise you case will look like it is up side down.   Sew both long edges of the bottom to the bottom piece back stitching at the beginning and end of each seam.  Next sew the ends to the bottom piece back stitching at both ends.  This part is kind of tricky because you need to flatten the ends to sew it nicely.  Turn right side out.  Now you have a bag.  Next we will sew the lining.

Step 17: SEW THE LINING

Follow the entire sewing instructions for the lining omit the interfacing part, pockets, wrench pocket etc.  You just want to make a plain bag to insert into the tool and wrench bag.    Sew the triangle piece together and fold over and iron, Place over the side edge of the case and sew the ends.  Sew the tool pocket at the top and fold over and press.  Sew the tool pocket to the case at the ends.  Sew the ends to the tool pocket piece and sew the wrench pocket piece to the tool pocket piece forming a rectangle.  Sew the bottom lining to the long edge of the tool pocket piece bottom.  Sew the other side of the linning bottom to the remaining tool pocket bottom.  Sew the bottom ends to the bottom of the case. 

Step 18: PLACE LINING INSIDE WRENCH CASE

Set lining inside of wrench case and make sure it fits snuggly.  If it does not fit, adjust by sewing in the sides a little more or less depending on the fit.  When it fits right measure the openings from the  side, ends,  and bottom.  You want to cut 4 pieces of hard board to fit the ends snuggly but not too tight or too loose.  You need to cut 2 end pieces, 2 side pieces and one bottom piece to fit in- between the linning and the wrench case.    Better to cut too large than too small, you can always trim it slightly if needed.  You need to cut the height 1 inch shorter because we will be taking the entire case with the boards in it to the sewing machine and sew the top lining to the fabric so we don't want to break a needle trying to sew through the board.  Remove the lining and cut your boards.

Step 19: PLACE BOARDS IN THE SIDES OF THE CASE

Place all 5 boards in the sides and bottom of the case.  Next place the lining back into the bag.  Turn down 1/4 to 1/2 inch on both of the lining and the case to have a finished edge.  Turn the edges toward the wrong side of the fabric to have a nice edge and pin into place.  Next we will make the handles. 

 

Step 20: HANDLES

Cut 2 black fabric 6 1/2 X 22.
Fold several times ending with a nice edge the width you want.
Sew seam.  Place handle inside the case and the lining and pin and sew all the way around the top of the case.

Step 21: SEW THE TOP EDGE TO FINISH THE CASE

Step 22: PLACE ALL YOUR WRENCHES AND TOOLS INTO THE BAG

Step 23: CUT AND SEW MODIFIED VERSION

Cut all fabric on straight edge

WRENCH CASE:
Cut 2 black sides 16 X 10 1/4,
Cut 2 ends 10 1/2 X 6 1/2,
Cut 1 bottom piece 16 X 6 1/2,

LINING:
Cut 2 black sides 16 X 10 1/4,
Cut 2 ends 10 1/2 X 6 1/2,
Cut 1 bottom 16 X 6 1/2,

INTERFACING FOR CASE BAG:

Cut 2 sides 16 X 6 1/2,
Cut 2 ends 10 1/2 X 6 1/2,
Cut 1 bottom 16 X 6 1/2,

CUT (PRINT) OUTSIDE POCKET PIECE:

Cut 2 FROM BLACK FABRIC 16 x 10 1/4,

CUT INTERFACING FOR POCKET PIECE:

Cut 2 interfacing 16 x 10 1/4

CUT WRENCH POCKET PIECE:

Cut 2 from print on an angle as shown in picture,

Using the pocket piece as a pattern cut 2 from interfacing.

Go back and read the instructions for the wrench pocket.  The only differance is you are going to cut one extra side piece 16 X 10 1/4 and interfacing for it . You are going to iron the interfacing to this piece and then lay it on the table with both right sides together. 

PLEASE NOTE: you will also be adding velcrow to secure your case.

Then sew all the way around it leaving the top edge open.  Turn the side piece right side out and press.  Iron interfacing to wrong side of pocket pieces and put right sides together and sew the angled piece of pocket together.  Fold it in half and press. 

Then place the pocket over the side and sew it to the side.  Next you place your tools over the pocket piece.   Mark your pocket lines.  Sew the pocket lines one at a time making sure the wrench fits properly.  Continue with the marking and sewing until all wrench pockets are sewn. 

Fold the case several times to decide where you want to place the velcrow and hand sew it to the case.  Place tools in case and fold it in a roll and secure it with the velcrow. 


Step 24: NASCAR YOUR WAY TO THE CUP

You are set to go to win the next cup.  Enjoy your victory!
<p>This is a great tutorial. I need a bag for transporting my sewing machine to and from my classroom; and I think this is just what I need. It's very sturdy. I'm printing this tutorial and gathering the materials I'll need. No wrenches, just sewing accessories. I'll tweak it to suite my needs and will have just what my machines and I need. Thanks for the easy to understand and follow tutorial.</p>
Hey Sunshiine! I was just looking at this and all of the other Nascar ibles on the site again, and I believe the racer's name is Kevin Harvick. Once again let me add that this is pretty cool! :)<br><br>Cheers!<br>-NK
<p>Thanks for stopping by and commenting. It was a pun actually. I was trying to be funny. Glad you liked the ible though. Have a great day!</p><p>sunshiine</p>
<p>Oh, I see, sorry. Haha, but I can actually imagine him saying that now. XD </p>
<p>Now that makes me feel good knowing he might have really said that!. I enjoyed making this project for my son-in-law; who still uses this bag. Thanks again!</p><p>sunshiine</p>
JEFF GORDON RULES!!!
I am not a NASCAR fan so I will take your word for it! I hope your hero wins again and do have a splendorous weekend! <br>sunshiine
Thanks and you too!
Thank you for this idea. Now I have something I can make for my young adult son, who is no longer interested in the &quot;usual&quot; things mothers sew for them during their growing years!
I love this bag, especially the pouches for the wrenches. Anyone would be proud to make and own one of these babies!
Thanks! Hopefully my son- in -law will like it too!
Very nicely done.<br />One day I dream of owning a Pfaff. They are magnificent beasts!
Thanks! This one took a long time because my session would run out loosing all my work. Very frustrating but I finally got it there. Yes, Phaff is a super machine. Hope you get yours!

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