Introduction: NJAK - NOT Just Another Kickstand

I have never liked the standard kick stands that are found on most bikes. They just aren't dependable support except on dry, flat, hard surfaces. Standard kick stands are especially unreliable on a long bike like the Xtends Cargo Bike (https://www.instructables.com/id/Xtends-Convert-Your-Bike-Into-A-Long-Cargo-Bike/). So here is a shot at designing something at least a little bit better.

This kickstand is pretty ugly so it may be more suited for cargo bikes. I would hesitate to do this on a good bike if the kickstand wasn't one you could remove and replace. If your kickstand is welded on and this design doesn't work out, you are stuck.

The kickstand needs to be a steel one. Some are aluminum and can't be easily joined to EMT.

All of the dimensions may be slightly different on your bike. Be prepared to do some trial and error fitting to make it work for you.

You will be welding EMT (Electrical Metallic Tubing) conduit so please check out the safety tips in this Instructable (https://www.instructables.com/id/Welding-EMT-Conduit/).

Step 1: Cut Off the Curved Tip of the Kickstand

You may or may not need to cut off the tip of your kickstand. I did to make it easier to weld on the tubing. In my case, with 26" wheels, the kickstand rod ended up being 10" long.

Step 2: Add Cross Tube


Start with a piece of scrap 1/2" EMT about a foot long and position it under the cut end of the kickstand. Position it so the kickstand sits on top of the tubing about 3" in from the end as shown in this photo.

Tack weld the tube to the kickstand. Fold up the kickstand and make sure it clears everything. Then lower the kickstand and weld the tubing in place securely.

Step 3: Cut Off the Excess Tubing

Fold up the kickstand with the tubing attached. Mark the tubing about 1/2" out from where the tubing passes under the chain. This dimension is fairly critical as you need to clear the chain but be inside where your foot on the pedal will clear the kickstand when it is up.

Use a tubing cutter or hacksaw to cut the excess tubing off. In my case the cross tube ended up being about 7.5" long (4.5" from the weld).

Step 4: Add the Right Angle Tubes


Lower the kickstand and position a short piece (about 4" long) of 1/2" EMT at right angles to the cross tube as shown in Photo #1. Tack the right angle tube in place. Check the position and then weld it solidly. Photo #2 shows the kickstand in the up position.

Add second right angle tube on the left end of the cross tube. This piece can be about 6" long. See Photo #3.

Photo #4 shows both right angle tubes on the cross tube with the kickstand in the up position.

Step 5: Cut the Right Angle Tube Where It Passes Under the Chain

Mark the short right angle tube as you rotate the kickstand up and down. Mark it just below where it clears the chain on the way up. Then use the tubing cutter to cut away the excess. In my case the right angle tube ended up being 3" long.

Check all the clearances. See Photo #2.

The new kickstand also acts as a chain support in the up position. This is handy with the long chain run on the Xtends Cargo Bike.

Note: There are close to 100 hits if you search the Instructables Web site for "kickstand". So maybe this IS just another kickstand. (:

Comments

author
steam_cannon (author)2010-10-13

Great idea! Regarding the welding, I think this would be a better project if you used an aluminum kick stand and aluminum rods. A lot of kick stands are aluminum and you can braze aluminum very easily with a cheap hand torch and an hts-735 no-flux brazing stick. No welding skills required. I haven't posted an instructable on that yet, but they work great! Those welding sticks are a little pricey, but much cheaper and easier then a stick welder. Plus they work for any other non-ferrous metals like magnesium. Anyway, I think that would make this project much much easier.

author
bikeframe (author)steam_cannon2010-10-13

I didn't know about the brazing sticks. I will check them out and look forward to your Instructable on their use. Thanks for your comments.

author
jdege (author)2010-10-13

I found that if I simply removed the kickstand, I never had a problem with the bike falling over.

author
bikeframe (author)jdege2010-10-13

Don't you get tired standing there all night holding your bike up? (smile)

author
steam_cannon (author)bikeframe2010-10-13

LOL

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