Introduction: Name Plate Using LED's

Hi friend's,here I'm going to tell you how to create a simple nameplate using LED's.LED's are supercool,recently I got attracted towards LED,Therefore I wanted to do something like LEDCUBE,but that needs Microcontroller,Inorder to do something simple ,I came up with this Idea of making a nameplate using LED's.Let's start..

Step 1: Requirements

You will need only these things to do this simply awesome nameplate:
1.PCB board
2.LED's(I have used RED color LED)
3.Paper,sketch and scissor
4.Soldering Iron
5.Lead
6.9v battery and connector
7.Resistor (680 ohms)
The reason for using 680 ohms:
To find resistance,[R= (Vs-Vf)/If]

Vs-Supply voltage(9 volts),

Vf-Forward voltage of Red LED(2.2 volts),

If-Forward current of RED LED(10mA).
On substituting the values,We will get Resistance of 680 ohms.

Step 2: Basement

Write your name in a paper which is exactly on the size of the PCB board you are going to use.
♡♡**If you wanna gift it to someone special,Write your name along with their name,This could be the best memorable gift,because,even after the lifetime of the LED , the setup will look good,therfore that special person won't forget you**♡♡

Step 3: Setting It Up

Place your LED's ,over your name,If it seems tough to plot your LED,keep a flashlight under the board,theefore the holes will be visible over the paper too.
&*IMPORTANT NOTE:
1.Place your leds in parellel(Positive to Positive & Negative to Negative of one LED to the next one).
The reason that why we are using this PARELLEL CONNECTION is,The VOLTAGE will be same in PARELLEL.
Therefore we can use small voltages like(3v,6v,9v,12v) for this whole setup.After placing all the LED's cut down the paper.
EDIT:[ We are going to connect all LED's in parellel(means all positives are connected together and all negatives together),Then connect the positive terminal of the battery to the any positive of the LED(remember all LED positives are connected together).similiarly connect the positive terminal of the resistor to any negative of the LED,then connect both the negatives of the battery and resistor].

Step 4: Soldering

Hmm!!I still need to develop my soldering skills!Since this is my second instructable which is done using soldering,This soldering is better than my first soldering project PCB bus(Please don't see that).
Coming back to our project,Solder the LED's on the PCB board.Connect the Resistor at the negative terminal of the LED's.After connecting positive terminal of the battery to the positive terminal ot the positive of Positive LED,Connect negative of the battery to the negative of the resistor.

Step 5: Tada!!

Now,your LED nameplate is done!!...
Thanks for reading my instructable..
I would be happy to see your nameplates on my comments..?..
For any doubts and suggestions,please comment.(also for grammar mistakes).

Comments

author
manikantachunduru made it!(author)2017-03-03

hii khadu77

I would like to present a gift of LED name plate to my lover on her birth day. please help me in making the led board ready.

so please help in

author
Lavoz24 made it!(author)2016-04-02

nice, thanks for sharing. Advice: so that in the future your solder jobs come out neater you should solder on to the side with the exposed metal. You put the led's on the wrong side of pcb and this is why solder job looks like this. All in all I really liked this instructable.

author
achheda1 made it!(author)2016-01-07

I made it using 85 blue led's and input voltage is 9v and max led current is 20 mA so the quater watt resistor of 300 ohms is getting hit so should i increase the value of resistor or the wattage?

temp_-2061542246.jpg
author
khadu77 made it!(author)2016-01-07

what do you mean by getting hit bro?

author
Kyansanphone made it!(author)2015-12-21

How about the connection of LEDs, resistors, and the supplies?

author
khadu77 made it!(author)2015-12-21

Hope this helps .I have connected all LED's in parellel(means all positives are connected together and all negatives together),Then connect the positive terminal of the battety to the any positive of the LED(remember all LED positives are connected together).similiarly connect the positive terminal of the resistor to any negative of the LED,then connect both the negatives of the battery and resistor.

temp_-1214555809.jpg
author
mikenaly made it!(author)2015-12-16

I'm a little lost on your math for the resistor. Correct me if I'm wrong, but if I counted right you're using 47 leds? If you're running them all in parallel with a 680 ohm resistor then you're only getting about 6.7 mA for the entire display. That gives you less than .15 mA per led. I'm not sure that's enough to light them. To get 10 mA through each led you would need a resistor of about 14.5 Ohms and it would have to be physically big enough to dissipate a little over 3 Watts. (closest would probably be 5W). Could you verify your components for me? I would hate to see you have an under rated resistor and create a potential fire hazard.

author
khadu77 made it!(author)2015-12-16

You can always give an LED less current. Running an LED near its rated maximum current gives you maximum brightness, at the cost of power dissipation (heat) and battery life (if you’re running off of batteries, of course.) If you want your batteries to last ten times longer, you can usually just pick a current that is only one tenth of the rated maximum current.

author
mikenaly made it!(author)2015-12-17

Yes, I am aware of all that. My point was in the fact that given the number of leds you are using and the values you have selected each led is receiving only about 1/100th of its maximum value not 1/10th. Thats why i asked you to verify your values for me. If you have found leds that work reliably on such a low current then kudos to you. I personally have never had leds illuminate at such a low level.

author
khadu77 made it!(author)2015-12-17

Okay,On using a 680 ohm resistor ,a single will LED get 10mA,Now that 10mA is divided with 47 LED's,
Therefore 10/47=0.2,Which means each LED's will get 1/5th of their rated current value..I hope this solves the problem..

author
mikenaly made it!(author)2015-12-17

Actually 2 mA would be 1/5 of 10. Therefore if you're getting .2 mA then that would be 1/50, wouldn't it?

author
khadu77 made it!(author)2015-12-17

Uff,sorry for that..But that can light my LED's very well,Anyway thank you so much ,this little convo gave some bonus knowledge about LED's..

author
mikenaly made it!(author)2015-12-17

No problem.

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