Instructables

Natural Dye From Pokeweed

FeaturedContest Winner
Picture of Natural Dye From Pokeweed
2 Pokeweed.JPG

This last year, I nurtured a pretty little weed in my backyard.  It grew and thrived and grew and grew until it pretty much blocked the door to the backyard.  I protected it from all attempts to cut it down because it was a pokeweed.  A huge, 5 foot tall majestic pokeweed.  And pokeweed produces pokeweed berries, which are big, beautiful purple berries that dye the skin bright fuchsia.  I was going to gather these and try my hand at dyeing yarn.

In the great big universal intellect called the internet, I could find nothing on how to prepare them, so I began a trek to experiment and find the perfect recipe.

A friend raises alpaca and I bought several skeins of her lightest wool, (from Amelia who is the cuddliest alpaca you will ever meet).  The yarn was an off-white.  I was going to see if I could change that.

Let’s talk mordants.  Most fabric and yarn do not readily take a dye.  They must be treated first with something that will bind the dye to the material.  That binding agent is called a mordant.  The most common ones are salt, vinegar, alum, and iron. 

The closest recipe I could find was one using blackberries.  For that, they used a salt mordant, so there I began.

 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up
wait... that's alpaca?


Protein based fibers are easy to dye when you use acid. The dye will permanently bond to the protein if you do it right.

Try citric acid if the vinegar isn't enough to bind the dye to the fiber.

Add the acid TO the dye. Simmer it all with the fiber, either wool (alpaca included) or silk. Rinse in cool water and it should work well.



Protein fibers can also be dyed with kool-aid in the microwave, thanks to the citric acid in it. What's amazing about dyeing wool and other protein fibers is that you'll be able to see the water in the dye pot turn clear once the fiber has absorbed it all.
Uncle Kudzu6 months ago
And the young leaves in the Spring are tasty when cooked down like spinach with eggs!
Welsh Dragonfly (author)  Uncle Kudzu6 months ago
As I mentioned above, the pokeweed plant needs to be cooked in specific ways to break down the poisons. If it is incorrectly prepared, it is still poisonous. I caution my reader to be SURE they are preparing it correctly before eating it.
Well, I did some research and it seems that you are correct to generally consider the plant poison.

I do recall that the person who prepared it for me cooked the egg and poke salad dish  by boiling the poke salad twice in a fresh change of water and then cooked it again in a cast iron skillet with the eggs, and used only young leaves from a young plant, but I thought all the cooking and stress on young leaves was about removing any bitterness. But you are apparently right to address the potential of poisoning.

Anyway, this is a very well done instructable that I'm passing on to the GF, who is the handler of yarns in our household. Thanks for sharing this use of a very common (to my area) plant. I apologize for hijacking the discussion toward the food use of it.
neo716656 months ago
Keep it out of the reach of kids. Poke salad is poisonous. When you eat it there is a required method to remove the toxins. By boiling it down for the color I would think you only made the poison mix stronger.
Welsh Dragonfly (author)  neo716656 months ago
I agree. I have heard that various parts of the plant are edible IF they are prepared in correctly. My inclination is to consider the entire plant poisonous and treat it as such.
The leaves and stalks are edible if prepared correctly. Young leaves are much like greens. The stalks are fried like okra. The berries and roots are highly toxic. I was taught to wash my hands after just picking it because it can poison you just through the skin.
The leaves and stalks are edible if prepared correctly. Young leaves are much like greens. The stalks are fried like okra. The berries and roots are highly toxic. I was taught to wash my hands after just picking it because it can poison you just through the skin.
r_harris26 months ago
a good instructible and a graphic demonstration of the fact that end colors are often different than the original source material !
ChrysN6 months ago
Nice, it is interesting to see the difference between using salt and vinegar mordants, I'd love to see the effects of the other mordants.
Pro

Get More Out of Instructables

Already have an Account?

close

PDF Downloads
As a Pro member, you will gain access to download any Instructable in the PDF format. You also have the ability to customize your PDF download.

Upgrade to Pro today!