Step 3: Sharpening Process

I like to shop at thrift stores and go to swap meets / flea markets. It's always fun to see what treasures you'll find. I found this case xx knife, which has a sturdy blade of surgical stainless steel. To sharpen it, here is what I did.
  1. The sharpening stone was obtained at a local Harbor Freight store about $10 and is triple sided. Gray is coarse, green is medium, white is fine.
  2. I'm not sure whether the stone is oil/water. To make life simple, I used a squeeze bottle to apply water. The water went right through the stone, unlike my previous silicon carbide stone so I had to water it with every swipe of the blade.
  3. As with any polishing task, I started with the most coarse stone and a 7 degree angle between the stone and blade. I worked my way down to the toothpaste strop. With each change, I wiped the blade to prevent cross contamination. and increased the blade angle slightly. I think this method produces a sharp blade that is tough to dull, but does not slice through things as well as a blade made by keeping the angle constant. More comments are welcome as to proper technique since this is my first attempt at "proper" knife sharpening.
Honestly, the car buffing compound strop was too thick. Pieces kept coming off and the motion was not very smooth. I hope this goes away with more use, but I think just using the toothpaste strop ought to be good enough.
I was told years ago that the used girth of a horse saddle made the best strop.
One of those "why didn't I think of that" ideas, Thanks !!
A wet/oil stone and a honing steel serve two different purpouses. Stropping is needed to break the microscopic "saw tooths" that the grain of the stone leave on the edge and a excess steel that did not come off during the stone sharpening
great tutorial! try to use carborundum powder instead of the toothpaste. well done

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Bio: I'm an Engineer. I like hiking, flea markets, and electronics.
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