Instructables

Organic Vegan Twinkie Recipe

Featured
Picture of Organic Vegan Twinkie Recipe
The best of all the homemade Twinkie recipes we tried, these organic vegan twinkie cakes will knock even the most conventional meat-eater's socks off.

As you might remember from our Great Twinkie Taste Off, the following recipe comes from this review which was too provocative to ignore.  As the winner of the challenge, these Twinkie cakes have earned their own complete Instructable.

It's no small undertaking, but the resulting cakes are so delightful, you won't begrudge a moment of effort, and your friends will be begging you for more.


 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up

Step 1: Necessities

Picture of Necessities
fillingingredients.jpg
This is no small list of ingredients.  I, for one, had never used arrowroot before, and had to search three different stores for it before I realized I was searching in the entirely wrong section all along.  (check in spices)


Cake:

* 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
* 1 cup unbleached white flour
* 6 tablespoons light organic cane sugar
* 1 teaspoon aluminum-free baking powder
* 1 teaspoon baking soda
* ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
* 1/3 cup expeller pressed canola oil
* ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons maple syrup, Grade A, dark amber
* ¾ cup vanilla soymilk or rice milk
* 2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract
* 2 1/2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar


Filling:

* 7 ounces firm tofu, drained (simmer in water for 5 minutes)
* 4 teaspoons expeller pressed canola oil
* 2 tablespoons maple syrup, Grade A amber
* 3 tablespoons raw light agave syrup
* 6 tablespoons light organic cane sugar
* 3/4 teaspoon very finely grated lemon zest
* 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
* 4 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
* ½ teaspoon pure coconut extract
* 1/4 teaspoon pure almond extract
* 1 1/2 ounces of vegan white chocolate melted
* 2 tablespoons arrowroot dissolved in 6 tablespoons soy creamer


You will need a food processor.

Step 2: Make tiny Twinkie-shaped molds

Picture of Make tiny Twinkie-shaped molds
fold2.jpg
fold3.jpg
formed.jpg
forms.jpg

The trick for making a Twinkie mold is quite simple, and easy to get the hang of. Don't waste your money on fancy Twinkie making kits (which I understand do exist). And if you're making Twinkies for the legions, I recommend making the half-sized molds that I used. In fact, just do it that way. You don't need to be eating that much Twinkie! Then you can have two.

Cut a bunch of 9" sheets of aluminum foil (enough to suit the recipe you're using).
Fold each piece of aluminum foil in half twice.
Wrap the folded foil around a small spice bottle to create a mold.
Leave the top of the mold open for pouring in the batter.

Repeat.

Preheat the oven to 325oF (160oC)

Spray the molds with non-stick cook spray.

Arrange on a cookie sheet or in a shallow pan.

Step 4: Bake those cakes

Preheat the oven to 325oF (160C)

Spray the molds with non-stick cook spray.

Divide batter evenly among the molds, and bake until cakes spring back when touched, a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, and cakes are golden brown, about 20 to 22 minutes.

Remove from the oven and let cool for 5 minutes; then remove from the forms by peeling away the foil.  Cool completely on racks.

Once cakes are cool, flip each over, and with a straw or a skewer make two holes on the bottom of the cake (three for full sized Twinkies).   The point of this is to dig out some space for the filling to be injected later.

Step 5: Make the filling

While the cakes are baking, make the filling.

Tofu based creams must be pureed until absolutely smooth and creamy. If properly made, there will be absolutely no taste of tofu.

Make sure you've prepped the ingredients as stated in the list:

Simmer the tofu in a pot of water for 5 minutes.

Dissolve the arrowroot in the soy creamer.


Crumble the tofu into a food processor and process for 1 minute.

Add the oil and process 1 minute.

Add the rest of the ingredients except the arrowroot (which is now mixed with the soy creamer), and process 3 to 4 minutes, until the mixture is very smooth and creamy.

Stop the processor a few times and clean the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula.

Stir the dissolved arrowroot to release any starch that has settled to the bottom.

Pour the arrowroot mixture into a small saucepan and cook, whisking frequently over medium heat until the mixture reaches a full boil.  It will be very thick and gummy. Immediately remove the saucepan from the stove.

Add the thickened arrowroot to the rest of the filling ingredients and pulse to incorporate.

Process until the filling is smooth.

Spoon the filling into a container.

Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours or longer to allow the flavors to blend.

Step 6: Pipe in the Filling

Picture of Pipe in the Filling
small.jpg
Scoop filling into a pastry bag fitted with a medium-size plain tip (or snip the corner off of a small plastic bag).

Place the tip into one of the holes you made on the bottom of the twinkie, and squeeze some filling into into until full. Like super full.  Fuller than you think they should be - these cakes can hold a surprising amount of filling!  Repeat with remaining holes.

Now they're ready to serve.   Enjoy your organic vegan treats and be sure to share the love.


Leftovers can be stored and chilled in an airtight container.
1-40 of 73Next »
WOAH I am Vegetarian and I can NEVER even try to eat Twinkies. Nope to much gross stuff like Milk and nasty stuff like that. But YOU made the. Best. Idea. Ever. THANK YOU MAAM. Simply Genius!
izzyinsf4 years ago
If vegan wasn't a priority, was there another choice of filling from one of the other recipes that you'd recommend? Not that there's anything wrong with the vegan lifestyle choice, but I can't in good conscience use tofu in a twinkie.
Actually, Tofu being just a Protein Base product has very little of it's own taste, so it would take on whatever flavors are combined with it. Seeing the amount of extras that are listed with that cream base. Besides, what do you think they put in the real twinkies?
Tofu always gets a bad rap. It is a fantastic source of protein, and it does take on whatever flavor you give it. If you had one of these vegan Twinkies made with tofu and nobody told you beforehand that it had tofu in it, you would never know.

Just make sure that when you do use it, to use the non-GMO tofu - Soybeans are a top crop (along with wheat and corn) to be genetically altered to keep the megalocorporations rich. They don't care about people, the animals, or the planet-all they care about is profit.
I'm with you. I try to avoid soy, as it can act like estrogen in the system. I like being a man. Besides, I cannot in good conscience give up my raw milk. Too many nutrients.
The phytoestrogens in soy are different than mammalian estrogen... they don't react the same way in a plant system as they would when consumed by humans and will not have an impact on your manhood, despite what you might read ...

I do also have to add that in good conscience I could not use milk from any animal species - the way that animals are treated on factory farms is inexcusable. Dairy is a by-product of the veal industry, and I cannot support such a cruel and inhumane practice. Even if the raw milk you are consuming is from a small family farm where animals may be treated humanely, the point is, that cow's milk is designed and intended for baby cows (goat's milk for baby goats, sheep's milk for baby sheep, etc), not humans... Despite all the available nutrients available in raw milk, the human digestive system can't process dairy effectively enough to reap the benefits of these nutrients that are designed perfectly for whatever species they originated from.
nevermind, i answered my own question in the other instructable. p.s. mmmmmmmmmm
scoochmaroo (author)  izzyinsf4 years ago
Yeah, if you go with that combo, you will not be disappointed!
For those avoiding soy, you can make the cream filling with coconut milk (the kind in a can), vanilla extract, and agave nectar - Refrigerate a can of full-fat coconut milk overnight in the back of your fridge - open it from the bottom with a triangular hand can opener ("Church key") and drain off coconut water; (discard or use for something else) Open it from the top and scoop out the resulting coconut cream and place into a bowl. The amount will vary, but you can usually get anywhere from 1/4 c to 1 c, depending on various unknown factors. Whip in vanilla (~1 tsp) and agave (to taste; may use other sweeteners if desired) . Only mix for a minute or so-just long enough to incorporate the ingredients and to make it fluffy. Transfer to a piping bag or icing injector to get the cream inside the cakes. (something like this http://www.ebay.com/itm/CUPCAKE-FILLING-INJECTOR-CAKE-PASTRY-ICING-DECORATING-/350451870677 )
I totally missed out on that competition :( I make my own version of vegan Twinkies (aka Vinkies, as my sister calls them). I make my crerne filling from coconut milk (full fat), agave nectar, and pure vanilla extract (all organic). The recipe can be found in my book, Recipes From The Kitchen Of A Self -Proclaimed Veganista ( but I'll post it here too at some point)
susanrm3 years ago
I just saw this. It looks amazing! I haven't read through all the comments, because there are so many, but in case this was missed - SILK hasn't been organic in a couple of years. It was bought by Dean Foods, which promptly moved to Chinese non-organic soybeans (yikes), and they relabeled it "natural" instead of "organic." People who were used to the product didn't necessarily notice the new labeling. I informed my co-op, which now carries So Delicious creamers made from coconut instead. They are tasty AND organic.

Love the recipe, will try it when sweets are permissible again! I would love to know if someone has successfully adapted it to work with powdered stevia.
nikkab0o3 years ago
my grandfather is diabetic and i planned on making these for him. i'm already subbing the sugar for splenda, is there anything i can sub the maple syrup for?
and if anyone could tell me where to find vegan whit choc. i've checked like three stores already!
also at the end it says, leftovers can be stored and chilled. does that mean it HAS to be refrigerated?
beowulf_4 years ago
Oh I see. In a previous section, where you said to "make an incision," I thought that meant a cut down the length of the cake. But from this picture it looks like you actually meant, "make two holes on the bottom of each cake (one hole at each end)." I'm assuming the holes should be no deeper than halfway through the cake?
scoochmaroo (author)  beowulf_4 years ago
I've updated the instructions to try and be more clear. Thanks for the input!
How do you fill the cakes the way Twinkies are filled with just the 2 holes?
Doesn't the "dug out" part have to connect the two holes so that you have a tube of filling in the middle rather than filling in 2 spots?
TheChemiker4 years ago
Why organic? Organic is just an overhyped type of food and farming that has no benifits at all. It is no better than conventional farming, in fact, It is actually worse.
Ah, the Internet, where Monsanto shills can roam at will, making statements with no foundation at all.. Gotta love it.
No, I know my stuff. Organic can carry diseases, while conventional cannot. Organic uses more farmland for the same amount of food, making it much less land effeciant. Conventional farming uses fertilizer that is engineered not to harm humans and make the plant grow larger, faster, and produce more food. And ad extra nutrients. I knew someone would say something like that, but where are your foundations? Tell me why organic is better. Who says you know your stuff?
We were growing organic food from the origins of human agricultural practice until extremely recently - up to about the end of the second world war. Organic vegetables and other foods only carry disease when they become infected by contact with animal waste or spoiled meat in the handling process. Farmers who use traditional practices, like using manure for fertilizer, must know how to properly compost the fertilizer, otherwise it can transmit pathogens. Organic farming can actually grow much more food per acre, especially when using biointensive methods. Crop loss from insects has remained about the same, the only difference is massive profits to agricultural input makers and huge expense for farmers. The chemicals used as pesticides and herbicides are deathly for the people who eat them, and for the environment they are used in.
We were going to the bathroom in bushes until recently, we were walking barefoot to locations until recently, but do we still do that now? No, we have invented better ways of doing things like that, including farming. And there have been death cases from organic food due to the farmer not knowing what he was doing and transmitting disease, but none with conventional farming. And no, the pesticides and herbicides are not deadly for the people who eat them, because we get it in such a mircosopic dose that it does not harm us. We have uranium natually in our bodies, but it is not toxic to us because the amount is so small. They also don't affect the enviroment. And the fact that organic farming can transmit disease is bad, because not every farmer can make the food safe. And conventional does grow more land per square acre, organic will always be less efficiant, because the manure does not have all of the nutrients that fertilizer does. Why do we have to use the same method our ancestors used, if we have designed a better way?
can't leave bettbee hanging out there. bettbee is just plain right. that is simple. If Monsanto or Dow is paying a troll to hang out and misinform the boards, they should be outed for speaking that trash. Clearly what TheChemiker calls "conventional" farming is an euphemism for destructive practices that endanger all our lives.
bettbee is just plain wrong. Conventional farming is not at all a destructive practice, and it does not endanger anybody's life. And even if all of my arguments were irrelevent, there is one that shows that organic is worthless: cost. If all farming were organic, the world would not be able to buy any food. People would starve becaue organic is so much more inefficiant and expensive. We would have a shortage of food, and the food that is produced would be too expensive to buy for a huge amount of people. This is not a thing I made up, this is fact. So unless you want food to become incredibly expensive and not have as much food as before, you should realize that conventional farming with fertilizer is the safer and better way.
Seriously, TheChemiker "oh, no...we're all going to die of food shortage". Nice try. You are not communicating with an uninformed person, it is not even barely possible that a person educated to these issues could hold your professed opinion. Simply wrong. I was not wanting to argue with TheChemisitute, I am agreeing with bettbee. But while I have your attention: Address the real issue, which is... "How much does TheChemiker get paid?". There is a very small group of people who actually benefit from telling vicious lies like this to the rest of us. Are you, Chemi, one of those? Do you derive your income, pay your rent, buy your own pesticide-laden food with money earned by misinforming the public about real dangers presented to all of us by companies like Freeport MacMoran and other industrial criminals? Can you even consider that your "fact" is a vicious, destructive lie, that realistically people and all our companion species are Really dying all the time, today, not just in the past, because of the pernicious presence of you and your fellow liars? I would love to know your name.
bettbee zenser4 years ago
And thanks again, zenser! I wonder if this is a Monsanto shill or just a person who really, really wants to believe that the big old corporations will do the right thing? (Of course we know that the right thing for them is what will provide the healthiest bottom line.) But against all reason, some people actually trust corporate entities. This is not to say there aren't corporations that have leadership which is trying to do the same thing. There are. But in general, they can be counted on to support management and their shareholders, and nobody else.
zenser bettbee4 years ago
Well, sure. I reckon I got your back, bettbee. It's not so often that someone else handles the tedium of explaining science and biology to a self-proclaimed expert while I sit back and whistle, phew. Well done, I say. Nice. Although, I think the question remains, the very serious question of whether or not this person, posting as TheChemiker, is in fact, in the pay of or affiliated in any way with a corporation which makes or sells commercial, harmful substances, like Roundup for example. If this is a person who is making money by denouncing true experts and misinforming the people on the boards about very real, life-threatening issues...well, perhaps the people who provide us with Instructables should be asked to moderate...it seems to me like an actionable offense, exposing people to this kind of destructive, ignorant message. Shouldn't we defend our right to have truth in our content? In my opinion, we have a right to the truth, when lies like this can and do cause death.
bettbee zenser4 years ago
Hey zenser, Well I don't think we have a shill, I think we have a young person whose father works in the agricultural arena as an agronomist. At a certain age, it's hard to question one's dad and the things he does for a living. I'm sure the dad has drunk the "technological solution" Kool-aid and is passing along his biases to his child. TheChemiker will grow up and undoubtedly learn to question authority and a whole lot more things, and hopefully one day will work out why the world is being destroyed by folks who stand to make a whole lot of money and who have convinced themselves that they aren't doing anything wrong. Denial, as we all know, is not just a river in Egypt.
zenser bettbee4 years ago
TheChemiker, Well, gee, kiddo. Your dad, huh? I didn't know. Guess it just about adds up. On the bright side, you now have the opportunity to ask him some well-informed questions about the lies the "farm industry" put in your mouth (about fertilizer, weed/pest control, gmo foods, to name a very few). Howzabout a tiny bit of accountability? It should make for an interesting dinner. And don't forget to eat your greens. They're probably totally safe. Bettbee, Thank you, bettbee, for so thoughtfully clearing the air and I have been mightily heartened by your discourse. Thank you so much for sharing the benefit of your no doubt hard-earned education with me and any other person who has read your analysis here. Oh, and I'm planning to make this recipe for dessert tomorrow, too.
bettbee zenser4 years ago
Another interesting dinner-table conversation could happen around the issue of whether various people think that food is a basic human right. 

Please note that I am not suggesting that TheChemiker goes home and pose blunt questions on these issues to his dad. But I would suggest that he work out ways to observe what his dad really thinks about the various aspects of his work, and the implications for the future of some of the resulting technology.

TC aspires to work in a related field after graduation from whatever level of graduate work he completes, which I hope goes pretty far. If by then he can step back a few steps and view the parental influence through a more mature and objective lens, he has a chance to really add something to the world. I believe that young minds are open almost by default and that he has a chance to work it out. Plus the environmental situation is going to be a bit more extreme by the time he graduates from anything.

So TC hang in there. Just keep your eyes open and learn chemistry and science, but some other stuff too. Where are you thinking of going to college?
wn7ant bettbee4 years ago
I wonder how many "basic human rights" there are? How many "basic human rights" can any one person have before they don't participate or contribute (because they've been given everything)? I don't claim to know the answer, I'm just fascinated by the question.
Now you are against corporations too? I won't even try to tell you how much corporations have benifitted the US and the world. Very few corporations and buisnesspeople are only out for profit and not quality. But whatever, this is hopeless.
Dear TheChemiker, One day you will have a more complex view of the world. I hope that you will manage to get educated in as many sides of economic theory as possible. I agree that there are some businesspeople out for quality, but unfortunately they often turn a blind eye to some of the unintended consequences of their search for a better product. Also, there are cynical people who do the wrong thing for money, and these people are not rare. I'm sorry to tell you this, even though I do not think you are mature enough to hear me, yet anyway. But you will be one day, and I hope you think back upon these conversations when you begin questioning some of the attitudes and opinions you basically have to hold because of who your dad is and what he does. It would have been helpful had you disclosed your age and automatic bias at the beginning of all this.
bettbee bettbee4 years ago
Ok, so TheChemiker has taken this discussion out of the public conversation which I didn't realize (and don't appreciate.) I've been responding thinking that everything was still in the full view of the forum. I feel I must point out that this is an 8th-grader, whose father works in the fertilizer industry. I hate to do it, but this kid is not being straight with people. Ordinarily I would let it drop, except that he is going around insisting on some very repugnant and environmentally dangerous opinions, by suggesting that he is a chemist and insisting that he knows what he is talking about. Better he comes up against it now than later . . . I am hoping that this person learns to be more forthcoming about his qualifications, or lack thereof, for making certain statements.

Anyway, the insistence on this very narrow point of view, along with the aggressive stance and clearly uninformed arguments, are now explained.

He has just asked me to stop using the term "chemical fertilizer" because it sounds bad, which reveals a tendency to whitewash things . . . I conceded that we could use the term "synthetic" as well. I also told him that chemical fertilizers can deplete soil, which he does not understand. He responded by asking how adding nutrients to soil can deplete soil of nutrients, in response to which I cite the peer reviewed paper at:

http://jeq.scijournals.org/cgi/content/full/38/6/2295

which explains this phenomenon quite clearly. I also brought up the fact that manufacturing fertilizer is an extremely energy-intensive process. I did not mention, but will now, that chemical pesticide and fertilizer usage generally also require both increased irrigation, which leads to soil mineralization and further depletion of the soil, and heavy tillage, which also breaks down and destroys soil.

Hopefully this will be an end to it.
Oh, and properly composted manure and green manures like white clover, peas, lentils, various vetches, medic, and more, are fantastic fertilizers. Check out http://rodaleinstitute.org/new_farm for information on how farms can transition from conventional to organic and make their operations both healthy and affordable, for farmer and consumer alike.
bettbee bettbee4 years ago
PS - many of the arguments that TheChemiker is proposing have their origins in outdated theoretical works like the early writings of Thomas Malthus (who reversed his positions later in life.) His early work proposed that the earth has a limited "carrying capacity" and that the armies of poor and shiftless peasants who were having children at indecent rates would gobble up all the food that the earth could produce. War, pestilence and disease were forces for good, cutting the ranks of the lower classes' population. (Upper classes had "moral restraint," which kept them from succumbing to the urge to have sex and thus children.) Feeding the poor only exacerbated the problem. These early opinions were informed by social movements like Social Darwinism, which sought to categorize people into groups of lesser or greater intrinsic merit by their class and income level.
bettbee bettbee4 years ago
Much of current public policy is based on theories like these, which have their roots in the efforts of the growing middle and upper classes of bygone times to legitimate their own selfish and antisocial behavior. New theoreticians are constantly being produced who are willing to write swill like Garret Hardin's "Lifeboat Ethics" or "The Tragedy of the Commons." Such writings support and legitimate the wealthiest and largest corporations in doing morally indefensible things.
Dear TheChemiker, Your saying these things does not make them so. Please go read some of those links I left for you below. This is going to be a multi-part response because I can't figure out how to make paragraphs and one long response becomes unreadable. But this is an important issue and I wish to discuss it seriously. So here goes. Please reply to the last one where I discuss composted and green manure as fertilizers.
Bottom line, some folks want to believe that the big-daddy agricultural companies know what they're doing because people want to think that everything is going to be ok. It is very tempting to believe that there is some authority figure who will make it all allright, who will work out how to feed the world with some as-yet-undiscovered technological solution. But almost every technological solution in farming has turned out to destroy soil, poison water, make farmers sick, make consumers sick, and leave dangerous residues in foods. The vegetables responsible for the big recalls following headlines of deaths from various bacterial contamination have all been conventionally farmed. More than conventionally farmed, they have been parts of huge monocrop systems. The cows that have killed people with E. Coli O157:H7 have all come from conventional feedlot systems. The same with the "downer" cows that are the source of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. The largest ag companies control so much of certain commodities that they are legally considered monopolies and the government is pursuing antitrust suits against them.
Worse, traditional farming methods like the practice of seed saving are currently under attack from Monsanto in ways such as the underhanded method of planting out its GMO crops and then suing any nearby farmer subsequently found to have seeds containing their DNA - which is spread in the form of pollen on the wind. It is impossible for farmers within miles of these Monsanto fields to keep this DNA out of their fields and crops and seeds. They are also suing the seed cleaners who have been plying their trade for generations, and putting them out of business. The problem is that right or wrong, if Monsanto sues you you almost never have enough money to defend the suit. It's bullying, plain and simple, and it has the potential to create large swaths of lands where nothing but their GMO crops will grow.
So, TheChemiker, you have no idea what you're talking about. You keep making these very aggressive assertions, but you offer nothing specific with which to back up your arguments. I keep answering because I'm afraid that folks may find your simplistic statements alluring - I wish I could just walk into any supermarket and choose the cheapest produce that looks good, but I know too much about how these things are farmed. Not only don't I want chemical residues in my food, but I don't support the environmental costs of their production, nor the subsidy system that rewards huge agricultural corporations over smaller farmers.
1-40 of 73Next »