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Since a few months we have a garden with a small shed/hut! As it's summer holidays now, we intend to spend as much time there with the kids as possible. So it was important to be able to cook a decent family meal. A few years back, I saw this but I didn't have the money to buy it and thought it should be possible to build something similar on a tighter budget, but I had no time to do it. So now I got back to that plan...

Step 1: Supplies / Basic Idea

In the basement I had two BEKVÄM kitchen carts from IKEA. I used them as a base for my very improvised workbench. So no more workbench then...
From my last kitchen build/move I had two pieces of wooden kitchen countertop left, both about the same size (60x115cm). With the garden shed came a gas stove. So some of the most important parts I had already on stock.

The basic idea was to build two units: a sink and a work area/stove base. As for indoor use inside the shed there wasn't that much space. So the units should have a fixed center top with two fold up wings on the sides. The stove cart should hold the gas bottle and the sink cart should get a basic plumbing with a additional tank for used water for indoor use.

To start I had to buy various hinges, plumbing supplies, a new gas bottle, a FYNDIG kitchen sink (the cheapest and smallest I could find in IKEA) and some random kitchen stuff hopped also in the shopping cart while I was hunting for the sink...

Step 2: The Base for the Sink

First I built the sink unit. The countertop was cut down to 110 cm (because of a very ugly edge...), then I sawed of the wings (30 cm each) so for the middle part there were about 50 cm left. Don't forget to mark, which wing belongs where and if you work with a circular handsaw do all your marking and cutting bottom side up!

Then I started to install the sink according to the manual. The cutout was a veeery tight fit in the topframe of the bekväm. Because of this I decided to screw down the top onto the frame instead of using the original ikea metal angles. I also fixed the sink only on the two shorter sides to the counter top. To install the overflow correctly I even had to remove some of the wood inside the topframe to make some room (sorry, completely forgot to take a picture there)

Step 3: Plumbing

I started with a faucet which I had on stock, added some basic plumbing supplies to end on a Gardena plug on the backside of the cart. For those not familiar with Gardena: it's a kind of plug and play system for watering the garden and the company behind it sits here, where I live in Ulm, Germany.
For the outlet I adapted the Ikea thingi to some standard used water plumbing. It took me some trial and error to get to the final version. But now I have to setups. One for outdoors, when the used water is directed into the ground. Indoors the water goes into a canister or bucket (witch has to be emptied on regular basis).

Step 4: The Base for the Stove

The top of the stove cart is pretty much the same as the one for the sink (minus the sink of course), plus I made a notch on the back to guide trough the gas tube for the oven.

For storing and securing the gas bottle I shortened four slats in the back of the middle shelf and resecured them with one of the cut off slats, screwing it to the ends from the downside up. Then I attached a strap to secure the bottle in place.

For child proofing the valve I bought a extra cap and cut a slot into it. It doesn't give absolute security but makes it more difficult for our curious little guy to tinker with the main valve...

Step 5: Finishing Touches and Possible Improvements

Finally I (re-)oiled the countertops and added some (non-ikea) railing (drawer handle) and hooks, bought some additional equipment, which I didn't have in double already, and voilá: The Indoor Outdoor Garden Kitchen!

Thanks to a lot of parts already on stock it cost me less than 100.-- € (new gas bottle included), instead of more than 1000.-- €

After a few times of use it proofs to be very useful, but maybe I will replace the stock wheels with something bigger later on, because moving the BEKVÄM carts over the doorstep and through the garden is doable, but not very comfortable. Also the plug for the garden hose needs to be changed, because in the actual setup it is not possible to place the sink-cart flush to the wall when indoors.

<p>a Bekvam as a workbench, i'm borrowing you the idea! it's heavy and steady and sturdy, i got an under exploited Bekvam and i need a workbench... thanks! :D</p>
<p>I'm glad I was of help!</p>
<p>AAHH ,where would we be without Ikea.brilliant idea and damn usefull as well.</p><p>Too late in the season to make one for me but looking good for a Winter project.</p>
<p>very useful</p>
<p>Great re-use of existing material! I've been looking for project ideas like this for a while. Thanks for sharing.</p>
<p>J'ai faim !</p>
<p>That looks great. Good work!</p>
<p>That is one practical table. Thank's for sharing.</p>

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Bio: I'm a swiss guy, living in germany and working as head of the props department in a small opera house. On the job and ... More »
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