Instructables
PIC_proto_board.jpg
PIC_bare_bones.jpg
Here's a PCB design for a bare bones PIC16F877 development board. All you need is a 4mhz crystal, two 22pf caps, one 4.7k resistor, and eight 470 ohm resistors, a 7805 regulator (not necessarily necessary, read below), and some LEDs (you don't need to put all 33 LEDs on, just as many as you need to debug your programs).

this board is useful for project development because:

= it will show you pin states on the LEDs (if the LED jumper is on) in an easy to read way (the board reorganizes the PIC pins so all the pins on the same port are next to each other)

= it allows easy prototyping interface with the PIC via either (A) the top holes of the wire wrap sockets on the sides or (B) the wire wrap posts underneath

= allows easy power connection

= allows slight expansion on the right side (can put a small circuit there for serial interface or whatever)

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download ExpressPCB (look it up on the net)

download the .pcb file

open the file, click 'layout', click 'order via internet' and you can get three of these boards for $59 total (includes shipping) if you click the mini-board option.

enjoy
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Step 1: PCB description

Picture of PCB description
This PCB is set up so that ports B, C, and D each have their own set of 8 LEDs.
Port A (which only has six lines A0-A5) and Port E (which only has three lines E0-E2) are combined into one set of 9 LEDs.
Each set of LEDs can be enabled or disabled by using a jumper.
Then there are two more jumpers for controlling weather you're using a 5v or >5v power input.

The molex holes lining the sides of the PIC allow one to put wire wrap sockets (cut in half) or headers to be put in. This allows easy connection of all the PIC I/O lines with external devices and the prototype area on the right.

Six of the squares scattered around are for jumpers. One if to let you access the 5v and gnd of the circuit(in case you want to use a logic probe).

There are four jumpers to enable or disable the four sets of LEDs (one LED per i/o line) (one set of 9 LEDs, and three sets of 8 LEDs).

There are another two jumpers (in line with the power input adaptor) which decide if you're using a 5v (doesn't need to be regulated) or >5v power supply (does need to be regulated by a 7805 5v regulator).

The molex holes at the right are big enough and spaced correctly to allow wire wrap sockets to be inserted. You can make test circuits there.

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Here's a Great PIC Intro Book if you need to learn more about PICs.
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lesizz4 months ago

Will this board as-is work with a PIC18F4550?

Do you have a .sch file for this board?

usbg3rd1 year ago
what software are u using ? i am using proteus and it can not open the schematic file ..
leevonk (author)  usbg3rd1 year ago
westfw made an Eagle CAD version (see: http://www.instructables.com/id/Eagle-ize-Leevonk-s-PIC-protoboard/), maybe that will work better for you. I used software from expresspcb.com (http://www.expresspcb.com/ExpressPCBHtm/Free_cad_software.htm).
Thanks
robhlee5 years ago
I have a general question; how do you know how much power to give pic micros? I know for mine (pic16f690) the voltage range is ~2.5 - 5.0 V, but what about the current? Is it generally the same for all pic micros?
jrnk robhlee3 years ago
measure for a while
leevonk (author)  robhlee5 years ago
it should say in the data sheet what the minimum current needed is. You only really need to know this if you're using small batteries to power the PIC since they all use very little current and supplying more current than necessary is never a problem. (you could hook up a car battery to a PIC and would be fine as long as you had a 5v voltage regulator in there). When power supplies or batteries have a current rating written on them, that's the max current that can be delivered, but the PIC (or whatever is being powered by the power supply) "asks" for any current it needs, so being able to supply too much current is never a problem. Hope this makes sense, a lot of people are initially confused by this.
robhlee leevonk5 years ago
thanks, man!
Promethean8 years ago
Hey! This is sort of the type of thing I'm looking for. I'm new to microcontrollers though, and could use a little direction on what may be required for an idea I'm trying to implement: A small, low powered text reader. I know the basic constraints I'd like on it, but have little idea of how to implement it except that PIC or Atmel may be a good way to go. The PCB and MCU needs to be able to support/drive: 1x16 Character LCD 256kBytes (or more) of storage space for text files Interface to load/erase data-- parallel, serial, usb-- doesn't matter which basic control/tact switch for start/stop etc. Could this board design here support that? Zilog also has cheap devkits ($40) for the Encore! line, but Atmel and PIC seem to have much larger communities to seek guidance from. Thanks for any help you can give! (If you see this elsewhere on the site, well, it's a dupe of a message I sent someone else too. Seeking help everywehre, I am!)
leevonk (author)  Promethean7 years ago
this board is useful for project development because

= it will show you pin states on the LEDs (if the LED jumper is on) in an easy to read way (the board reorganizes the PIC pins so all the pins on the same port are next to each other)

= it allows easy prototyping interface with the PIC via either (A) the top holes of the wire wrap sockets on the sides or (B) the wire wrap posts underneath

= allows easy power connection

= allows slight expansion on the right side (can put a small circuit there for serial interface or whatever)

Heliosphan8 years ago
Yup! 1 x Interested in spinach_dips idea right here.
leevonk (author)  Heliosphan8 years ago
nice, how many can I put you down for, how bout 100?
leevonk (author) 8 years ago
I am thinking of following up on spinach_dip's suggestion, leave a comment if you too would be interested in this.
spinach_dip8 years ago
It would be a lot cheaper per board to make up 100 or so of these, probably under $5 per board. I'd love to see someone do that when a good board layout and sell them for $10 each.
leevonk (author) 8 years ago
yeah, woops, looks like I'll have to add two wires, I sent the design to expresspcb yesterday :-P
leevonk (author)  leevonk8 years ago
I just uploaded an updated .pcb file with the correction (added the missing lines and made small asthetic changes)
guerroloco8 years ago
looks like you're missing a trace on port D, third from the top. Possibly also the topmost, although it's hard to tell from the image