Instructables
I needed a way of charging my psp at work, I work in earthmoving equipment where 12v is not always available. So I made this up from mashing up various other instructables. Don't try this and blame me when you fry your PSP - always test the final product with a multimeter and ensure the polarity is correct before plugging in your PSP.
 
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Step 1: Get the goods

Bits you will need......

PSP case
Two old garden solar lights (the two AA flavour)
4 AAA Nimh Batteries
Tape
Foil
5volt regulator link
Shrink tube
Spare wire
PSP Plug

Step 2: Break stuff up

Trash the garden lights remove the solar panels and one of the diodes which look like the image shown. Solder wires onto the solar panels, poke the wires through the lid and mount the panels with glue to the lid.

Step 3: Battery pack

Make up the battery pack, postive to negative to get your 5v, fold up the foil and use it to bridge the terminals, attach the tape nice and tight to ensure good contacts. I used some 9v plugs to make it easier to remove.

Step 4: Solder on

Wire up the diode and resistor as shown in image, make sure they are the right way around (the current only flows one way) before soldering by testing with a multimeter (I had photos on my laptop but my dog ate them), check voltage with multimeter. Put layers of shrink tube on to stop any wires from breaking. Solder on the plug, test and re-test.

Step 5: Enjoy!


Your dog ate photos on your laptop? How is that possible?
mail fail4 years ago
what does solder mean

Seriously (no offense)? It means using a soldering iron to heat up solder (a small tube of metal) and wiring electronic components with it.
knektek4 years ago
you need a switch for power to the regulator. even if it is not plugged in, the regulator will draw current.
beehard445 years ago
I was wondering if i can use the nokia batteries that give around 3.6v if i am not mistaken and use it directly. An added feature is that it can be recharged with a Universal Battery Charger
Tombini6 years ago
although quite complicated and crude Very Clever! How much would it cost in total?
pfft.. i bought solar lights at my local walmart for like 4 bucks a piece.. they are dirt cheap...
Where would you buy them in Australia?
any 'big box' store or discount store.. i am in canada so i don't know for sure
Belleye (author)  Tombini5 years ago
Bunnings?
luketanti5 years ago
If you are using 4 re-chargeable batteries the regulator will not be needed. Total voltage of the batteries is about 4.8v. The regulator at least it wants about 7v. So without it it is better. But nice Idea!!!
smart actually... you never know when something can short and spike the power.. consider the regular an insurance poilcy or food for thought
Belleye (author)  daiatlus795 years ago
4 batteries plus the output of the solar panels would exceed 5v well that's what I thought back when I made it.
LasVegas8 years ago
Without any charging logic, you'd be safer using NiCad batteries for this rather than NiMH that could potentially be overcharged and destroyed.
Belleye (author)  LasVegas8 years ago
I thought any extra power would be vented off in heat, and not a generate that much heat because of the low power output of the solar panels considering they were originally designed for AA NiCad batteries that had no charging logic.
The current of the solar cells is low enough that the NiCad's internal resistance will stop the charging process on their own. The only problem with NiCads is that if you recharge from a partial discharge often enough, they develop a "memory" and seem to run dead quicker. Just periodically run the batteries completely dead. NiMH requires more logic to avoid damage to the cells. Even most consumer battery chargers don't have enough logic. It's very easy to fry NiMH batteries by putting already charged batteries into a charger. You should always let a NiMH battery run dead before recharging.
zapping nicads with a high current like a welder will decrystalize them (thats what happens with nicads.. they crystalize and lose their potency). a welder notwithstanding, something else of high current for a split second can fix it as well.. but the NiMH arent as dangerous as you would think.. the cheap chargers will kill them though if you arent careful.. the good ones like energizer have the shut offs in them that checks them for current
i am hoping that you do not keep your psp in the case when you are charging it... that to me just spells disaster. if you are leaving a black case in the sun for long enough for it to charge your psp wont the case and what ever is in the case get really hot?
there is no more space for the psp. you just couldn't put it in :+) There will be place for some UMD's, though.
Belleye (author)  futbolfreak1296 years ago
not if the air conditioner is on ;)
oh I didn't realize the cab was inclosed
MELEGO3516 years ago
Has anyone successfully done this yet? Any experience? Looks great but i would like some feedback before i try, in case i fry my psp Thanks
yaotal7 years ago
is it possible to use the solar w/o the battery to charge the psp while using the psp at the same time?
well, that might be possible, but the charge to play ratio wont be equal, i think the psp batterie will be depleted if you play it while charging.
Raikengan7 years ago
what happens with the solar panels is that psp runs off the batteries but the batteries need a charger so thats what the solar panel does so the batteries have some "juice" left to run or charge or both the psp or anything that runs off of 5v
bostrees8 years ago
Uh... maybe it's too early for my brain to be working, but what's the point of the solar panels?
Belleye (author)  bostrees8 years ago
maybe it is..... maybe the solar panels recharge the batteries, read the first sentence.
I read through it, it looked like all you made was a battery pack for your PSP, hence my confusion at there being what at first glance looked like a secondary power source.
Belleye (author)  bostrees8 years ago
Yeah would have been better if the first lot of photos had not currupted on my CF card.
chuckr448 years ago
Solar panels alone do not make enough voltage to power most devices, so they are usually used to charge batteries.