Step 4: The Canopy Supports

Now for the fun part, the canopy, this is what inspired it all.   If you go to the following instructable link HERE, it will show you how to make the two upright pieces from 1-1/2" PVC pipe to support the canopy (aka roof) of your tiki bar.

Key notes on making Faux Bamboo:
1.  Make sure you use Acetone as instructed to remove all the labels prior to scoring your PVC (I learned the hard way that if you burn the PVC with the lettering on, it doesn't come off with Acetone afterwards).  

2. I recommend you give it all a good sanding prior to using the faux bamboo technique (easier to do before the bumps are created and you don't loose the burn marks)

3.  Don't cut the PVC until after you've made it look like Bamboo.  The process involves compressing the pipe to get a natural look, and if you cut it first, it won't be the same length when your done.

4.  SPAR Urethane, once you've finished shellac'ing the bamboo, I used SPAR Urethane in a spray-can to seal the shellac, it also hardened it a lot so that if you hit the pipe it doesn't chip as easily.

Ok, now that you've created faux bamboo, cut two pieces 38" in length.  If you want to get creative, I recommend that you also use the technique to at least shellac the two middle top Tee's in the base (as they stick up from your bar countertop).   

If the faux bamboo pipe doesn't fit into the Tee now (because of the shellac) this can be easily re mediated by cutting slit across the end of the pipe using a hacksaw about 1/2" deep.

Optional:  I used an additional two 1-1/2" x 1" T's to create a 1" support across the top of the canopy using the bamboo effect to hang patio lights from,  to do this simply shorten the 38" lengths by about 6" insert the PVC T's on the top and cut a 1" "Bambooized" piece 46" long to connect the two supports together at the top.

<p>I am having trouble finding the 1'22.5 degree elbows. do have any other places I can look</p><p>Thank you Candy </p>
<p>Try http://www.supplyhouse.com/PVC-Schedule-40-22-5-deg-Elbows-15170000</p>
<p>Used the basics of your design to create a simpler bar to bring on camping trips. This collapses down into a 4 foot long, 2 foot wide, 9 inch tall carrying case. It takes up about a quarter of the trunk space in my Baja. I'm going to use canvas w/ velcro to line the outside and I stained and clear coated the plywood top. Thanks for the inspiration! </p>
<p>Looks great!</p>
<p>great work , i like it</p>
I'm in the middle of construction, this is my first PVC furniture project. Right off the bat, I'm surprised how sturdy and stable the frame alone is, even with nothing glued. I'm not going to bother, except to glue each fitting to a tube to keep them all together. <br> <br>I'm going to use plastic primer paint, then the shellac, to get a better stick to the finish. All of the main frame is hidden, just glimpsed through the bamboo fencing, so it's just colored, not bamboozled. I will bamboozle the canopy frame. <br> <br>I was worried I had missed something, because after I had cut all base parts, I still had 4 10 foot pieces of 1 1/2&quot; PVC left, plus about 4 1/2', with just the canopy supports left to do. You only need 6 of them, not 9 as listed.
Where can I buy the roof thatching and bamboo fencing?
I was thinking of doing this project using 1&quot; PVC pipe for the base as well to save a little money and make it a little lighter for tailgating. think this would be ok?
You could probably get away with 1&quot;, the reason I went 1 1/2&quot; was because I wanted the shelf to be sturdy enough to hold a 5 gallon water cooler jug (full of jungle juice). Full at 5 gallons is almost 40lbs, and I wouldn't trust 1&quot; to that. If your looking to just hold some cold beverages though, I think it would be the way to go for &quot;portability&quot;.
Awesome Instructable! There will be one of these in my backyard this summer. Please update the materials list. 8 of the 1-1/2 PVC Side Elbows are required, not 4. Wouldn't be so bad if these were available at the local hardware store but since they have to be ordered, if you came short you would be swearing until the other 4 got delivered and then some more that you had to eat shipping again!
Great catch, sorry about that!<br>
One word: AWESOME...<br>Many words: Excellent job on the instructions. Well done. Can't wait to show this to my friends and family. We've got PLENTY of PVC piping. I mean how cool would this be to break out during a taligate party? Or camping at the river? So many uses. Thanks!
+1 wonderfull
very nice! but i would paint the tubing that is visible inside the roof. the plastic seems to clash with the tiki vibe:-)
Yeah, I was looking to shellac all of those as well, just haven't got quite the far yet, as it will require a lot of sanding.
sooooo sweet! nice work. Did you see my USB Tiki light?<br><br>long live the Tikis!
i hope you all read this Article beacause its very important ..<br><br>http://organicpassion.info/cancer-alert-pvc-the-poison-plastic/<br><br>
That article is long outdated. It was written in 2007 and since then PVC has been proven quite safe.<br><br>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyvinyl_chloride#Health_and_safety
Yes, PVC is a plastic and appropriate caution should be used when cutting, burning or sanding any plastics, one should always wear the appropriate safety masks to prevent enhaling any chemicals.
Good job!!! I have TONS of scrap PVC at my disposal. I will have to give this a shot! Thanks for sharing!

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Bio: Restorer of Vintage Travel Trailers and creation of all things odd.
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