Introduction: PalmShot SlingShot From Recycled Skateboard

Picture of PalmShot SlingShot From Recycled Skateboard

When I fist set out to make a slingshot, I didn't know where to start. What do I make it out of? How do I make it? What shape should it be? Through out this instructable I will explain and show you what to do and how to do it. I am also trying something new, to make this palmshot using as little hand tools as possible and only use machinery. I am using a bandsaw, router, drill press and sandpaper. If you would like to copy this shape, you can search on Google "Slingshot template" and find it. I personally didn't like the one I printed because it was a bit large for my hands, so I free hand drew one to my sizes. Hope you like it!!

Step 1: Wood and Shape

Picture of Wood and Shape

Deciding which wood to use is an important part of any project, especially slingshots. You need a strong, lightweight and thin material. I chose the use a skateboard. I was able to get quite a bit of them after working at a skate park and riding bikes for about 8 years. The reason it is the best wood is because it is strong, high-quality and has some cool colors mixed into the plys. Using HDPE, Harwood, or quality plywood you can achieve a strong palmshot also. You are also going to need a shape. You can print out a shape, or you can draw a shape and make photocopies of it. I drew this like I explained in the first step. It is just something to fit into my pocket easily, yet still have the same grip as you would find on a larger slingshot.

Step 2: Cut Out Shape

Picture of Cut Out Shape

Using some tape, glue, or spray adhesive, apply the shape onto the wood. Then, cut out the shape with about 1/2" of material between your cut and the outline. Then, go around and make relief cuts by making multiple parralel cuts right to the outline. This way while you are cutting you don't have a lot of pressure on the blade and you don't have to back out of a long cut. Make this as accurate as you can, and try to have sides that are as smooth as possible. Next Step....

Step 3: Smooth Sides

Picture of Smooth Sides

I chucked in a dremel sanding bit into my drill press and smoothed out the sides. You could use your dremel, but make sure you keep all your sides at 90° angles.

Step 4: Route Sides

Picture of Route Sides

Now comes the fun part. I used a 3/8" curve on my router table and went around on both sides. I haven't spent much time using a router, so I really can't explain how to use it. (This may be due to the fact that I s.till don't know how to!) If you don't have a router or prefer to have 10 fingers, you can use a rasp. Just remember, this is technically ply wood, so all ways push out from the work. And for those of you who take the router route (no pun intended. Actually, it was.) be sure to take it slow and be careful on the thinner areas where you can accidentally take off chunks of wood. Nexxtttt........

Step 5: Finish

Picture of Finish

This is the part of the process which you can begin to see the beauty of the piece. Sand all the rounded edges smooth, and touch up any machine marks with 100gt. sandpaper. Make sure to sand down everything, including the finish that was on the original wood. Then, move to 220gt. (Or 200) and prepare the surface for your finish. If you will not have a finish, I would suggest going to 320gt. but it is up to you! I then wet the outside of the wood to raise the grain and went back in with 220gt. to make sure you have a smooth final product. Next, I dunked it in some walnut oil for a minute, and wiped away the excess. I don't have great pictures of this process, mainly because there was a delay between sanding and oiling. After all the oils is absorbed, your done! Not really though, you still have to put bands on it, but I still am not sure how to, so Ill probably post an instructable on that later. And please, leave questions or comments and never forget to like!
-Kyle

Step 6: Added Step: How to Hold

Picture of Added Step: How to Hold

After reading some of the first comments, I realized I didn't explain how it is held. It's very simple. Your thumb goes into the larger single grove, and your pointer and middle finger in the smaller two grooves. Then you form a fist and you are ready to shoot.

Comments

philip.williams.7505 (author)2015-03-31

Cool design! I see what you are doing. You are foregoing the traditional "Y" slingshot design and making it more ergonomic and more user friendly! The problem with the traditional handheld "Y" slingshot is the way you lose leverage thereby causing your aim to be off. With this design, you are using the natural curve of the wrist to simulate the "handle" if you will, while at the same time, curving your fingers around the device for a very firm and steady grip. Excellent! How far have you been able to shot with accuracy?

I have was able to hit a can at 15 feet on the first shot.

fraser02 (author)Kyleluvspets2015-07-15

3m?...that's quite close, i think. I can hit a bird at 25m sometimes, with my Y slingshot. Not bad with the small size tho, i guess. I made one without skateboard wood,and it broke almost straight away, after some actually quite good shots. So you have to make sure you use very strong wood, because of the thinner sections of wood in this design. Thanks heaps for the inspiration, love it.

DEEJAY642 (author)fraser022015-09-14

15 feet is 5 meters

fraser02 (author)DEEJAY6422015-09-14

uh...true.

That is not bad, my friend. Keep up the good work!

If you have a stabilizer for the Y slingshot, you can bet a lot of leverage. But without one, it's tru what u say.

kelvsh (author)2015-07-10

really clever! love slingshots and skateboards cant wait to try once i crack my next deck.

Phoghat (author)2015-04-02

With this catty use smaller sjze ammo, probably nothing bigger than .25, or maybe .38 ( 6 mm and 9 mm) and give the pouch a 90° twist when you draw back that will help prevent fork and finger slap

The Manic Puppeteer (author)2015-04-01

Quite the unique design. Did you create it yourself? Very creative.

I used the idea from Google, but actually drew this out.

discostu956 (author)2015-04-01

thanks for updating this with how to hold. It's a lot smaller than I pictured

discostu956 (author)2015-03-29

I'm keen to see how to hold it as well

Leer42 (author)discostu9562015-03-30

Seriously. With a design as unique as this, you'd think that would be a key part of the instructable...

Kyleluvspets (author)Leer422015-04-01

I have included those now! I realized that was a large flaw. thanks for the help!

LunaEros (author)discostu9562015-03-29

Me too. How the hell are you supposed to hold the damn thing? :)

Kyleluvspets (author)LunaEros2015-03-30

This looks like a pretty common question I'm getting. later today I will post some pictures on this as to how to hold it. Sorry! But thanks for the input.

lsutton3 (author)2015-03-31

Why are are there bullets in the.backround

Kyleluvspets (author)lsutton32015-04-01

.223 Remington for our AR15

NathanSellers (author)2015-03-31

Fun project. does it shoot ok? It looks like it might slap against your hand.

Shoots great! Doesn't slap your wrist unless you are using larger shot or marbles

About This Instructable

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Bio: Just a small town boy, living in a lonely world. Follower and disciple of God. I build and invent things from knives to pocket notebooks ... More »
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