Step 3: A bit of prep: juice and plate

Juice a lime, two if they're small. If you don't have a lime use a fresh lemon, fresh orange, or some bottled orange juice. Bottled lemon/lime juice is NOT an adequate replacement for the real thing, at least in this dish. (Ignore the rest of the items in the picture below- they're from another Instructable.)

Set the juice aside near the stove, ready for quick access after the scallops are cooked.

Meanwhile, put a couple layers of paper towels over a large plate. You'll be draining the cooked scallops on this shortly.
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can't wait to try this! yay! it looks so yummy! >_<
great recipe. I'm using the sauce idea for my scallops wrapped in bacon recipe.
If I ever see you guys again (hopefully when Jessy comes), I hope this is there...
No problem, you can just make them yourself! I'll help. ;)
Maybe on the 19th, Build Night, if I come? :)
WOW, WOW, WOW! Canida, this looks amazingly delicious, and easy too!<br/>Next time my mom buys scallops (hopefully soon, if you know what I mean), I will try this out, it looks really yummy.<br/>I just want to print out a picture of it, then eat it, but then ink <em>could</em> kill me, so I'll just have to <em>wait</em> until the scallops are bought.<br/>Great job!<br/>+1 rating.<br/>(added to favorites)<br/>
This looks really delicious! Thanks! Also, I really like that dish from the completed/step 8 picture... which brand is it?
Unfortunately I don't know- they were a gift. The only information on the back says "Made in Japan".
Yum, my mouth is watering already. I'm going to have to try this some day, now that I know how. I first tried fresh scallops at the Fisherman's Landing restaurant in Rocky Harbor, Newfoundland a few years ago, and after becoming a fan of them, I've yet to eat ones that are as good as those.
I just tried this recipe for lunch Christmas Eve. I actually had never tasted or cooked scallops before, so I was dubious as to whether this would be to my liking. It was wonderful. I made a substitution of honey for the agave nectar, but found that I had to add quite a bit to take the edge off the lime. We paired the scallops with a salad drizzled with sesame vinaigrette. This is usually how I come up with a new recipe - I get an idea and start modifying it for my taste (or what's in my refrigerator). Thank you for the great idea.
Sea scallops can be deceptively large. One gets used to a "serving" of half a dozen or so, and then you have these scallops weighing two ounces each, and it's too much; if not too much to eat, it's more than you're SUPPOSED to eat... Hmm. you cook like I do, without much (any?) exact measurement, but phrases like "Add some sesame oil, the sweetener of your choice, and some salt and pepper" can be frightening to the beginning cook (yea, I end up washing the 1/8t measuring spoons when my wife cooks...) In this case, even I am a bit worried about the relative proportions of pan juices, sesame oil, and other stuff. Approximate quantities might be helpful...
That's why most food should be portioned by weight, not that anyone ever bothers. Thankfully when eating lean protein (as opposed to fats, starches, and sugars) it's harder to overeat- you just get <em>full</em>.<br/><br/>You <em>do</em> ask the hard questions, don't you? I don't measure, so when making things up on the fly I'm especially vague on quantities. I'll do my best estimate, though. I added about 3T lime juice to the pan, yielding about 2T pan juices as some of it steamed off. I then added enough agave nectar to take any bitter edge off and make it gently sweet, probably about 1/2-1t, then about 1/8-1/4t sesame oil, just enough to get the flavor through. A dash/pinch of salt and peppper. Taste after each addition, and modify accordingly.<br/><br/>Does that help? Is there anything else I could say to clarify besides give hard numbers? (They would vary according to your particular lime, pan, sweetener, type of salt, etc.) I can modify the step above to take this discussion into account.<br/>
Yes, that helped; thanks. Mainly I was wondering whether you were going after lime-flavored sesame oil (more oil than juices) or sesame flavored juices; either might work...

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Bio: I've been posting Instructables since the site's inception, and now build partnerships. Follow me for food and more!
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