Introduction: Pasta Volgone Nerikomi

Picture of Pasta Volgone Nerikomi

This recipe is inspired by my entry in the Pasta Challenge from last year. Another nerikomi pasta variant, made to look like sea shells. Since they are prepared with squid ink and already taste a bit like sea water, they are served with littleneck clams. If you find the latter outdoors when collecting them at a beach or cliff, these pasta are a great complement.

Step 1: Ingredients

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You need for each serving:

If you made your own pasta before, you might think I left out salt, for my taste the squid ink is salty enough. The amount of clams depends on how many you find at the sea or buy at the market.

Step 2: Kneading

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First you measure the amount of needed flour and put it on your working surface or a silicon mat. Then you build a small flour volcano like in the picture and add the squid ink with the eggs in the mid. Take a spoon and spin the liquids inside while slowly adding flour to the mixture.

If you are interested in more information about making pasta, have a look at my other instructable.

Step 3:

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When all liquids are mixed evenly with the flour, roll it into a ball, wrap with cling film and let it rest in the fridge for an hour. The liquids need to fully dissolve within the flour. Meanwhile you can prepare the white pasta dough just without squid ink this time.

Step 4: Rolling

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When both colours have rested and the doughs are useable (knead in more flour if too sticky), roll the doughs flat out with a pasta maker. Then lay the sheets upon each other like in picture 2 and roll them together. You can use a stick for assistance.

Step 5: Slicing

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Then take the rolls and with a sharp knife you slice thin disks off. Lay them on a floured plate so they don't stick to their underground. Some of the slices need to be pressed into shape, or thinner when your cut was too thick.

Step 6: Preparing

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Take the littleneck clams and sort out those unfit for consumption. Wash them in a colander. Meanwhile cut up some onions, tomatoes and fresh herbs.

Step 7: Let's Start

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Put them into a pan, medium heat, and add some olive oil. They should open up a bit very soon. Take a big cooking pot and fill it with water, bring to a boil.

Step 8: Add the Rest

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Add the chopped onions and tomatoes to the clams, also some herbs. The clams should open a little more.

Step 9: Water Is Boiling

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Now give the nerikomi pasta into the boiling water with some salt. Stir the pan with the clams while you wait for the pasta to come to the surface.

Step 10: Clams Are Ready

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When the clams open up to their maximum they are ready.

Step 11: Degustation

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When all pasta have moved to the surface of the boiling water, drain them in the sink; Toss them into the pan with the clams and serve. This is a well rounded sea food with a nice visual effect that will make your guests speechless. Try it out!

The leftover shells can be smashed into pieces and used in your compost.

Comments

zuMikkebe (author)2017-08-10

Nice recipe, it looks similar to those pasta dishes made squid ink, just a correction to a typo, clams in Italian is Vongole

Joerg Engels (author)zuMikkebe2017-08-11

Thank you. It actually is made with squid ink, this is why I left out salt in the pasta dough. The name is a play on words by the way.

zuMikkebe (author)Joerg Engels2017-08-11

Sorry for my bad English, I meant those "typical" formats of pasta, usually is easy to find traditional pasta formats, even if once I have eaten black ravioli filled with cuttlefish and sea urchin roes... Your creation is very funny and could look like a dish of mussels and clams if the pasta had a depression, think about that ;)

Joerg Engels (author)zuMikkebe2017-08-11

Did you have a look at the original one?

https://www.instructables.com/id/Nerikomi-Pasta/

zuMikkebe (author)Joerg Engels2017-08-11

Yes, but I thought them more concave, something similar to orecchiette but it is hard to obtain with fresh pasta, you need to dry them to keep the shape once boiled

BrittLiv (author)2017-07-26

Wow, it looks beautiful!

Joerg Engels (author)BrittLiv2017-07-28

Thank you!

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