Instructables

Peach-Mango Pie with a Lattice Crust

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Picture of Peach-Mango Pie with a Lattice Crust
Peach and mango work really well together, so why not put them in a pie? And, for the math geeks, why not give in to the visual play of a little π symbol on your pie (especially if it's March 14th )? 

These instructions will yield one 9" lattice-topped Peach-Mango pie, sweet but with a little hint of curry in the spices (I love the combination of curry and mango, since you can take it in either a sweet or savory direction depending on your other ingredients). 

Total time from start-to-eat is about 3 1/2 hours, but only about 45 minutes of that is active prep time. No time like the present to get started, so…
 
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Step 1: Gather Your Ingredients and Gear

Picture of Gather Your Ingredients and Gear
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Gather up the following ingredients:

For the Crust

12 oz. all-purpose flour (I do almost all of my baking by weight, but if you don't have a scale, this is about 2 2/3 US cups), plus additional flour for dusting
8 oz. (2 sticks) unsalted butter
3 oz. cold water
3 oz. vodka
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon table salt

For the Filling

3 mangoes
3-4 peaches
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup instant tapioca
juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon mild curry powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Ripe mangoes and peaches are best. Try to find "freestone" peaches, meaning one of the varieties that doesn't "cling" to the stone. Most peaches sold in supermarkets are freestone peaches (cling peaches are what tend to be sold canned), but ask your produce person if you can't tell. If you can't find fresh fruit, you can substitute frozen or canned here, but you might want to cut back on the sugar a bit if using canned, since they usually have added sugar already. You'll want about 6 cups of fruit, total.

I had a little bit of homemade curry powder that I used here, but any mild curry powder based on tumeric, fenugreek, coriander, and cumin will taste fine. If you aren't big on curry, feel free to omit it. 

Equipment

Along with measuring cups and spoons, these instructions call for:

* a food processor fitted with a metal blade
* a mixing bowl
* a colander
* a wooden spoon
* a medium saucepan
* a whisk
* a 9" pie plate
* a sharp, thin-bladed knife (I use a long paring knife, but a boning knife or filet knife would work)
* a vegetable peeler
* plastic wrap
* a rolling pin
* something to cut a small (2-3") round or dough with (biscuit cutter, drinking glass, whatever)

A kitchen scale is nice to have to measure your flour, but you can live without it.

Optionally, you can also grab an egg and a pastry brush to give the top an egg wash before baking.

ltdaria2 years ago
lovely! I've always wanted to make a pie like this but the pastry has always scared me.

Thanks for this instructable
Very nice. The photos are awesome! The pie looks good too ;-)
pilot693 years ago
Looks Yummy! What is the reason for using Vodka?
djwtwo (author)  pilot693 years ago
The alcohol in the vodka interferes with gluten formation in the dough (as opposed to water), so by taking away some water and replacing with vodka you can use a little more liquid, make the dough more workable, and still not end up with tough pie crust.
pilot69 djwtwo3 years ago
Thank you for the explanation. I shall have a few 'shots' of vodka during the preparation of the crust.

Cheers!
ChrysN3 years ago
Sounds wonderful!