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I did the math and decided pennies would cost less than a lot of other flooring.

Step 1:

I did not want to crawl around on the floor any more that I had to so I organized the pennies in a cookie sheet. I stuck them to a piece of contact plastic and made me some tile like squares.

Step 2:

I got my husband's rolling stool he uses to work on cars, and went backing and forth gluing down the "tiles".

Step 3:

I used a level and piece of board to hold the pennies tight while the glue set up enough to keep them in place. I learned this the hard way. Otherwise the pennies tended to float and spread out were I would have to cut pennies to fit. NOT fun. I tried to grout but with my tight pattern, nothing to grout. Three coats of poly and done. 3 months and $300 bucks later. Just for the pennies, then there was glue, contact plastic, and poly.

<p>Spectacular! Thank you so very much!!!!</p>
<p>Wow. This floor looks really cool. I've seen smaller projects coated with pennies, but not an entire floor. Seeing as not many people really use pennies, tiling the floor with them makes sense.</p>
<p>Last month I visited the new location of Green Man Brewery in Asheville NC and at least one of their large landings on the way upstairs is covered in pennies. Many people on the tour commented on it. It was very impressive.</p>
<p>I get a lot of compliments. The first thing they do is drop down and touch it then then next is whip out their phone for a photo. It is my best project yet for sure. Thanks for your interest.</p>
<p>WOW, I bet that cost a pretty penny. Sorry I had to do it. </p><p>Looks pretty good though. Do you know how many pennies you used? </p>
<p>LOL and quite a few ugly pennies too.</p>
<p>30,000 give or take. Plus 4 dimes in a tight spot.</p>
<p>Nice. I would have removed every penny dated before 1982. Because before that, they were actually made with copper. And they are worth more then face value. But that is just my warped thinking. </p>
<p>I started to but I started to go blind and gave up. I can pop them off if need be.</p>
it would be technically illigal to use those pennies as legal tender after doing this, just so you know, at least in the U.S. :)
<p>Just awesome! About how many pennies per square foot tile? You're right, the cost of tile these days....</p>
<p>324 a square foot. You can use less and grout but I found it easier to butt them up against each other and I liked the look and not having to grout was nice. Plus I liked the different colors of the pennies and grout can have sand that can clean the pennies more that I wanted.</p>
<p>Was the contact side up or down when you glued them in place? I love this look and want to do something similar in my kitchen.</p>
<p>The plastic is just to keep them all together so you don't have to put them down one by one. It is on top and I remove it after I glue the pennies to the floor.</p>
<p>Your directions are not too clear; you made up the &quot;tiles&quot; using contact plastic? What is that?</p><p>And did you flip the tiles over so the pennies were adhered with an adhesive on the floor? Or did you glue the contact plastic side to the floor?</p><p>It looks gorgeous; I'd just need it to be waterproof and durable.</p>
<p>Contact plastic comes in rolls to line shelves. It comes in colors but I like to use the clear so I can see what I am doing.</p>
<p>I just used the contact plastic to get them to the floor. I organize the pennies in the pan, cut a piece to fit, put it on the pennies then flip it over. I would make 5 or 6 and take them to the floor. The would be upside down with the plastic on the bottom. I would squirt the glue on the pennies, grab the plastic by 2 corners and flip it into place next to the last row. I would tug at the plastic and slid it around till it was tight in place. Then I would remove the plastic. The 3 coats of polyurethane makes it easy to sweep and mop. I ring the mop out well and try not to soak it, just in case. I have had it down 4 years. Hope this helps. </p>
<p>this is gorgeous! What ever made you think of it. What kind of glue? When did you do this?--I only ask because I am wondering if the poly (polyurethane?) holds up to a lot of foot traffic.</p>
<p>THANKS! I used the cheapest glue by the gallon that I could find. I did this about 4 years ago. It holds up to foot traffic but the glass table was heavy and chairs would scrape pulling them in and out. So I switched to a wooden banquette before I finally switched to a fold up table.</p>
<p>I need to redo the floor at a lake house--humid with a fair amount of sand. Do you think a rug under the table would protect it.</p>
<p>The wooden table was fine. The glass and wrought iron table was just so heavy. You could not get people/kids to lift the chairs. The metal would scrape and gouge it all up. The wood chairs slide and glide over it no problem. I personally would hate to cover the pennies with a rug.</p>
<p>You may be ably to get kids to lift the chairs. I have no faith that I am capable of that. I can't get my teenage boys to throw things in the trash when they are standing 6 inches from the trash can. I know what you mean about it being too beautiful to cover with a rug.</p>
<p>I took this photo today.</p>
<p>How I thought of it was while I was covering the back wall with paper grocery bags and I was having trouble. While searching on fixes, I saw a place in Paris that had covered the floors and walls of a dressing room in pennies. I had carpet in the dinning room and while searching for better flooring I did the math. Plus my husband had some 5 gallon buckets of pennies in the closet...</p>
<p>I was wondering how you acquired enough pennies.</p>
<p>I bought a lot from banks. I just had to look down the holes in the $25 dollar boxes and make sure they were a mixture of old ones. I didn't want all shinny.</p>
So is the floor perfectly smooth, or textured from the pennies?<br><br>I really like this.
<p>After the 3 coats of polyurethane, it is pretty smooth. Even without the poly, it felt good and cool on the bare feet.</p>
Wow! What a unique look that is worth the time!
<p>Thanks! :)</p>
so I'm curious... did you check to see if any of the pennies were worth in the hundreds or thousands of dollars?
<p>I took all the wheat pennies out but one.</p>

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Bio: I like to turn trash into useful treasures. I believe less gives you time for MORE in your life. I love riding motorcycles.
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