Perpetual Calendar

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Introduction: Perpetual Calendar

About: I'm an inventor / maker / designer based in the Bay Area. My background is in residential architecture, film set design, animatronics, media arts, exhibit design, and electronics. I use digital design and fa...

Instead of buying an unsightly paper calendar every year, take the time to make a classy one that will last the rest of your life.

Step 1: Tools and Materials

WOODWORKING

  • Saws: Table saw for making long cuts, chop saw for making cross-cuts. You could also use a circular saw with guides in place of these.
  • Sanding: I used a belt sander to clean up the cuts and did all the finish sanding by hand.
  • Templates: I made the templates by etching masked wood on the laser cutter, but this could also be done by printing the templates on an inkjet and spray gluing them. The etching saved me the soldering iron burn step, which would be done by tracing out the text with a soldering iron to burn in the text. Another option for the text would be to use letraset transfers or just exacto out the text and use the template as a stencil for acrylic paint.
  • Wood: I used some leftover maple I found in the shop, but any hardwood would do nicely.

Step 2: Cut Out the Pieces

Having etched my templates into the wood, I used the table saw and chop saw to cut out the pieces. If you're using a soldering iron or stenciling paint, I would recommend doing so before you cut out the pieces- It's easier to do delicate work on larger pieces.

The sticks are just over 18" wide, so the calendar takes up a lot of space on a wall- it may be worthwhile to scale it down a bit depending on the wall you intend to place it on.

Step 3: Assemble the Mounting Piece

The base has 3 layers: The base piece, the spacers (same thickness as the sticks with the text) and the top chevron pieces that point to the text at the center.

There's no end grain touching here, so just carefully align and glue the parts together. The most important thing is to make sure the sticks fit snugly between the spacers while still being able to slide back and forth.

Step 4: Keyholes

To hang the piece on the wall, I decided to make some quick keyholes. I started with disc shaped cutouts on 1/8" plywood, cutting them out on the band saw. These give the screw in the wall something to hold on to.

Next, I drilled holes using forstner bits to make cavities for the screws. After gluing the discs on, I drilled another hole below the top of the slits in the discs to allow the screws to enter the keyholes.

With a little filing to get enough of a hooking action, this worked really well.

Step 5: Finished Piece

With this quick and easy project (about 4 hours total without glue drying time), watch the passing of the days in style.

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    93 Comments

    Nice!

    Need to put 3 servo in now :D

    Don't use mobile phone and cant figure out how to do it on the house phone.Maybe buy a mobile but then won't need to make the calender

    this calendar would not be too hard to modify with some means of hanging little reminders or removable/adjustable markers for special dates. Although with this style you could only apply those to the current month

    I am home because of snow on the East coast..running downstairs to see if I have the wood to build with my daughter (she's bored) and this is cooler than a kindle book or mind-numbing games.

    6 replies

    Very good Sir! I like to see that some fathers still have the old fashion in mind. What happened with play with simple things, like wood puzzle, etc. The internet with all this electronic gadgets are destroying the kids mind. Good luck with it and God Bless!

    KUDOS TO YOU FOR THIS POST. I HAD ONE OF MY COUSINSOVER FOR DINNER LAST SUNDAY WITH HER 9 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER, AND TWO OF MY GREAT GRANDCHILDREN, AGES 7 & 4. THEY WERE PLAYING TOGETHER LIKE I HAVEN'T SEEN CHILDREN DOING IN SUCH A LONG TIME, ONLY BECAUSE ALL THREE OF THEIR ELECTRONIC GADGETS NEEDED A CHARGE, AND WE HAD ONLY ONE CHARGER AT THAT TIME, MY COUSIN TOLD ME TO TURN THE T.V. ON FOR THEM TO WATCH QUBO. MY RESPONSE WAS EMPHATICALLY NO. STATING YOUR SENTENCE REGARDING TECHNOLOGY. OUR CHILDREN DEFINITELY NEED MORE PERSONAL INTERACTIONS. AS DOES MANY ADULTS IN OUR SOCIETY.

    Ha. You are talking to an electrical engineer who makes his living thru electricity, but I appreciate the sentiment.

    Sorry, but put in perspective and be alert. The world are changing and too fast. You know what happen with speed, lots of time end up in crash.Don't you worry, it's all out of our control. I'm also an electrician.

    Good call salmansheikh! I don't have kids yet, but I'm looking forward to the prospect of making stuff with them. As my art teacher wife always says, "materials don't lie". There are invaluable lessons to be learned about life through making, for kids and grownups alike

    Nice ible, my grandmother had one of these when I was growing up definitely putting this on my to do list

    What a clever idea. I'll let you know when I build it.

    @ClayW4, I would trust the shop drawing. Stick with those dimensions and you should be good. Please post an IMadeIt!

    3 replies

    What were the angles you used for the "chevron" pieces? And I will once we're done :)

    I added another dimensioned drawing to Step 2. Enjoy!

    Stellar! Thanks!