loading
This is my first Instructables, bear with me if I have missed anything out.

Petzl's Micro is one of the few headlights that uses AA batteries. AA batteries last up to 3 times longer than AAA for the same price that you are paying. Original Micro uses a single 3.7v filament bulb for illumination. It is considered quite bright .... if you are still stuck in 1980s. I will be upgrading this expired light so that it is still valid for use in this era of high-powered LEDs.

You would need:

1) Petzl Micro
2) LED driver (I use 1.5v - 3v driver I got from DX)
3) LED on 20mm star (I use XP-G R2 I got from ebay)
4) spring (I got it from a disused flashlight)
5) some thin multi strand wires that is flexible (mine's from an old earphone)
6) plastic cutter
7) abrasive papers (80 & 200 that is what I have)
8) Dremel tool (optional if you do not have one)
9) some silicone based glue, Goop, E6000 etc.
10) patience and lots of common sense as you will be working with sharp and extremely hot tools which will be dangerous if you have lost your senses, physically and mentally.
 

Step 1: Disassemble the Unit.

Disassemble the whole unit as follows.
The reflector and lens unit is a bit tricky. You have to use some persuasion skills (ie.brute force) to get them to separate.

Step 2: Paring Down the Reflector.

Cut off the end flange which the bulb goes through with a cutter. I tried using Dremel with cutting wheel for the first one but the result did not turn out that well. The heat created while cutting it was too intense that it marred the chromed finishing of the reflector. It is okay if you do not mind it being matte instead of gleaming chrome. Using cutters and abrasive paper later will result in better finishing. I use 80grit paper to sand it flat and 200grit to make it more refined and presentable.

Step 3: Preparing the Light's Body.

This body will house the batteries, LED driver, reflector and of course the LED emitter with the lens unit screwed in front of it.

1) Cut off the protruding part from the battery housing.
2) Cut off the bulb holder and the metal contact right down to the base.
3) File it down with the rotary tool if you need it to look neat. But of course, this step is optional.

All the parts removed will look something like this.

Step 4: Engine & Emitor.

Assemble the LED and driver as follow. I removed the original wire from the driver and replaced it with the earphone wire as it is more limp. You need the wires to be supple as the end result will have the original on/off twisting action, albeit a reversed one.

Step 5: Final Assembly.

Glue everything together as follows.
Do not forget to solder the negative wire to the battery housing unit's contact after the glue has dried. Assemble everything back together, insert the battery and test.

Step 6: Beamshot.

Very nice star-like beam pattern 1 feet away from the wall. The points are not visible in actual real-life use. Spill beam covers almost 180 degrees which is very useful for a headlight.

Second picture compares between 2 Tikka XPs on High mode without the diffuser on. The one on the right is original unmodified with it's Luxeon Rebel LED. On the left is modified with XP-G.

Third picture shows the Tikka XP with diffusers on.

Fourth picture shows the XP-G modified on Boost mode.

Last words: Do not waste your time and money to modify your Tikkas with XP-G. It does not go well with the original lens set-up. Use SSC-P4 or XR-E instead, they will provide better throw and nicer beam. Better still, get a Micro to modify, you will not regret it.

About This Instructable

6,691views

4favorites

License:

Bio: Likes projectile weapons.
More by allanlsw:Mora 748 kit knife. Flashlight diffuser. Making blowgun darts from discarded umbrella frame. 
Add instructable to: