Introduction: Pickled Scotch Bonnet Peppers

Picture of Pickled Scotch Bonnet Peppers

I was interviewed by a journalist last week about my Instructable Gold Recovery, one of the questions the journalist asked was if the one process was dangerous and I described it more no more dangerous than making hot pickled peppers.

Scotch Bonnet Peppers, also known as Caribbean Red Peppers is a variety of chili pepper found mainly in the Caribbean islands. It is named for its resemblance to a Tam o’ Shanter hat. Most Scotch Bonnets have a heat rating of 100,000–350,000 Scoville Units for comparison; most jalapeno peppers have a heat rating of 2,500 to 8,000 on the Scoville Scale.

The hottest pepper in the world is the Ghost pepper at 330,000 to 1,532,310 on the Scoville Scale and is used as a weapon as well as a side dish.

Precautions should be taken when cooking hot peppers as people are hospitalized and even killed by hot peppers, eye protection and rubber gloves should be worn at all times and cook in a well-ventilated kitchen.

This is not a joke; the vapors have been known to interfere with a person’s ability to breath and hot peppers are used as chemical weapons.

Step 1: Ingredients

Picture of Ingredients

Water
White Vinegar
Pickling Salt or Sea Salt
Hot Peppers in this case Bonnet Peppers

Step 2: Tools

Picture of Tools

Safety glasses mine are on my face.
Rubber Gloves
Sharp knife
Cutting board
Measuring cup
Pickling jars I am reusing a Bick’s pickle jar.

Step 3: Preparing the Hot Peppers

Picture of Preparing the Hot Peppers

Put on your rubber gloves and safety glasses first thing and keep them on until you are finished.

DO NOT TOUCH YOUR FACE OR ANY OTHER DELICATE PART OF YOUR BODY WITH THE GLOVES.

When you are finished rinse the gloves off in cold water before taking the gloves off. You do not want to make the mistake of contaminating your hands and then touching a delicate part of your body you will never forget to not touch yourself while pickling again.

Wash the peppers in cold water.

Some people like there peppers whole I like mine cut into rings and I fill the pickle jar.

Step 4: The Brine

Picture of The Brine

Since I am just making 1 one liter jar I will only need 3 cups of brine so to my measuring cup I add 2 cups vinegar 1 cup water and 1 ½ tablespoons salt and stir until all the salt is dissolved then I add the brine to the hot peppers.

For larger amounts just follow this simple recipe.

2 parts vinegar
1 part water
1 tablespoon salt for every two cups of brine.

Step 5: Cooking

Picture of Cooking

Place the jars of hot peppers in a pot of cold water and heat, cook the hot peppers in the jar with the lid on loosely, this helps reduce the vapors released by the hot peppers.

DO NOT BREATH IN THE VAPORS.

You can tell the peppers are cooked when they no longer float in the brine.

Step 6: Finishing the Hot Peppers

Picture of Finishing the Hot Peppers

After about an hour take the jars out of the pot, tighten the lids and let cool now you can take off your safety glasses and rubber gloves.

DO NOT TOUCH YOUR FACE OR ANY OTHER DELICATE PART OF YOUR BODY WITH THE GLOVES UNTIL YOU RINSE THE GLOVES OFF IN COLD WATER. DO NOT EVEN TOUCH THE OUTSIDE OF THE GLOVES WITH YOUR BARE HAND UNTIL YOU HAVE RINSED THEM OFF WITH COLD WATER.

The most common cause of chemical burns while pickling hot peppers is people think food is harmless and then they go tinkle.

Capsicum the active ingredient of pepper spray and hot peppers is neutralized by dairy products so if you do make the mistake of touching yourself put a little cream on it.

Comments

Joe Byers (author)2015-06-04

Nice instructable. I probably have been using too much salt.

Have you heard of the scorpion chile from Trinidad? It is said to excede 2,000,000 Scovil units in the right growing conditions. I am growing them now.

msmith159 (author)Joe Byers2015-07-06

Can you post a picture of the Trinidad Scorpion pepper? I have alot of clippings from friends mixed with some that came from a mixed packet. I like hot, but am not familiar AT ALL with peppers you have to wear gloves with. :-\

Scorpion Chili It is the same family as the Scotch Bonnet Pepper however they are had to get where I live. Good luck growing yours.

raymondlz (author)2014-10-02

your picture shows habenero's but I suppose you knew that?

Isn't that interesting.

The two can look almost identical.

iceng (author)2013-12-04

Good reasoned safety precautions.
Now I understand how you Canadians keep warm ;-)

I saw this video of a teen eating a Ghost pepper
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1KvLOZuvxc

Have a Great Xmas Joe

A....

Josehf Murchison (author)iceng2013-12-05

I liked the YouTube.

Our women keep us warm the peppers just make us hot lovers.

When I eat a ghost pepper at worst I get is the hiccups.

Sometime I should tell you how I got rid of my diddler neighbor.

They are not that dangerous, just people think food stuff and get careless.

Well you and your loved ones have a Merry Xmas and a New Year.

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Bio: I am a photographer, a tinker, an electronics technology engineer, and author; I write short stories and poetry for the love of writing. I started ... More »
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