Introduction: Plain Paper Plane...

Intro...

Although I have followed this site for a while now, this is actually my first indestructible post I thought I had better start with something simple.
It's just a paper plane, plain and simple. Fairly easy to make and it only takes about a minute or so.
This one is more or less the same as any other paper plane except for the fact the wings are a little different.
This design flies relatively smoothly in the air after a bit of fine tuning.
It can have an odd autopilot sort of rocking effect as it oscillates at times when it is slightly off balance as it is, at least to a degree, self-stabilizing.
Although it can be a little tricky to get the hang of using at first, not too hard, not too soft and it helps a great deal if there is very little to no wind.
The main reason for posting this is that firstly I had nothing else better to do this afternoon and secondly and most importantly I have seen too many people try to make paper planes and have them fly terribly. (So this will be as far as I can bare an idiot’s guide...)
I actually came up with this design at primary school for a competition I haven't seen anything exactly like it on the web. (I didn't win anything for distance or time in the air I might add but who knows it might inspire someone)

Step 1: Step One...

MATERIALS:

Find yourself a piece of A4 paper...
                                           I'm using 80g/m^2 - 210x297   (aka. printer paper)

It should look something like the photo.

Tip...
Often the cheapest way to get A4 without "borrowing" it from your mates printer is to buy it in packs of 500 sheets or so, they tend to last a while and be more cost effective than pads of paper. With the added bonus of not having to risk ripping a sheet whilst tearing it out of a pad.

Step 2: Step Two...

With the paper in a portrait orientation, bring the two long sides together and fold it exactly in half through the centre so that the fold runs from top to bottom. Make sure this fold is dead centre and well creased.

It should look something like the photo.

Tip for better folds...
line up the sets of corners individually first by holding them together between finger and thumb, then using your other hands finger and thumb to pinch the paper drag it from the corner side to the what used to be the centre of the piece of paper to make sure the fold is correct. Sometimes it also helps to do this with the middle of the paper too. When you have done the corners and the middle it is just a case of joining them into one central crease.  Use your finger and thumb nails to pinch and slide along the crease when it is 99% of the way to make sure it is nice and tight.

Step 3: Step Three...

Unfold your piece of A4 paper...

Note the nice crease you just made (:

It should look something like the photo.

Step 4: Step Four...

With your new neatly creased piece of A4 paper in the portrait position again, with the crease at the bottom open like a book, take one of the top corners and fold it into the centre fold you just made so that the top edge of the paper is running along the fold. Again make sure it is lined up precisely and score it nice and sharp like you did before. 

Now do this to the other top corner. The two corners should meet in the centre with no gap and no overlap between the top edges that are now in the centre running along the crease you made in step two.

It should look something like the photo.

Step 5: Step Five...

Similar to Step four, take the corners you just made about a third of the way down the long sides of your piece if A4 that you made in step four. (Not the point at the top that is about ninety degrees, the two side ones that are about 135 degrees) and fold them in like you did before so that it forms a smaller angle at the top. As before both of the top most edges should meet at the first central fold you made in step two, with no gaps or over laps and folded nice and sharp.

It should look something like the photo.

Step 6: Step Six...

Fold back along the central fold again, the one that you made in step two, if you have been following and you have folded neatly enough the two half's should line up perfectly. (If not a little tweaking will need to be done to get those spot on)

It should look something like the photo.

Step 7: Step Seven...

This bit can be done pretty much by eye after a bit of practice. (I made a few for fun while I was in the process of writing this without measuring and managed to get it spot on millimetre perfect)

In this step you will be folding down the first step of the wings. To do this take your piece of paper (that is at this point folded in half with a long slope and short flat bit) the point will be the front nose of your plane. with the slope at the top and the centre fold at the bottom (sort of portrait orientation) Measure (at the end with the point) twenty nine millimetres strait up from the centre fold, and put a small mark as a reference were this measurement meets the slop (careful not to damage your plane). This point should be about seventy-four millimetres along the slope and seventy millimetres along the fold from the point of the tip.

Similar to what you have just done but at the back of the plane the other end to the point (the end with the short flat bit opposite to the centre fold at the top of the slop) You are going to make another mark as in step eight but this time it will be six millimetres from the central fold and right at the back. (If you would prefer a guide you can join these marks up to form a line)

Fold the sloped edges down one at a time towards the first fold you made in step two, make sure you fold along between the two points you just made (or along the line you just drew to guide you) make sure that these folds are nice and sharp.

It should look something like the photo.

Step 8: Step Eight...

Repeat step seven for the other side of the piece of paper to make the other wing...

It should look something like the photo.

Step 9: Step Nine...

Half way unfold the folds you just made so that they are about ninety degrees from the slop you just made in the centre. (The larger end of this slop should be at the nose end if things are going to plan) and lay the plane on its back.

Tip...

It won't fly that very well yet because you not finished... don't try it and break it.

It should look something like the photo.

Step 10: Step Ten...

This is where it starts to get a little tricky...

With the plane on its back (wings down, centre fold up) take the short flat bits at the back, the ones that were at the top of the slop and are now at the ends of the wings. Fold them into the fold that you made in step nine. So you are effectively folding each wing in half under the plane. (You do this for both wings) make sure you crease it well.

Unfold the wings again but don't flatten the creases too much ...

It should look something like the photos.

Step 11: Step Eleven...

This is similar to step ten except you are going to use the crease you made in step ten instead of the crease at the base of the wing. With the plane still on its back fold the edge of the wing to the crease you made in step ten keeping it strait and aligned with the crease. Make sure you make the crease nice and sharp.

Unfold the wings again but don't flatten the creases too much ...

It should look something like the photos.

Step 12: Step Twelve...

Basically the same as step eleven but using the crease you made in step eleven instead of the crease from step ten.
(You do this for both wings and again make sure the creases are nice and sharp)

Unfold the wings again but don't flatten the creases too much ...

It should look something like the photos.

Step 13: Step Thirteen...

Attention: This fold is a little bit different...

Almost the same as step twelve but using the crease you made in step twelve instead of the crease from step eleven and instead of folding this one inwards... (And yes it’s supposed to be getting that small) you’re going to fold this last wing section the other way.  If the plane were the correct way up you would be folding it upwards.

After creasing it tightly unfold it again as with the other sections

It should look something like the photos.

Step 14: Step Fourteen...

Now we are getting somewhere but we are not done yet...

Fold all the sections of the wings back up along the creases you just made in steps ten through thirteen. Press them down well just to make sure the creases are nice and sharp

It should look something like the photo.

Step 15: Step Fifteen...

Unfold them again but not all the way...

It should look something like the photo. Note that this is not the final flying position of the wings you will need to angle the first wing section up as the centre fold unfolds slightly on toughing (not too much as the wings close it slightly when in stable flight)  and make sure both wings are identical.   for best results (Note that measurements taken from the back of the plane) about one hundred and ten degrees difference between the bit you hold and the first wing section (about one hundred and twenty with the centre fold held closed), about another one hundred and ten degrees from the first section to the second section and the remaining three folds should be set to about ninety degrees.

Step 16: Step Sixteen...

At the back of the plane open the centre fold and push the end up (so that a small section of the centre fold at the back is inverted) now re-crease the centre fold. So that the fold you just made goes upwards.

It should look something like the photo.

When you let go of the centre fold the fold you made in this step should relax slightly and become about forty five degrees or so.

Step 17: Step Seventeen...

At the front open the centre fold and fold 35 millimetres of the nose back on its self (so that the end of the nose is now inside the plane) leaving about thirty five millimetres until the start of the wings. Now fold the centre fold back up again trapping the end of the plane’s nose inside.

It should look something like the photo.

Step 18: Step Eighteen...

Pinch together the first four or five millimetres of the front of the wings where the wings meet the nose. And fold the wings back down a bit to create a raised arch where the wing meet the nose leaving the rest of the wings unchanged. This arching only has to be slight you may wish to adjust its angle later along with the angle of the fold you made in step twenty on.


It should look something like the photo.

Step 19: Step Nineteen...

And your pretty much done (:

Give it a throw, not too hard if you’re indoors as quite often before adjusting these planes can do some odd things...

If they are really well balanced with a good deal of lift by adding small slits to the back on the main wing section and folding them less than one degree up (that’s all it takes) this design will recover from just being let go from about head height.
A gentle throw with a bit of adjustment will give great results smooth flight and often very efficient flight.


Happy Flying: D

Comments

author
bale11 (author)2014-06-22

doesnt fly so well

author
crjeea (author)bale112014-07-05

It has to be made precisely and thrown relatively slowly in comparison to some other designs.
It can often require slight adjustments to some of the surfaces. One millimetre makes a huge difference especially at the rear of the wings.

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