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For a long time I've had old back up cell phones taking up space in my desk drawer. I was curious if I could put any of these old phones to some use. I can't just throw them away so I decided to try and re-purpose one of them as a portable charger for my current smart phone.

Step 1: Materials

  1. Mp1405 5v 1a Lithium Battery Charging Board (Blue board)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EXGFG42/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

2. DC 3V to 5V 1A USB Battery Converter Step Up Module (Red board)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00C93Z8JY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

3. SAMSUNG OEM EB-L1D7IBA 1850MAH BATTERY FOR GALAXY S II

(If you don't own a Galaxy S II)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007PSBELE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

4. 4 jumper wires ((2) 1.5 inch wires, (2) 2.5 inch wires)

http://www.amazon.com/Pre-formed-140-piece-Jumper-Wire-Kit/dp/B005GYB93M/ref=pd_sim_t_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=1CT2Q151JM4F5PDK7Z1A

Tools

1. Soldering Iron

2. Solder

3. Access to a 3D printer

Step 2: Circuit for Charging Portable Battery

Insert and solder the two 2.5 inch wires to the B+ and B- terminals of the "Mp1405 Charging Board". Each of these wires will be connected to their respective positive and negative contacts on the battery. The "Mp1405 Charging Board" is what will be used to charge the cell phone battery, and will feed power from the battery to the "DC Converter Step Up Module". The Micro-USB connector on the "Mp1405 Charging Board" will be used to charge the internal battery of the portable charger.

Step 3: Circuit for Charging Smart Phone From Portable Battery

Using a 1.5 inch wire, connect the OUT(-) terminal of the "Mp1405 Charging Board" to the IN(-) terminal of the Converter "DC Step Up Module". Do the same thing with the OUT(+) and IN(+) terminals. The USB connector on the DC Step Up Module will be used to connect a micro-USB cable in order to charge a smart phone.

Step 4: Setting Up Battery Pack Internals

Download the STL files at the bottom of this step, and use a 3D printer to create the case for the portable charger. Once the case has been printed carefully insert the charging boards and thread the two larger wires (attached to the B+ and B- terminals of the Mp1405 Charging Board)through the two holes in the case. Make sure the wire connected to the B- terminal is fed through the bottom of the left hole, and the B+ terminal is fed through the bottom of the right hole (reference of left and right holes is based on the second picture from the top). Once both wires have been fed through the bottom of each hole, bend them back so they are fed back through the top of each hole. This way each wire will not move when the battery is inserted, and the positive wire will touch the positive terminal of the battery and the negative wire will touch the negative terminal of the battery. Make sure the two wires do not touch each other.Then slide the battery into place.

If you are uncomfortable about the wires possibly crossing, you may be better off soldering them directly to the contacts of the battery.

Step 5: Finishing Touches on Case

Once the battery is in place, slide on the second half of the case. There are a series of cavities on each half of the case, to make sure the two halves fit exactly together. Next put the cover on the front of the case, to cover the two wire holes. To make sure the case holds together, use an adhesive like Sugru.

Step 6: Extra Stuff

Holes were added to the top of the case to indicate what the battery pack is doing.

- A red light indicates that the portable charger is being charged.

- A green light indicates that the portable charger has been fully charged.

- A blue light indicates that the portable charger is charging my smart phone.

- Also the fins on the top of the case will allow for a key-chain to be mounted.

I've decided to do this for my Sony Xperia L, does the mAh matter much as I've gotta old 3.7v 610 mAh ps3 control battery, would this still work?? <br><br>thanks<br><br>brilliant inscrutable btw
<p>the higher the mAh rating, the more power is stored in the battery, so it would work, but your battery would have 1/3 the storage of the battery he suggested</p>
so I could use a 18650 battery which has triple the mAh of the ps3 battery and it will still work and provide more charge time
<p>the important thing with li-ion batteries like the 18650 is that if it doesn't have a protection circuit to prevent over discharge you want to add one in, it can be damaged or destroyed by discharging below its safe threshold, otherwise yeah it shouldn't be a problem. power is going out through a regulator, and the charge circuit is designed for these sort of batteries, as long as you dont over discharge you can use any battery. i have a pile of 18650 batteries from an old laptop battery that i look forward to using as power packs in robots and RC vehicles </p>
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
you can get ready made protection circuits off Ali express fairly cheaply, for anywhere from single li-ion cells to huge battery packs. just search for li ion protection board and pick one designed for the number of cells you plan to use. so if you're using one cell get a 1s board, if you're using 3 get a 3s board, etc. and be sure to look for one that has charge and discharge protection so you're fully protected. and if it has a temperature sensor for added safety, that's a big bonus. remember these batteries can get hot while charging and if they overheat they can catch fire or explode, a laptop battery can hold as much explosive energy as a hand grenade if improperly charged so these should always be treated with a healthy amount of respect and only charged through propose designed charging circuitry.
Thank you.
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
<p>I to will be using an 18650 battery so I'm interested in this protection circuit to prevent the battery being discharged below, I;m assuming , 3.36v. Is there a ready made circuit or do I need to try and put one together myself. Please excuse my ignorance but I'm fairly new to diy electronics.</p>
Im using an ultrafire 18650 battery which has both re/discharge protection so I should be okay if I never post again you can safely say I blew my hands off
I'm still new to all things electronic been learning the last few years but never went further then standard AA or AAA batteries lol, so how can I prevent problems with discharging as all I'm making it for it to be used as a power bank for my phone I like the idea of having a hand made one rather than a shop brought one <br><br>again thanks for your reply
<p>Yes it will work, but since the mAh capacity of the ps3 controller battery is lower, it will take longer to charge your Sony Xperia L.</p>
<p>If by longer you mean never, then you're right. You can't charge a larger battery with a smaller battery. It will run out of juice before the larger mah battery is completely charged.</p>
<p>Sorry if I was unclear in my earlier post. I was only thinking of the reduced mAh not the overall capacity of the battery. In a system where the power source has a higher capacity for example a car charger, a charger at 5V 1A would charge your smart phone more slowly than a 5V 2A charger hooked up to the same power source. But yes, since the ps3 battery has a smaller power capacity it would not be able to fully charge the Sony Xperia L as you and <a href="https://www.instructables.com/member/weish/" rel="nofollow">weish</a> have suggested.</p>
worked perfectly just didnt last very long lol
<p>Too bad it didn't last very long, but i'm glad to hear you were able to get it working though. If you have a few other batteries, you could probably hook them up in parallel like <a href="https://www.instructables.com/member/luigiparisi/" rel="nofollow">luigiparisi</a> suggested.</p>
I think I might do that as I do have a few of the battery packs spare from broken control pads
How did you do the LEDs
<p>They came already soldered to the charging board and step-up module</p>
<p>Will this work if I used 3x Samsung Galaxy Note 4 batteries and connected them in Parallel? </p><p>If it won't with that many batteries, will a single samsung galaxy note 4 battery be compatible? </p>
<p>Yes either way will work, but if you do hook them up in parallel you'll probably want to wire them in a way that the power draw is even across all the bateries.</p>
<p>would it be fine if i could charge the battery without the charging board instead through the set up module </p>
<p>Yeah if you have a different method of charging your battery, and only want to use the step-up module along with the battery to charge something else it will work.</p>
<p>Great Idea. Now I've got to make one. You have one problem though. I saw at least one cold soldered joint and it could fail.</p>
<p>Yeah your right, I did have a few cold solder joints on this project. I've been practicing though, and I think I've gotten better. Luckily the charger still works though. Good luck with yours. :)</p>
<p>Was wondering if it was possible to use multiple step-up modules in parallel with a larger battery for multiple devices at once. This is the battery I am looking at </p><p><a href="http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/NEW-E40152SE-3-2V-15Ah-LiFePO4-Energy-Cell-Battery-For-Motobike-EV-Solar-System/318150_862219515.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/NEW-E40152...</a></p>
<p>I think it would be possible. It kind of depends on what step-up modules your using, as well as what you are trying to charge. Could you give me a little better of an idea on what your trying to do?</p>
<p>I would probably use the same step up modules you used wired in parallel to the battery mostly to charge phones. Would too many phones plugged in overdraw the battery?</p>
<p>Also would the same charging module work to charge such a large capacity battery?</p>
<p>I would say that having multiple phones probably wouldn't overdraw the battery. I am not sure if the charging module would work with a large capacity though, so you may want to check with the manufacturer. </p>
Brew feel free to make many more instructables.Its always great finding a good author on here. Look forward to your next project.
<p>Thanks James, I'll post my next one in a couple of weeks.</p>
<p>Brilliant idea, I ordered my parts yesterday to make it. (I have a 3D printer and always want excuses to use it). Just out of curiosity though, how does this compare to similarly priced portable chargers such as the one I posted below. If I didn't have so many phone batteries laying around, this would be the cheaper option for me.</p><p>http://www.amazon.com/Astro-Lipstick-Sized-Portable-PowerIQTM-Technology/dp/B005X1Y7I2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1425601709&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=phone+battery</p>
<p>To be honest I would have to say the Anker battery would probably be the better one. The battery cells it uses have a larger capacity, so it will be able to sustain a charge for a longer period of time than the one I suggested. I haven't used this particular charger before, but I have used others and I know from experience that Anker batteries are good quality.</p><p>But you did say that you had more than one battery. I think if you properly hook identical batteries up in parallel like someone suggested in an earlier comment, you can increase the overall charger capacity. If you adjust the case dimensions to match the overall volume increase, you can make a portable charger capable of sustaining a longer charge.</p>
<p>HI BinksBrew, I do really like your concept for this project!<br>May i know is the battery can be charged by power adapter and charging the electronic device at the same time?<br></p>
<p>Yes you can charge the portable battery, while it is plugged to a another electronic device to charge. However I have come to understand that doing this may shorten the lifespan of the battery.</p>
<p>would i be able to switch out the galaxy s4 active battery instead of the S2 battery?</p>
<p>I don't think you would have any trouble from an electronics standpoint if you switch out the battery, but i'm not sure it would fit in the case. I designed the case so that it would fit tightly around the Galaxy S2 battery, but you can download the STL files I posted and modify them so that they fit your battery. If you tell me the dimensions of the S4 battery you want to use, I can tell you if it will fit as is.</p>
Size (LWH): 2.5 inches, 0.4 inches, 2.2 inches
<p>Ok, it looks like you'll have to make a few small modifications to the STL files I uploaded, because the battery measurements I used for the case (including tolerance) were (LWH): 2.289 inches,0.25 inches, 2.062 inches. It should not take you very long to change though since the only things that need to be adjusted are the measurements for the battery holder part of the case.</p>
<p>fantastic idea. </p>
<p>Could this power an arduino project?</p>
<p>I think it possibly could, but I think it might damage the board if the input voltage is below 7V. You could probably do a similar project so you wouldn't risk damaging your board though.</p>
Very neat idea! I have some small capacity older batteries laying around I'd like to try this with. Are the led indicator lights part of the charge board? Or did you add them?
<p>The led indicator lights are part of the charge board.</p>

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