The project name says it all. It is a device that will charge things like Ipods, PDAs, other other devices that plugs into a USB to charge.

Paso 1: Supplies

The parts needed for this project are all in the second picture.

You will require:

LM or MC 7805 +5VDC Voltage Regulator
Type-A Female USB Port
100 UF Electrolytic Capacitor 10-50v
0.1-0.5 UF Capacitor  6-50v (any type would do)
150-160 ohm Resistor (optional)
9V Battery clip
2.2V 20mA LED color of your choice (optional)
Unprinted circuit board
ON/OFF Switch (optional)

These parts can be easily purchased at your local electronic store, like Radio Shack. Or you can buy them online at:
http://www.digikey.com

Regulator:
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail?name=LM7805CT-ND

USB port:
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=151-1080-ND

100 uF Capacitor:
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail?name=P12392-ND

0.1 uF Capacitor:
http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?Detail&name=399-4151-ND

Paso 2: The Circuit Board (Simple way)

The following picture shows the prepared PCB before putting in the necessary components.

What your looking at is the underside of a PCB with the copper foil facing you.
The gray line represent the location where the cut is to be made. Make sure that the 3 sections are electrically isolated (do not conduct to each other).  If you have a dremel tool, you can score the copper cladding with a cutting wheel.

The black dots are the locations where holes are to be drilled.

Paso 3: Attching the components

Watch the polarity when putting in the components, especially the regulator, or it will get very hot and burn out.

*BEFORE plugging in your USB device to this charger, test the charger's output using a multimeter. Hookup the 9-volt battery and measure voltage output, it should be between 4.8-volts to 5.2 volts.

*If the black light comes on when you plug the iPod into the charger, that means the charger is working correctly, and if the black light doesn't come on after 3 seconds, remove the iPod from the charger immediately, and recheck your charger for shorting or incorrect polarity.

*If you double checked the output and still no luck, try attaching a resistor bank described in the comments below to the data lines.

Sobre este Instructable

372.321 vistas

280 favoritos

Publicado el:
Abr 4, 2006

Licencia:

Más de GoodAtIt:

Blowing up stuff with capacitor bank! My Suped Up PowerSupply!