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Materials :

*1 piece of wood (eg. oak) of ~ 80 * 3.5 * 1 cm  (32" * 1.5" * 3/8")
* 64 wine-corks
* wood-glue (preferable waterproof)
* wood oil
* sandpaper

Tools :
* Saw, preferable a jig saw
* Cutter knife

Time : takes about a day to complete : mainly because you need to glue a row of corks, and then wait for the glue to dry.

Step 1: Make a mold

when assembling this pot holder, the corks will be 'squeezed' into the frame. In order to be able to glue everything together (and then keep it that way for a couple of hours) I decided to make a mold.

It is very simple : cut a square hole out of a piece of leftover wood, eg an MDF board. If you want to make a lot of pot holders, you can cut several mold-holes out of the same board. 
<p>Thank you for your nice Instructable.</p><p>Rima</p>
This is such a great idea.
Neat little project, but that's a trivet, not a pot holder.
Well thanks slamonella, as I'm from Belgium, I'm not native English speaking and so I didn't know the exact word for it, but nowI know ! thanks
Your English is better than many native speakers, don't sweat it too much :)
I have a question: how to cut easy the cork? I used a sharp blade, I used a saw blade, but there are 2 problems: cork is kind of elastic material and the friction stops the blade. Thanks!
I added an animation to step 3 that shows how to cut it nice and easy :-) <br>Good luck !
OK, I saw it after reloading the page, initially I thought it's only an image, after reloading, I saw the animation. Thanks :)
Nice trivet. If you lay them on their sides, you not only get to see all the various winery names and designs, but you don't have to cut them.
*versital
Cork is such a beautiful and celestial material. Thank you all for sharing.
Nice! And thanks for adding the video regarding the cutting of the cork with a sharp utility knife. <br>One could hang this or a perhaps larger one on the wall and use as a traditional cork board.
<em>&quot;One could hang this or a perhaps larger one on the wall and use as a traditional cork board&quot;</em><br> <br> <strong>Great idea !</strong> You would need a lot of corks : eg for a 60 * 40 cm you would need ~527 corks,&nbsp; but know that most restaurants have a surplus of corks they don't know what to do with.. So you could give them a box, write your phone-nmbr on it and then wait for a call when the box is full.
this is a brilliant idea. I can imagine the acquiring of materials is as enjoyable as the manufacture of the pot stand. Have you tried auto weld ? <br>It can take quite high temperatures and I have seen some people using it to fix parts in alcohol stoves so will probably be quite good in the heat tolerance area, Worth a try I think
Well, in fact corks are good thermal insulators, so I never had any problem with the glue not withstanding the temperature. To me the idea was simple and straightforward. Still I am very glad that many people like it. Don't forget to vote : I'm in the reuse contest :-)
nice
I made four cork boards this week so I thought I'd pass on some notes. Corks are not all the same diameter although most I have in my bin are the same - approx. 3/4 in. The only glue I've found to be satisfactory on synthetic corks is a two part epoxy, but a hot pot may melt them, so only use natural corks for this project. The easiest way I found to trim a cork to length is a disc sander with a dust collector attached - they make a LOT of dust. I'm going to try this idea, using the wine-stained ends to make a pattern. Thanks for the instructable!

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Bio: Learn - Make - Share --- I am a freelance Designer. If you like my designs and would like me to design or build something for you, feel ... More »
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