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Step 2: Take Measurements

We need 3 basic measurements before we can create a 3D model.



Camera Mount (adapter base)
Measures the lens that came with your camera (see image below for details on this measurement). Be sure to first measure the diameter excluding the three tabs. To do this place your calipers just inside two of the tabs and write down the nubmer. Then grab the lens that came with your camera and measure the small tabs Lenght x Weight x Height of one tab and then the distance to the next tab.  It may help to sketch this out on paper.  You might be able to find some lens measurements on this chart  or you can see if an model exists in Google’s 3D warehouse.

Lens Mount (Lens you'll attach to the adapter)
Again follow the images below to take measurements of lens that you'll be attaching to your adapter. Depending on how secure you want your lens to attach depends on the details of this measurement. I was able to get away with a simple measurement of the diameter of the Nikon e mount and was able to make sure the 3D print would be a simple press fit. (it does not lock in place, it simply presses in place instead)

Focal Distance 
Once you have selected your lens it’s time to figure out which distance it needs to be away from your camera sensor to make clear images. 

Warning: Always be aware that removing your lens exposes your sensor to dust which could stick to your sensor and mess things up. So, be very careful with this next part and try to be in a room with little to no air movement i.e. fans, windows, a/c.

Remove your existing lens from your camera body, then hold up the body and newly purchased lens until the image comes into focus (see images below). This is by no means an exact science but here are some time saving tips. Open your aperture on your lens all the way. In this case I opened mine to 1.8. Use a tripod so you can use your free hand to adjust or measure the final distance once things look in focus. You can also use a toilet paper roll during this step to help judge distance by holding the roll as a makeshift temporary adaptor, slowing cutting off sections of the roll to make it shorter and shorter until you find the correct distance. Once you have a pretty good idea of the distance from body mount to the lens, write it down and head to the computer to draw things up.

Degree of tilt
This is up for experimentation but my current model is using somewhere between a 5 and 20 degree tilt. I seem to get the best results and most range with a 10-12 degree tilt, so try that a starting point.  Here is a guide which will help you establish the perfect tilt.


Looks like a great alternative! Would love one of the spares! <br>Nice work!
just sent you a msg
I voted for you, very clever idea, I also like your movie, well done! <br>When I have some time I will try to make an adapter for a sony nex 5n.
I agree with the criticism, but this is a great place for me to start and understand how lenses work in general. I printed this out for my nikon, and I realized very quickly I had to add an element to it to get it to focus correctly. I was able to get some miniaturization effect, as well I'm able to control a focal plane in the way I would expect from a tilt shifted lens. The key for me was to add an element from a salvaged lens that corrected for the lens floating out in space at an angle. This gives me something concrete to go on to modify to the next step of creating something variable. Thanks a bunch.
I dont want to be disrespectfull, and I have a hard time not laughing, <br>but please explain to me how is it a Tilt-SHIFT adapter, as there is no shifting adjustment?!? <br> <br>Or to be more precise no adjustment whatsoever! <br> <br>As there is no shift, forget architectural photography, etc. and the tilting beeing fixed, you cant adjust your focal plane, so the tilt is useless if you want to carefully compose your frame AND control apparent depth of field, be it for 'creative' portraits, packaging shots, products shots, scenery.. <br> <br>Apart for allowing you to participate in the fad of <br>&quot;hey, it looks like a model train scenery&quot; for everything else, This could be known as 'The utterly useless cone of garbage, with adaptey bits in the ends&quot; But certainly not as a Tilt-Shift Adapter... <br> <br>The other toy T-S adapters geared towards funny photography are way better: <br>You cant really shoot serious crap with them, but for so called creative photography, they give you some control on the effect you produce! <br>This one doesn't! <br> <br>You really should call it a fixed tilt adapter, as it it what it is...
I agree with the criticism, but this is a great place for me to start and understand how lenses work in general. I printed this out for my nikon, and I realized very quickly I had to add an element to it to get it to focus correctly. I was able to get some miniaturization effect, as well I'm able to control a focal plane in the way I would expect from a tilt shifted lens. The key for me was to add an element from a salvaged lens that corrected for the lens floating out in space at an angle. This gives me something concrete to go on to modify to the next step of creating something variable. Thanks a bunch.
Lovely little project. <br>I'd love one for my G3 but unfortunately I'm in the uK.
check out http://hackerspaces.org i'm sure there is a 3D printer in your area!
Very nice .... I have a GH1 and a Nikon F401 with the kit lens that would love that adapter... and ... I also have that 20mm f/1.7 lens :] <br> <br>It gives me chills to see your camera sensor exposed for so long &gt;_&gt; <br> <br>A very nice project, some sort of mechanical join would be more useful for at least a tilt movement, I wonder if a not overly complex system is possible.
Trust me. My stomach turns every time i remove me lens, and see that sensor. Already working on a more adjustable version. Stay tunned!
This makes me want a 3d printer ... great job, it also shows how to make any kind of adapter for a camera... not just a tilt-shift effect one :] <br> <br>Good job, you have my vote!
Hello, <br> <br>Do you think to sell them? I would love to buy one if possible. <br> <br>If it is possible, do you do Canon mounts too? Thank you :)
hey that is way cool I would love one of these I have a GF1 too. <br>I have been looking at these and you are right the cost heaps. <br>I'm in Australia though :(
Great Work! <br> <br>I've just got a new 3/4 camera, and due to lens costs....well, you know how it is, it's just the thing to get the old hamster in the skull working! <br> <br>I've got an old point and shoot camera with great glass, and I'm starting to toy around with the idea of gutting it from the old camera and adapting it to the new 3/4 mount. <br> <br>Any Ideas?
Sweet! You got my vote!
thanks @griffnity <br>
I'm interested in an adapter, and I'll cover YOUR costs via PayPal.
send me a private message with your details and I'll mail you one.
Great project! Love the video.
thanks james!
Nice job I hope you win, because I'd like to see what you come up with next with that printer. What settings do you use when you tilt shift for video ? <br>
Thanks! I rarely use tilt shift lens for video, but I do a lot of time-lapse (take a picture every 3 seconds) which I turn into video later.
I've already built a slider for my DSLR ( Canon 60D ) camera using skate wheels and tubing. I have an intervalometer in the works through kickstarter and I have two other cameras that will already shoot time-lapse ( a GoPro and a Plot Watcher ). What programs do you use to turn your time-lapse into a movie ? Thanks <br>
quicktime pro 7 has always worked the best for me.
Thanks <br>
How many did you print before you got it right ? <br>
Actually the 2nd adapter worked great, but then I printed about 12 more trying to refine the degree of tilt and use less material.

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Bio: Maker of things. Small business builder. Follow my latest project on Twitter @joe_murphy
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