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Step 3: Clean the film adhesive

After you remove the film, the glue will likely remain stuck to the glass, so here comes the messy part.
With some solvent, soften the glue and wipe it off with paper towels.
I started with OOPS, but that was not fast enough so I got some paint thinner.
I found out that if you cover the screen with paper towels and then soak them in paint thinner you can let it sit longer and dissolve the adhesive without running and evaporating.
Scrape off the soft glue with a piece of plastic or wood.
Be careful not to get paint thinner on the plastic frame, because it will dissolve it.
<p>Can you use polarized sunglasses instead of putting the polarized film in the glasses?</p>
<p>I would really like to know as well. I have polarized sunglasses that I'd rather use than go through the trouble of making some. But also, it would mean that others with polarized glasses could also see your monitor. </p>
<p>it depends on the orientation. it will work only if your glasses coincidentally have the same orientation as the polarized film of the monitor.</p>
<p>That would just add to the awesomeness ... looking at a white screen, with sunglasses, with your head sideways. </p>
<p>you can try. polarized films and glasses works in the same way. but glass are great built quality.</p>
<p>Quote &quot;metal won't scratch the glass, unless there is sand or other abrasives on it&quot; Unquote<br>Since when did metal stop scratching glass? That is an interesting statement :) </p>
I think this needs 1 more hack to be really useful.<br>We need to figure out a way to feature an image on the white screen that gets filtered out by the glasses.<br>For instance, if instead of a white screen, anybody without glasses who walked into your office would see a spreadsheet, but with the glasses you wouldn't see the spreadsheet.<br>Too complex, or is it a possibility?
<p>Print a full screenshot of the spreadsheet and taskbar onto a piece of thin, clear plastic. Convince people you can only see well with black and white, so you can make it a real high contrast print. But make sure any lines are thin. Apply this to the LCD, taking care to remove bubbles. Tehn jsut get uesd to seneig waht it looks lkie knid of srecwed up. The brain is amazing at adapting, and there is a good chance you read the last sentence naturally. Look again ^^.</p>
<p>The brightness would have to be kept low as well to avoid drowning out the image of the spreadsheet with light.</p>
<p>Won't work. The crystals in a Liquid Crystal Display polarize the light to one direction or another, depending on their orientation, but doesn't actually block light. But when that polarized light shines through a polarized light filter (the film or glasses), it shows black or white depending on the orientation of the crystals or the filters. Without the polarized filter it's not possible for any image to be seen. The film he removed is a polarized light filter. So basically, he transferred the function it does from the screen, to the glasses. No matter were you place the filter, it will still polarize the light.</p>
<p>Might there be a way to work this into a laptop that has an LCD display? That's what I'd like to take to the coffee shop!</p>
<p>So now we have people walking around (seemingly) talking to themselves, and now we'll have people starring at a blank screen and laughing occasionally. ;-) </p>
That was exactly the image I had of me with one in a coffee shop. What a hoot that would be! And bloody useful too. I just don't have the skills to dig into a laptop display and do surgery.
<p>Yes, laptops screens are made the same way.</p>
<p>If you're prepared to disassemble the panel further, you can flip the polarized sheet which will give an &quot;inverted&quot; color display, like a film negative.</p>
<p>yes it works for all LCD, cellphones and LED's. and TFT screen too. I did in my child hood with small &quot;digital calculator&quot;. None of my friend could use my calculator, But was master then in making calculations using the same calculator</p>
<p>I used to flip the polarized panel over so that I had clear digits on a black background. Some digital watches included this &quot;version&quot; as a temporary trend to look &quot;futuristic&quot;.</p>
<p>It WILL NOT work on LEDs, TFTs, oLEDs, CRTs, or DLPs. It has to be an <br>LCD screen (Liquid Crystal Display), because the crystals work with <br>polarized light &amp; a polarized light filter (the film).</p>
<p>Betty, an LED monitor is still an LCD, it just uses white LEDs for backlighting instead of fluorescent backlighting. LCDs (which use TFT (thin film transistors)) polarize and then twist the polarized light allowing the light to pass through the outer polarized film at that specific pixel.</p>
<p>LEDs and TFTs are both still LCD monitors. DLP is a projector, not a monitor at all. Anything OLED is likely to be too new and very expensive, so I doubt anyone would try this trick on one.</p>
<p>I have an old flat screen monitor is would love to try this on. Is there a way to tell if it is an LCD, as opposed to other types listed in the comments?</p><p>Thanx!</p>
<p>If it's color, then 99% chance it's LCD. If it's an old Monochrome, it may have a bluish tinge to it.</p><p>If it glows green or amber, it's definitely plasma.</p><p>Just test whether or not the screen is affected in any way by the Polarised Glasses before deciding to disassemble.</p>
<p>I think doctors will love this, they can put the xray film on it then use as computer when needed. hehehehe!</p>
Did this year's ago with my calculator and watch - it's cool to see that the same thing works with a color lcd monitor! Nice instructable!
I did this to my watch too when I was in school.<br>I had the only lcd watch around with white numbers on a black background.<br>lcd watches were just becoming cheap and common. that was about 37 years ago....<br>
<p>Yep. You can reverse the polarized light filter too, so you get a negative image. On a calculator with black numbers, they would be white or light grey numbers, &amp; the background turns black.</p>
&quot;Year's&quot;? *shakes his robot fist at his autocorrect*
Lol
<p>Nice idea! One question though, I have the exterior layer peeling off with ease, leaving a nice glossy film layer on the monitor lcd. With difficulty, the glossy display can slowly be picked off in little pieces, revealing a nasty glue ridden surface. So, the glossy screen that comes off in little pieces is the polarized film? And how do I remove it with greater ease? Any input would help. Thanks.</p>
<p>Use an eraser(rubber) and gently clean the screen.</p>
<p>Put a few wet paper towels on it before trying to peel the thing off and let it hang out for a day or so making sure the paper towels stay damp. The whole thing will peel off in one big sheet.</p>
<p>If that doesn't work then try a hair drier to warm it up. Most commercial glues become tacky again if heated allowing the film to be peeled off far more easily when warm than they are at room temperature</p>
<p>Heat will destroy most LCD screens. The liquid crystals in it can't take much heat. Beware some LCDs have plastic, not glass in them, or layers of both. Solvents or paint thinner will destroy the plastic, &amp; ruin the screen.</p>
By &quot;wet&quot; I assume you mean wet with paint thinner.
<p>can it work tft moniter</p>
<p>yes it works for all LCD, cellphones and LED's. and TFT screen too. I did in my child hood with small &quot;digital calculator&quot;. None of my friend could use my calculator, But was master then in making calculations using the same calculator</p>
<p>It WILL NOT work on LEDs, TFTs, oLEDs, CRTs, or DLPs. It has to be an <br>LCD screen (Liquid Crystal Display), because the crystals work with <br>polarized light &amp; a polarized light filter (the film).</p>
<p>Awesome!!!! COOOL!!! What makes the screen white? The paint solvent? Or removing that layer of anti-glare?</p>
<p>The crystals in a Liquid Crystal Display polarize the light to one <br>direction or another, depending on their orientation, but doesn't <br>actually block light. But when that polarized light shines through a <br>polarized light filter (the film or glasses), it shows black or white <br>depending on the orientation of the crystals or the filters. Without the<br> polarized filter it's all just white polarized light. The polarized filter blocks all the light polarized in one direction, but allows light from the opposite polarization. The orientation of the crystals in the display, determines the polarization of the light for that pixel, then the light filter blocks or allows light through depending on the polarization of the light.</p>
<p>One of the anti-glare layers is polarized, and only lets through the &quot;intended&quot; light. Without it, everything bleeds all over everything else creating white.</p>
<p>I love this!</p>
<p>Awesome project...Just loved it. I am definitely going to try it he he...</p>
<p>Awesome idea!</p>
<p>Awesome idea!</p>
<p>Dude, your work has been featured on Ifunny!(or just someone that stole it from here)</p><p>http://ifunny.co/fun/AtYIdyGV?gallery=shuffle</p>
<p> Wow - this is definitely a super spy cool idea.</p>
<p>This is genius to say the least.</p>

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