Instructables

Problems with Wireless Microphones And How To Fix Them

Step 8: Wireless Microphone Brands

Picture of Wireless Microphone Brands
One of the most effective ways to get good wireless quality is to get the proper wireless system for your needs.  If you are going to install your system permanently, hire an AV consulting company to come in and do a wireless analysis.  This is the best way to determine what microphones will meet your needs, and in the long run it will save you money.  If you are using a portable setup, make sure to over-compensate for problems you may run into.

I have listed my opinion of various wireless companies below.

Shure:
Pros:
Name brand company, almost everyone has heard of Shure.  Their cheaper products are good for some applications.  They have somewhat decent sound quality.  Easy to use interface.  Very good digital products.
Cons:
Products made very cheaply, do not hold up well to professional use.  Their analog systems are prone to wireless interference more so than some other brands.  Will not hold up for a portable system.
Bottom line:
If you are on a budget and don't need a lot of mics, get one of their cheaper products.  Also, their digital products are very good, so if you are going digital, Shure mics might be a good way to go.  Don't buy for portable systems.

AKG:
Pros:
Good sound quality.  Name brand.  Reasonable price.  Very powerful.  Easy to use.  Holds up to wear and tear.  Good for portable systems.  Not bad for installed systems.
Cons:
Most of their products will overpower other brands.  Don't buy if you are mixing cheaper brands.
Bottom line:
The best option in my mind.  Just don't use if you are using a Shure or cheaper mic at the same time.

Sennheiser:
Pros:
Fantastic sound quality.  Name Brand.  Best wireless quality between AKG and Shure.  Easy to use.  Holds up to wear and tear.  Great for all systems.
Cons:
Pricey.
Bottom line:
If you have the money get Sennheisers.

Lectrosonic (thanks to jakdedert for reminding me about this one):
Pros:
Fantastic sound quality.  Name Brand.  Considered to have the best quality of any company.  Easy to use.  Holds up to wear and tear.  Great for any system.
Cons:
Pricey.  Probably the most expensive mic out there.
Bottom line:
These mics are mostly used in video production and for productions with an unlimited budget.  If you can afford a Lectrosonic, then there is no doubt that it is the right mic for you.

Audio Technica:
Pros:
Good mic.  Nice user interface.  Better wireless quality than Shure.  Holds up to professional use.  Decent price.
Cons:
Not as good sound quality as Shure.
Bottom line:
Not a bad mic for those who are on a budget.

Line 6:
Pros:
Decent digital systems for the money.
Cons:
Not as good as Shure for the digital.
Bottom line:
Good entry level digital system.

Nady:
Pros:
None.
Cons:
Terrible wireless mics.
Bottom line:
Don't buy nadys wireless products.

VocoPro:
Pros:
You get lots of mics
Cons:
Very prone to frequency crowding, and there's nothing you can do about it since they are fixed frequency.  Terrible sound quality.
Bottom line:
OK if you don't expect to use all the mics at once and are on an extreme budget.

There are other brands out there, but these are the ones you will see most often.  If you have a question about a specific brand, please feel free to ask me.
 
Remove these adsRemove these ads by Signing Up
rosiehall1 year ago
have you worked with capture before? its giving me major difficulty
thegeeke (author)  rosiehall1 year ago
I have not worked with them before; but what are they doing?
rosiehall1 year ago
i am using Shure wireless microphones and 1/4 isnt even getting any signal. do you have any possible ideas for me to try and get it to work?
thegeeke (author)  rosiehall1 year ago
Does the XLR connection work? Sometimes there is a switch on the back to switch between the XLR output and the 1/4in connection (this helps reduce noise on parallel outputs). What model Shure is it? If I know the model I can probably figure it out easier. It is possible that the wiring inside the receiver is damaged or loose. Shure is decent about covering their products... if it isn't a simple matter of a switch, you might want to give them a call to see if they will cover the repair. If the XLR connection works, they will not repair it for free, and you need a 1/4 in connection; then you could get an XLR to 1/4 in adapter. Unfortunately just from what you are telling me, I'm guessing that it is a wiring issue inside of the receiver. If you are comfortable with soldering, you could open the receiver up (careful... this will void your warranty!), and re-solder the connection on the 1/4 in plug, but other than that (or sending it to Shure or an authorized repair center), I don't know of a fix other than checking for a switch on the back, and possibly checking in the menus incase there is an option to switch between XLR and 1/4 in... but I've only seen it in the menus a few times.

Good luck! :)