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This is order to proceed to the collection of carbon rods for my various needs. Inspired by this instructable.

Holy smokes. I'm wearing a Université de Montréal t-shirt with the word "chimie" (chemistry, in french) forming a molecule, and I'm about to dismantle some AA (= plenty of chemicals) with some lab googles that make me look even more like a real scientist. And the overall purpose is to gather carbon and exploit it's properties (high melting point, good conductor) which I am aware of.

Lab report:
Failure, I've only gathered a single carbon rod. Why? Well because I've pryed opened nearly only alkaline and these don't have carbon damit. I learned in the process it's those called "Heavy Duty" (even though they aren't really), more precisley known as Zinc-Carbon battery cell. I learned something.
+1 for the dollar store tip. Worked out really well!<br> <br> Also, if you are looking for larger rod size, I recommend having a look at your local electronic junk store (well, mine is 50% filled with junk....) and see if you can find some carbon-zinc that are odd-shaped or larger.<br> <br> For example, <a href="http://www.binbin.net/photos/generic/pan/panasonic-4r25r-6v-lantern-battery.jpg" rel="nofollow">this 6V format</a> has some longer and a bit larger rods from normal D-sized cells.<br> <br> Also, I went to my local rental store (who rent welding machine and can supply rods) and asked for special carbon rods. Those are unsual rods, and they did not carry those kind of rods. However, I was told to check out some welding suppliers around town that would have many welding supplies, including those kind of rods. Haven't checked yet, thought.<br> <br> I assume welding carbon rods would be way more awesome than small battery one, because welding rods are suposed to handle very high current and very high temperature.<br> <br> Now this i am not sure: I believe also carbon rods are used in non-consumable electrodes (rods) welding. If anybody could confirm this?<br>
actually you can check the IEC Name on the battery before you open it. <br> <br>can refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battery_sizes for the IEC Name. (e.g. for AAA is R03 &amp; Lantern 6 Volt Spring Top is 4R25)
If you live in the US&nbsp;you can find Carbon Zinc Batteries in the dollar store.&nbsp; Their usually sold under the name &quot;Super Heavy Duty&quot;. D&nbsp;cell batteries have the largest electrodes, and you can usually get 2 batteries for $1.<br /> <br /> Dont know what youd end up doing with all the MnO2 though. The zinc casing is useful to experiment with or make your own battery.<br /> <br /> Also, home depot sells welding supplies, Their sold as &quot;Gouging rods&quot;&nbsp;But they have a copper Jacket on them. Their around $8 iirc. Check the welding section.<br />
&nbsp;Interesting, I didn't knew about home depot and those rods. (Although I knew they had some equipment.)<br /> <br /> I planned on going to a dollar store and salvage tons of these batteries. I plan to dispose of the chemicals in a plastic container which I will dump at a local dangerous waste collection. (After all, it's like batteries..)<br />
Yep.&nbsp; No carbon rods in alkaline batteries.&nbsp; It gives you an excuse to occasionally buy the &quot;cheap&quot;&nbsp;batteries, or save the starter cells than come with some toys.<br /> <br /> Although, you can buy assorted types of carbon rods as welding supplies...<br /> <br />
Yes, I tried finding a specialty supply store, but I'm having a hard time. Of course I'd like to have some big longer rods already made, if only I can find said supply store...<br />

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