Introduction: DIY Glass Water Bottle

Picture of DIY Glass Water Bottle

I really don't like throwing away glass bottles, especially ones with resealable tops. On the other hand, it can be dangerous to carry around an unprotected glass bottle in your hand, pocket or bag where you also risk damaging things like laptops, cameras and books.

This is a simple way to make a cover for a glass bottle and turn it into a good looking, practical water bottle. You'll reduce risk of breakage, increase the insulating factor, make it more functional and hopefully improve the aesthetics. It's a great project for those who would like to make their own picnic set or camping gear as well as forgetful folks who are tired of losing $20 water bottles. 


Step 1: Materials

Picture of Materials

 You'll need 

A bottle

Any bottle will work but if you use a Grolsch bottle or something similar you won't need a stopper. That's a great advantage but you can always make a cork stopper or even a carved wooden one and use any bottle you have on hand. For those who don't know, Grolsch is a type of beer that comes in a resealable bottle. It's usually inexpensive and even if you don't drink, it's easy to give away beer. There are lots of other things that come in bottles with wire bales or "swing tops" as well.  They've been around for a very long time. The one in the photos came from a widely available non-alcoholic juice beverage. 

mountain bike or cruiser bicycle inner tube

roughly ten feet of 2MM paracord

an awl or hole punch

scissors or some other cutting tool

a Sharpie

Step 2: Cutting Out the Cover

Picture of Cutting Out the Cover

I didn't make a traditional pattern for this. Rather out the lines on the inner tube itself. It's ultra simple so there isn't much need of a separate pattern. You could make countless variations on this. The cover could be anything from a cut out web to something that covers the entire bottle. One inner tube should be good to cover about three 750ml bottles depending on how you style them.

After splitting the tube(I try to keep these on hand) simply wrap it up the sides of the bottle as far as you'd like it to go and cut it to the desired length. 

Set the bottle in the middle of your material and use the Sharpie to draw a circle around the bottom. 

After drawing your circle make two parallel lines as indicated in the photo. That gives a guide for where to cut out the bottom seam and make a good fit when you lace it up.

Once you've marked where, just follow the lines with your cutting tool so it looks like the images. 





  




Step 3: Punch the Holes

Picture of Punch the Holes

You will either need to use an awl to make your holes or an inexpensive hole punch designed for leather. You can get them for around ten bucks. 

I used a hole punch because it is easier and clean holes make the rubber less likely to tear.

Put three holes on the round part that matches the straight cuts of the bottom seam. If you have a smaller bottle you may need more. Simply adjust as needed and be sure to hold the cover close to it's final shape when you make the holes so they match up. 

Next, simply run a line of holes up each side. These should be even with each other. It's probably a good idea to hold the two edges together and punch them in pairs. It'll take less time and they'll be more even.  

Step 4: Lace It Up

Picture of Lace It Up

Each side will be laced up just like a shoe.

You'll have to guess at the amount of cord you need to do this. Five feet per side is probably adequate so long as you don't want to make a carry handle from the same cord. I didn't do this because I had a shoulder strap laying around and wanted a more simple cover.
 
Just follow the photos and it shouldn't give you any trouble. The rubber is pretty tough but you might be careful when you pull the laces tight so as not to tear through the holes. 

Step 5: Optional: Adding a Strap

Picture of Optional: Adding a Strap

As noted in the previous step, I had a spare strap so I used that but you could make one out of cord, inner tube, leather, some other handy material or simply go without. I can think of reasons you might choose any of those. 

...In this case I just looped the clips through a couple rows of lacing so it'd be secure and less likely to tear the rubber. 


Step 6: After Thoughts

Picture of After Thoughts

Enjoy your water bottle and start looking around at all the other ways you could apply the same technique. You'll soon realize that this would work for everything from hand grips on tools to bicycle chainstays and even clothing. If you can get your hands on some car or tractor inner tubes you'll have even more options. 

Inner tubes are an incredibly versatile material and once cut roll up into neat little bundles ideal for tucking into tool boxes, backpacks or first aid kits. 

Comments

American Ruin made it! (author)2014-09-01
schneb (author)2013-08-25

could put some grommets on those holes, because, hey, why not do grommets? right?

But also, I'm thinking this could be the outside layer, and an inside layer with some insulation (top part of an old, wool sock maybe?) would keep things chilled, a bit.

Neovenetar (author)2010-10-15

It's really awesome, kinda steampunk but what if you trip over on a rock, won't you stab yourself?

dollywild (author)2010-08-08

so cool! I have lemonade bottle I have been saving. Seems like inner tube would make a good sub for leather in a lot of things. I love how a great instructable , such as ths one, sets my mind going for a ll kinds of projects. Thanks!

JohannBloch (author)2010-06-15

GREAT IDEA. I LIVE IN GERMANY AND THE MAJORITY OF OUR BOTTLES ARE RE-SEABLE LIKE THIS. MY HIKING BUDDIES ARE GOING TO BE DIGGING MY NEW BOTTLE. I NOTICE ON THE LAST PAGE YOU SAID THAT INNER TUBE CAN BE USED FOR FIRST AID OR MEDICAL PURPOSES. I WAS WONDERING WHAT THOSE MIGHT BE? I CAMP AND HIKE ALOT AND I AM ALWAYS LOOKING FOR NEW AND VERSITILE ITMES FOR MY KIT.

Culturespy (author)JohannBloch2010-06-15

That's a great question that could probably be answered with at least one Instructable of it's own. In short y as far as emergency medical uses go you can use them for anything from splints to compression bandages and waterproof covers for wounds or a sling for an injured arm. I'd imagine you could think up a lot of uses if you just consider the options that material offers. Just bear in mind that inner tubes don't "breath" and are not sterile. I'm not sure you cold sterilize them either. So, I wouldn't apply them directly to any wound even after a good scrub with alcohol. Best to consult a medical professional about any intended use. As in, do not take my word for it or assume this is medical advice. They stretch, strap, contain... just think about them in terms of not knowing what their intended use is.

JohannBloch (author)Culturespy2010-06-15

YOU JUST GAVE ME A WICKED SWEET LIGHT BULB (IDEA), THANKS FOR ANSWERING MY QUESTION.

Culturespy (author)JohannBloch2010-06-16

Cool. Can't wait to see the Instructable! :)

JohannBloch (author)Culturespy2010-06-28

FAILURE, NOT EVEN AN "EPIC" FAILURE. JUST PLAIN OLD FAILURE. TRIED YOU BOTTLE CARRIER THIS WEEKEND AND LEARNED SOME THINGS THE HARD WAY. BACK AT IT NEXT WEEKEND. HAVEN"T GOTTEN AROUND TO THE FIRST AID IDEA YET BUT IT IS JUST MODEL AFTER A BANDAGE THEY USE IN THE AMERICAN MILITARY. JUST HEAVY GAUZE PLACED AT ONE END OF AN ACE BANDAGE AND A COOL CLIP THAT YOU CAN USE FOR A PREASURE DRESSING. A LOT OF GUYS CALL IT AN ISRAELI BANDAGE BUT I AM NOT SURE IF THAT IS THE REAL NAME OR NOT.

Culturespy (author)JohannBloch2010-06-28

No effort or attempt where you learn something is ever a failure. You just figured out how to do it better next time and will likely learn something I didn't in the process. I'll have to look up the Isreali bandage. If you are using it like an ace bandage remember the rubber doesn't breath. My thought was to punch a lot of evenly spaced holes in it with something like a common hole punch. You'd be making a sort of inner tube "net".

JohannBloch (author)Culturespy2010-06-29

I talked to my medic buddies and they said that the breathing issue wouldn't matter if it was temporary (about 6 hours). They did say that because of the blood and sweat that it may not hold because it would be too slippery. I haven't thought of a good way (or safe way) to test this part. Thanks for the confidence boost. Back to the work bench this weekend.

shooby (author)2010-06-14

Great addition (including sleeve) for a classic/vintage touring bike. Looks really well crafted, good job.

SinAmos (author)2010-06-07

I want to see accountants carrying this around. That is the world I want to live in.

Culturespy (author)SinAmos2010-06-07

Thanks, that's a really nice thing to say. :)

SinAmos (author)Culturespy2010-06-11

I actually found some Grolsch bottles while I was out and about for 1.99 each. I plan on making one of these for my cousin. I'm going to scorch the leather with a soldering iron, basically drawing some artistic designs.

SinAmos (author)SinAmos2010-06-12

Here is what you inspired. I had to do a different style, but still.:)

Culturespy (author)SinAmos2010-06-13

That's great! So cool to see that. Thanks for posting the photo!

jongscx (author)2010-06-09

Nice. I use Sobe bottles b/c they have nice wide screw-on caps...

deofthedead (author)2010-06-08

Holy crap. I've been looking for bottle holster 'ibles for a while- I'm so glad you posted this one! I have a burning passion for bottles (that my dear other half grows weary of my lack of doing anything with, ehehe...) and this is just perfect. I agree with Demon_darkchild about the steampunk thing- Definitely plan to incorporate this into my outfits. The same principles would apply for leather, with minor tweaking I think, and I do have a bit lying around... *goes to dig out her leather punch* PS you rock. Just sayin'.

dZed (author)2010-06-08

Nice. I like the stitching. I carried a glass jug to work for about a year, until I put my bag down just a little too harshly. Moved to stainless steel after that. Been thinking about trying a similarly shaped item out of wool, as it would maybe serve the practical purpose of being able to cool the liquid, as per the wool disc on the side of Boy Scout canteens. Seems like a Instructables contest for inner tubes is in order, like the one that just happened for paracord! Or maybe that's already happened... Good show just the same!

Culturespy (author)dZed2010-06-08

I bet wool would work pretty well. I found this Instructable for making a "coozie" from old sweaters. https://www.instructables.com/id/Felted-Recycled-Beverage-Coozie/ It would be interesting to see a wool felt cover with a vented/cutout innner tbe sleeve over that. That way you could hang it outside your pack and wet the felt for evaporative cooling. Might have to try that!

Jayefuu (author)2010-06-08

Great work Culturespy! Shame I just recycled my collection of busted inner tubes!

mikeasaurus (author)2010-06-07

Might be a good idea to change the title of this instructable from DIY Glass Water Bottle to protective cover for glass bottle (per the url "https://www.instructables.com/id/Protective-cover-for-a-glass-water-bottle/") as you are documenting the casing, not the bottle.

Culturespy (author)mikeasaurus2010-06-07

Yeah, that was a toss up because the title was too long. It's up-cycling a glass bottle into a glass water bottle anyway but I edited the title after the URL was set. Going to have to see about changing it but it'll have to stand for tonight.

Demon_Darkchild (author)2010-06-07

this is awesome! This would be a perfect addition to any rustic attire, but i think I'll make one for my steam punk costume. Thanks for the great 'ible!

Hey thanks! I think I'm going to do another with leather as well. I'll post photos if I do. Hmm... maybe I should put it in steampunk instead of camping.

pie R []ed (author)Culturespy2010-06-07

It would fit well in steampunk. Maybe add some brass to the stopper and it would be perfect.

About This Instructable

23,509views

179favorites

License:

Add instructable to: