loading

So I have a dog now. It would be great if he could run around without a leash. But… what if…? I need a dog tag, but I don't want to put all my info on it for all to see. Wouldn't a QR-code dog tag be cool?

That can't be to hard.

  • I will need a web-adress where the code can sent the person who scanned the tag.
  • I will need a QR-code.
  • I will need a tag that holds the code.

I can do that!

Step 1: You Will Need

Hardware

  • Printer to print your QR-code (or copy shop)
  • 3d-printer to print the tag
  • Computer
  • Laminator (or copy shop)

Software

  • Browser
  • Webdesign software
  • 3D-print software
  • Text-editer

Tools

  • Scissors (cutter)

Oh and a dog!

Step 2: Create Your Web-page

(you can skip this and just put your phone number in the QR-code)

You can make a web-page where the QR-code will direct you.

I used the open source, Seamonkey program to create the page and upload it. This program is very easy to use and install.

You can find Seamonkey here: http://www.seamonkey-project.org

Instructions on how to use Seamonkey is also on that page.

I put some text on the page for the person who would find my dog. The phone number is the most important part:

Hi I'm Duko!
You scanned this tag, so you probably found me somewhere where I shouldn't have been. I hope I didn't do to much damage. If I did, my master will probably pay for it. (He is really rich, you know. He has lots of kible)
Would you please get into contact with my master? I miss him already.
My master is:
Peter Tas
++31 (0) 6 3555 2026
The Netherlands

Now you will need a place to put your page. There are several places where you can get your own webspace. (sometimes for free) I have my own account, so I just made a sub-page: www.myaccount.nl/nameofmydog

You can use Seamonkey to upload the page you created to the webspace through FTP.

Step 3: Create the QR-code

There are lots of websites and apps to create a QR-code. Usually you simply type a text and it will create the QR-code.

In this case the text was the link to the web-page I created before. (or your phone number if you took the easy route)

I used the free QR-code creator: http://www.qr-genereren.nl/url.php

I made more than one code, for the dogs of friends as well.

To scale the codes and combine them on one page, I used a text-editor, but a graphical program would also work. I also used this program to add the name of the dog.

Step 4: Print the Tag

123D-design is a great program to design the 3D-drawing for the dog tag in. (and it is free) It can directly export to STL for your 3D-printer.

Added are my designs for the tag.

Cura is my preferred free software to 3D-print.

This tag prints fast and doesn't use much filament.

Step 5: Print the QR-code

  • Print the QR-code(s) on a printer.
  • Check the size with the tag you 3D-printed.
  • Check with your smartphone of the QR-code works.
  • Cut the code to size. (scissors will work)
  • Check again if the code fits in the tag. (it should be just smaller than the square in the tag)

Step 6: Laminate the QR-code

To waterproof the QR-code, I had them laminated at my local copy-shop. They had some scrap-laminate that was more than large enough for my codes, so it didn't cost me much.

Now I cut them out just larger than the square in the tag. There is a ridge that is just larger so it will stay in place.

It is a bit fiddly to get the laminated QR-code in the tag and you might want to add a drop of glue to keep it in.

Now just add a dog.

Step 7: Add Dog

Put the tag on the collar of your dog and he wears it proudly!

I hope that the tag never needs to be used, but if it does, I will let you know.

<p>http://tagmakers.co.uk/qr-code-pet-tags</p>
<p>Nice idea. Here we just buy a metal tag and have the dog's name and our phone number etched on it. I don't own a 3d printer so that's what I've done. Probably cheaper than having a custom tag made on a 3d printer if I could find one. Since the tag is laminated the frame is only to protect the laminated paper anyway. You could use a metal photo charm too. I didn't know they spelled kible with one b in the Netherlands. We use two bs in the U.S. Kibble.</p>
I didn't make it with the 3D-printer because it is the easiest way, or cheap. I just have the printer and this looked like fun :)<br>The photo charm sounds like a really smart idea.<br>In the Netherlands we do write kibble with just one b: hondenbrokken<br>I do speak four languages, but writing is much harder due to my dyslexia, so sorry for this lost b ;)
That's quite all right. You've done very well with the English Directions. <br><br>I asked because I used to use Moodle, which is an Australian program and it has enrol with one l instead of two. We write enroll. <br><br>So I wondered if in the Netherlands it is kible. <br><br>The redundant letters in English really don't make much sense.
<p>In the Netherlands we don't use the word &quot;kibble&quot;. I do know that there are some huge differences between UK, US and Australian English. We have this in Dutch between Belgium, the Netherlands, and South Afrika which is a language on its own, but stil recognizable as Dutch.</p><p>The Dutch language is as horrible with exceptions on the grammatical rules as English is, so the automatic spell-check is my best friend :)</p>
<p>Ok I would love to know how to print out the QR code singularly. Like if I decided I wanted to have a business doing these tags Every tag would need a custom QR code or even names and numbers. Does anyone know how to print like this. Seems like such a waste of paper to print on regular printer. </p>
I'm not sure what you mean, but printing on a normal laserprinter is as far as I know by far the cheapest way of printing.
<p>I am just wondering how all those dog tags on etsy are printed. Dog tags are customized with names and numbers and such. I have been racking my brain on how they are print those tiny labels.</p>
<p>I just bought myself a tiny laser-engraver, so that might be the way to go, but I didn't experience with it yet.</p>
<p>OUTSTANDING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!</p><p>Simple and yet elegant, and a lot of information to aid in getting your dog back!</p>
<p>This is such a wonderful Idea!!!!</p>
thank you
<p>We made one already</p><p>no icture already</p>
<p>cool</p>
<p>We made one already</p><p>no icture already</p>
<p>Great idea!! You have my vote, Kenyer!!!</p>
<p>Thank you</p>
Cool idea! Thanks for sharing!
Thank you very much
your welcome
<p>I wounder if you could shave or tat a working QR code on a critter </p>
<p>hihi, I'm not going to try.</p>
<p>Because QR codes have error correction built in, you can even put a little phone, email or 'www' logo in the center to let the finder know what is encoded. Very cool idea and use of technology. Thanks for the idea.</p>
<p>I thought almost everybody knows what a QR-code is by now. I use them a lot in my store front. (even one made of LEGO tiles)</p>
<p>Great instructible! Maybe someone without a dog could make one to put on their keys or put one on their phone.</p>
<p>Just don't put your address on the site if your put it on your keys. And if you put it on your phone, your phone-number wouldn't help :)</p>
<p>Instead of your phone number or adress you could use a special email account adress created just for this purpose (i.e. who_found_keyners_phone@somefreemail.com). <br>Only tricky part is to keep that email account from getting deleted due to inactivity over the years and not to lose the password, heh.</p>
<p>Just configure it as another account that your email tool checks on a regular basis. i.e. gmail can be configured to pull from various POP systems like Hotmail so you get all your mail in one tool. It will never get mail, unless the dog is lost, but you will also always get the email when it happens.</p>
<p>And you have to check that mail-adres while you actually are searching your dog...</p>
<p>This is a cool idea. However, what happens if your lost dog is found by someone who does not own a smartphone? I don't own one and I know lots of other people who don't. Then what? We have to chase down a smartphone to find out how to reunite you with your pet? I'm a hard-core dog lover so I would take the trouble but not everyone has the inclination or the time.</p><p>You don't have to put all your information on a dog tag. Just a phone number is sufficient.</p><p>For me, I wouldn't want to take the chance that whoever has my dog has any kind of impediment in reaching me as quickly as possible.</p>
Thank you for your concern. Here in the Netherlands you call the shelter when you find a dog and they will come to get him, read the chip and call the owner. Most dogs here don't have a dog tag but are just chipped. I hope to never need it. Normally a dog doesn't run off and when it does it normally comes back when it is time the eat.
<p>I wonder if you considered what happens when the person that finds your dog doesn't have a clue what a &quot;QR Code&quot; is? The point of having a lost dog is in getting that lost dog back. That's why &quot;dog tags&quot; have become ubiquitous in the world.</p><p>I can see the advantage of scanning the QR Code, but I see a greater disadvantage in not having the readable text of your contact information.</p>
<p>Thank you for your concern. My dog is also &quot;chipped&quot; so every vet or shelter can find me.</p>
<p>As someone who has worked at a few different shelters in the last 12 years, I would not rely on the embedded chip, The strays that come in where rarely ever scanned, and several shelters didn't even have a scanner, The vets mostly all have scanners, but sometimes use them, sometimes not.</p><p>Myself, I know what a QR code is, and honestly, if I found your dog, I wouldn't download an app just to find out who the owner is. The point of a dog tag is to quickly and easily get a hold of the owner/vet. With a QR code you have to download and app, scan, enter code into a website, then get a phone number. With a standard dog tad, call number and done.</p><p>This could work on luggage a bit better, but we run into the same problem that people are not going to give much effort to get a hold of someone.</p>
<p>For what it's worth it does have the dog's name on it and the presence of a deliberately designed tag suggests that maybe you should break out the scanner and check the chip (if they have one). Also, if you can take a picture of the code and get it on your computer you can probably find an online QR code reader that takes images as input. -- Really any of the data could be out of date, so really a tag with the dog's name, the owner's name, address and the date the tag was filled out (reference data that might help someone know to check for a change in address of the person) is the ideal solution. Honestly, since our society says the dog is property the vet/shelter/? should make every reasonable attempt to locate the owner.</p>
<p>That sounds really weird to me. You would think that shelters do anything to get the animals that come in into a good home and the easiest way to do that is to scan the chip and call the owner. I know that's how it works here in the Netherlands. I'm very curious why they wouldn't do that in the shelters where you worked. What is the purpose of those shelters if not finding a good home for the animals that come in?</p><p>Almost everybody I know has already a QR-scanner on their smartphone. And no it is not that I only know tech-savy people. (I'm a social worker you know, so most people I know don't know how to put paper in a printer)</p><p>I do agree with you that when you don't have any problems with putting your phone-number for the world to see, that is the easiest way to get your pet back when it get's lost.</p>
<p>Great idea!</p>
Need this! :)
<p>Or direct them to a facebook page you make for your pet. I've done this :)</p>
Facebook in Holland doesn't allow that.
<p>Great 'ible <a href="https://www.instructables.com/member/kenyer/" rel="nofollow">kenyer</a>, thank you for sharing. I can see the point some are making about not everyone knowing what a QR code is but it can be a tag for anything you want it to be - luggage etc so it's a great idea and generously shared. Besides, who knows what we'll think of QR codes in the future, they may be the norm and anything else considered dated.</p>
yes and QR-codes just look cool :)
<p>&quot;so it's a great idea&quot; imho</p>
<p>Is it possible to 3D print the actual QR code in black and white plastic? I am looking into placing QR codes in our school garden to help identify plant species etc.</p>
<p>If you have a two color 3D printer, that would be a really cool idea. You must print them a little bit bigger than this, or use a real high resolution 3d printer.</p>
<p>Thanks kenyer the school may be in the market for a printer in the near future. There is a push on STEM learning right mow.</p>
<p>Nice...This key ring idea is good also.</p>
<p>thank you</p>
<p>This is fantastic, thanks for posting</p>
<p>Very cool idea.</p>

About This Instructable

23,246views

403favorites

License:

Bio: I'm a social-worker, working with 12 - 23 year-olds. I used to be a printer and I worked voluntarily in Romania for a couple of ... More »
More by kenyer:Stop Motion Puppet Armature Life-size Hamster Ball Dodecahedron Deodorant Powder 
Add instructable to: