Introduction: Quick Skills #9: How to Tie the Poacher's Knot

Picture of Quick Skills #9: How to Tie the Poacher's Knot

Hi Instructables Community,

this week it is time for a new knot project. This one is very simple to tie and if you are a subscriber or read some of my other Instructables you might have seen it being used as part of the double fisherman's knot. This knot can be used as a relatively secure way to create a simple snare.

Users of the mobile app can use this link to get to the video!

Knot Info

ABoK Reference:#1239, #409
Alternative names:Strangle Snare, Double Overhand Noose
Main Purpose:Historically this knot was used by poachers to snare birds and other small game. In a survival situation you could use this simple knot for the same purpose.
Other than that you could use it as a hitch to attach a rope to a carabiner (not to secure yourself though)
Strengths:Simple and quickly to tie.
Weaknesses:Might jam under load and become difficult to untie
Remarks:

Source: Animated Knots by Grog

The Poacher's Knot is one of the few knots suitable for use with new ropes such as Dyneema and Spectra. Bowlines and other familiar loop knots may not be secure with these slippery high modulus ropes and may pull undone, e.g., at loads as low as 15 - 20% of the rope's breaking strain.


Cheers Alex

Step 1: Bight

Picture of Bight
  1. Take your rope and form a bight with the working end.
  2. In this example the working end is above the standing end

Step 2: First Wrap

Picture of First Wrap
  1. Take the working end and loosely wrap it around the bight as shown in the pictures.
  2. Ensure your working end is long enough for this step if not you can still adjust it at this stage.

Step 3: Second Wrap

Picture of Second Wrap
  1. Wrap the working end around the bight a second time.
  2. Again make sure you have sufficient working end left over for the remaining steps
  3. At this stage the two wraps are very loose as you can see in the picture when tying it regularly you would hold the standing end and the wraps in your left hand and work with your right.

Step 4: Thread Through

Picture of Thread Through
  1. Thread the working end through both turns
  2. Start to tighten the knot holding the working end whilst pulling on the loop.

Step 5: Pull Tight

Picture of Pull Tight
  1. Pull the knot tight from the working end.
  2. Pulling on the standing end or loop will make the noose smaller
  3. To make the loop wider hold the knot and pull the standing end through it.
  4. If you left enough working end you might also add a stopper knot for added security.

Step 6: Views & Variants

Picture of Views & Variants
  1. You can test the knot as shown in the picture. If you done it right the noose should tighten properly and even shaking won't open it.
  2. The second and third pictures are top and bottom views.
  3. The fourth picture shows a variant with an additional wrap which is known as the Triple Overhand Noose.

Step 7: Giveaway

Picture of Giveaway

You can win one of three Let's Prep "Tinder" Skill Builder Kits including a 3-Month Instructables Pro Account.

The kit shown is the current work in progress of the Skill Builder kit which includes a number of natural and synthetic materials. The whole concept is still very much in development and I will publish Instructables & videos accordingly once I know where I really want to go with this.

All you have to do is to subscribe to my YouTube channel and leave me a comment at this video and include "I want to go out and learn something new!" & your Instructables username. You have until the 15th May 2016 1800 GMT to participate after which I will announce the winners on my FB, Twitter & Blog. (Only entries from the EU, Norway, Switzerland, USA & Canada are eligible to get the full package mailed (please understand that I pay for this myself), residents of other countries may only receive the Pro-Account).

Comments

gareth.collier.1985 (author)2016-05-13

This looks like the same knot I ise for fishing called a double blood knot is what I was taught as a kid.
Correct me if I'm wrong as I know a lot of knots have more than one name depending where your from.

Hi gareth.collier.1985,

from what I understand the double blood knot is a bend (i.e. a knot that is used to connect two ropes, lines, strings to each other) the poacher's knot on the opposite would be considered a hitch. However if you use two poacher's knots to connect two ropes you create a double fisherman's bend (Which looks similar to the double blood knot).

Cheers Alex

rfox4 (author)Alex 2Q2016-05-26

from pocket ref 4th edition by thomas j. glover under blood knot: a common fishing knot which joins two lines of equal diameter together. (page 585)

gm280 (author)2016-05-13

gareth, I was thinking the same thing. But a double blood knot doesn't allow you to cinch it down tightly and then slide it open again. So it my not be the exact same. JMHO! IDK.

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