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Table of Contents:

  1. What you'll need
  2. What does a Rabbit Box Trap do?
  3. Contract
  4. Rough Sketchs
  5. Getting Started: Wood Boards
  6. PVC Pipe and Paracord
  7. Bill of Materials
  8. Putting It All Together
  9. Finished Project
  10. Reflection

Step 1: What You'll Need:

  1. 2 1"x 6"x 6' boards (can be any wood type)
  2. 1 piece of 1/2"x 36" PVC pipe
  3. 1 pack of 1/8"x 50' paracord
  4. 1 25 count pack of flat, Philips-head wood screws (any brand)
  5. 1 regular paint brush
  6. 1 quart can of clear wood sealant (any brand)
  7. 1 quart can of forest green paint (any brand)

Step 2: What Does a Rabbit Box Trap Do?

A rabbit box trap is simply what it sounds like, a box that traps rabbits. The trap is simply a box with a trigger system that uses the weight of a suspended trapdoor to enclose the rabbit inside the box once the rabbit bumps the trigger system. This box trap is better than some of the other types of rabbit traps because it does not cause physical harm to the animal, and can be used numerous ways besides hunting and trapping. You can use a box trap for educational purposes, by catching the rabbit and using it to teach people about wild rabbits, or for research purposes, since the trap does not alter or harm the rabbit in any way.

Step 3: Contract

Step 4: Rough Sketches

Step 5: Getting Started: Wood Boards

The most important piece to the box trap trap is the wood, so make sure your boards are relatively free of knots or splits. If bowed, strategically cut and select sections for certain parts of the box.

*IMPORTANT: always double check measurements, no one is perfect so it is important to have correct measurements to not waste material.

  1. Use T-square to mark a straight line across the width of the boards about 1/2" from each end of the boards, and cut the boards along these lines. (Doing this ensures that the ends of the board will be square, making measurements more consistent)
  2. Measure 20" from the end of the board and make a mark, and use the T-square to mark a straight line along the width of the board at the mark. Then cut the board along this line. (Repeat this step 2 more times, and go ahead and label the front, rear, top, and bottom of each 20" board)
  3. Measure 17 3/4" from the end of the board and make a mark, and use the T-square to mark a straight line along the width of the board. Then cut the board along this line. (Use a pencil and mark this piece as the top of the box, and go ahead and label the front and rear of the board)

Top Box Board

  1. Once the the top piece is cut, measure to find the true center of the board (as board width may range from 5 1/2" to 6 1/2"). When center is found, use T-square to draw a line of center along the whole length of the board.
  2. Next, measure from the rear of the board along the centerline 4" and make a mark.
  3. Then take the board and use a drill press (or hand-held drill if you do not have access to a drill press) and use a 1" speed bore bit to drill a 1" hole on your all the way through. (Make sure you have backing to prevent blowback and clamp down your piece before you drill)
  4. Once done, measure from the back of the board along the centerline and make a mark. Then use a T-square to draw a line across the width of the board at the mark. Then measure along the line from the centerline 3/8" on both sides and make a mark.
  5. Then take the board and use a 9/64" drill bit and pre-drill holes on the marks you just made.
  6. Once done, then measure 3/8" from each side of the board and make a mark. Then use a T-square to mark a straight line along the whole length of the board. Then measure from the front of the board along the lines and make marks at 1", 9", and 18".
  7. Then take the board and use a 9/64" drill bit and pre-drill holes on the marks.
  8. Once finished, take your top board and measure 1 1/4" from the sides in the center on the rear of the board and make marks.
  9. Then take the board and use a 9/64" drill bit and drill 1/2" into the board.

Side Boards

  1. Designate two of the 20" boards to be side boards.
  2. After you designate the 2 boards, turn the boards up on their sides (where they will have the 1" side on the worktable) and designate a top and bottom of both boards.
  3. Once you designate the top, measure 5/8", 3", 11", 18" from the front and in the center of the top, and mark your marks.
  4. After your marks are made, take a 9/64" drill bit and drill 1/2" into the board.
  5. Once you're done with the top of the boards, do the same steps on the bottom of the boards but make your marks at 5/8", 6 1/2", 13 1/2", and 19 3/8".
  6. After you make your marks on the bottom, take a 9/64" drill bit and drill 1/2" into the board.
  7. Once you're done with the bottom of the board, go to the rear and measure *** from the top along the centerline of the rear, and then make your marks.
  8. After making your marks, use the 9/64" drill bit and drill 1/2" into the board.

Bottom Board

  1. Measure 3/8" from both sides of the board, and use the T-square to draw a line along the the whole length of the board on both sides.
  2. Once you've drawn the lines, measure 5/8", 6 1/2", 13 1/2", and 19 3/8" from the front of the board along the lines, and make your marks.
  3. After your marks are made, use the 9/64" drill bit and drill through the board.
  4. Then measure 1 1/4" from the sides in the center on the rear of the board and make your marks.
  5. After you make your marks, use the 9/64" drill bit and drill 1/2" into the board.
  6. Once you've drilled the holes, measure 1 1/4" and 2 1/4" from the front of the board use a T-square to draw lines across the width of the board at both measurements.
  7. Then measure 1" from the sides to make a rectangle 4" x 1"
  8. After making the rectangle, take a wood router and rout out the rectangle 1/2" deep.
  9. Once done routing, use a wood chisel to clean out and get rid of access wood.

Back of the Box

  1. Take left over board and cut 6" wide x 8" tall rectangle.
  2. Measure 3/8" off of the sides and top and bottom of the board and use a T-square to draw lines along the marks.
  3. Then measure 1 1/4" from each side on the top and the bottom and make marks.
  4. Next, take a 9/64" drill bit and drill through the board on the marks
  5. After you're done drilling, measure 4" down from the top of the back along the side lines and make a mark.
  6. Then take a 9/64" drill bit and drill through the board on the marks.

Trapdoor

  1. Take left over board and cut out a 7 1/2" long x 4" wide rectangle.
  2. Then measure 3/8" from the top and use a T-square to draw a line across the width of the trapdoor.
  3. Next, measure 2" from one of the sides along the line and make a mark.
  4. Then take a 9/64" drill bit and drill through the board.

Support Arm

  1. Take left over board and cut out a 9" long x 1 1/4" wide rectangle.
  2. Use a compass on one end and make a curve with the vertex 1/2" from the top.
  3. Then use a band saw to cut out the curve.
  4. Next, on the bottom of the support arm measure 1/4" from the sides and make your marks.
  5. Then, take a 9/64" drill bit and drill into the arm 1/2"

Trigger Stick

  1. For the trigger stick, take a board and cut a 5 1/2" long x 1/2" wide strip.
  2. Then measure about 1 1/2" from the top and make a mark.
  3. Next measure, 1 3/8" below that mark and make another mark.
  4. On the lower mark, cut into the strip 1/4", then cut from the upper mark down to the end of the 1/4" cut, making a notch.
  5. Next, on the backside of the trigger stick measure 3/8" from the top a make a mark.
  6. Then use a 7/32" drill bit and drill through the stick.

Step 6: PVC Pipe and Paracord

PVC Pipe

  1. Measure 15 inches from one end of the pipe and make a mark.
  2. Next, use a hacksaw and cut the PVC on your mark.
  3. Once cut, measure 1/2" from each end and make marks that are aligned.
  4. Then take a 7/32 drill bit and drill straight through the pipe

Paracord

  1. Cut and trim as needed.

Step 7: Bill of Materials

2 1"x 6"x 6' boards (can be any wood type, but pine is what I used)

$22.88 ($11.44 for each board)

1 piece of 1/2"x 36" PVC pipe

$2.98

1 pack of 1/8"x 50' paracord

$3.98

1 25 count pack of flat, Philips-head wood screws (any brand)

$1.94 (approximately $0.08 a screw)

1 regular paint brush

$6.95

1 quart can of clear wood sealant (any brand)

$21.47

1 quart can of forest green paint (any brand)

$24.79

SUBTOTAL: $84.99

TOTAL: $90.94

Step 8: Putting It All Together

  1. Take the bottom and the two side boards and make sure the pre-drilled holes align by using an ice pick or thin screwdriver.
  2. Once the holes are aligned, take one wood screw at a time and carefully screw the boards together.
  3. After you screw the bottom and side boards together, take the front trapdoor guide bar and make sure the pre-drilled holes align on the front of the top of the side boards using the ice pick or thin screwdriver
  4. Once the holes are aligned, carefully screw the guide bar down.
  5. After your guide bar is attached, take your support arm and position it on the top board, aligning it with the two holes you pre-drilled.
  6. Once aligned, carefully screw together the support arm and the top board together.
  7. After the top board and support arm are screwed together, take the top board (with the support arm facing up) and align its pre-drilled holes with the pre-drilled holes in the top of the side boards.
  8. Once aligned, carefully screw the top board to the side boards.
  9. After screwing together the top and the side boards, take the back of the box and align its pre-drilled holes with the pre-drilled holes on the rear of the top, side, and bottom boards.
  10. Once aligned, carefully screw the back of the box to the rear of the top, side, and bottom boards.
  11. Then take sand paper or palm sander and completely sand the box.
  12. Once done sanding the box, take clear wood sealant and apply coats of sealant as needed to lessen the likelihood of wood rot.
  13. While the sealant dries, you can chose to paint/camouflage your PVC balance arm or leave it plain.
  14. Next, take the PVC pipe and feed paracord through the pre-drilled holes and tie a knot on the top side.
  15. Then take the trigger stick and trapdoor and feed the paracord through the pre-drilled holes.
  16. Next, adjust the paracord length to match your mark on your trap door to the top of the top board and make a knot.
  17. Then adjust the paracord length to so that trigger stick is set in the trigger hole while the trapdoor is raised up.
  18. Once done, adjust PVC balance arm to make sure trapdoor can fall straight into routed groove in bottom board.
  19. GO TRAP YOU A RABBIT!!!

Step 9: Finished Product

Step 10: Reflection

This project taught me a lot of new skills, and advanced some old ones. From learning how to use a router for the first time, to bettering my skills with a drill press, this project has really taught me a lot. One of the best things its helped refine for me personally is my ability to think critically and on my feet for myself, but has also refined my ability to humble and ask for help when I need it. Without these newly learned and refined skills, this project would not have gone as well as smoothly as it did.

However, there are a few skills that this particular project didn't require me to learn, but I would eventually like to learn. The first is how to use the wood lathe well, and be able to make and form complicated crafts. The second is how to weld, specifically stick welding. With my father being a welder the majority of my childhood, I have seen what a wonderful skill welding is and the creative potential that is opened up by being able to weld well. The third skill I wish I could have also learned is how to master working with a drill press. What I mean by that is I want to learn how to make bit speed adjustments and be able to do general maintenance on the press.

One thing I felt I excelled at with this project is my sanding skills, whether with a handheld strip or with a belt sander. This is probably the skill I have the most experience with out of all the skills I've learned. I've been refining my sanding skills ever since I was a little boy when I was too small to help my dad and pawpaw with the paw tools. A lot of people may laugh because they think sanding is easy, when in reality it's not. It takes practice to get a good rhythm, proper pressure, and general wood knowledge to understand which sheet of sandpaper to use. It really is an art, just like painting, because it is a finishing process and in my opinion is the most fun finishing process out of any of them.

One thing I could have done different for my project is use wood for the balance arm instead of PVC, and use bailing twine instead of paracord. There is no structural difference in all four, but the wood and bailing twine would possibly look more natural to a rabbit and not raise as many red flags in the wild.

The things I could have done better in this project is making sure I am consistent with the drill press to produce identical holes. The more identical the holes are, the easier putting the box together is, and for my project there were a few holes that didn't line up too well, so I had to take a hand drill and fix the problem by pre-drilling new holes or using the bit to widen the holes.

I enjoyed everything about this project , but the one thing I didn't like was screwing together all the pieces. The reason is because I was afraid that boards would split upon screwing them together. But other than that, I loved every aspect of making my project.

Thanks for sharing. Did I miss it? Were you successful in catching a rabbit?
<p>It will work, but only in certain situations. If the rabbit feels enclosed, he may not even enter the trap. Some time use 1/4&quot; or even 12&quot; welded screen wire is a better option to let the rabbit think it is in a thicket because he can see through the trap. But I do remember making such traps as a younger kid. Just be kind to the rabbit once you trap him. They are a lot more skittish then you would think. And release him once you are finished learning about rabbits. JMHO</p>
<p>That's a neat setup :)</p>

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