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I modeled it in SolidWorks and used the rapid prototype machine at school to make it. More info on the 3D printer can be found here

Full sized photos can be found at my flickr album

If you liked this please digg it

I uploaded the .sldprt and .stl files for the project in this forum post. For those of you who do not have SolidWorks, you can get the e-drawings file (wcc.exe) instead. Just download it and open it - no special programs needed.
That brief moment when you nerd out and say to your self out loud &quot;XD&quot;!!! <br>VERY NICE I FRIGGIN WANT ONE NAO BUT DOESNT HAS A 3D PRINTER WWWWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA <br> <br>
http://www.shapeways.com/ <br> <br>You can order 3D prints from here!
Did anyone else notice the print head has an Aperture on it?<br />
Yeah, and is there is GlaDOS in the background
does anyone know how expensive 3d printers are?
Very. My engineering department has two from here <a href="http://www.dimensionprinting.com/default.aspx" rel="nofollow">http://www.dimensionprinting.com/default.aspx</a>
where do you buy one of those awesome printers?
May I suggest building a <a rel="nofollow" href="http://reprap.org/bin/view/Main/WebHome">RepRap</a>?<br/>
the main page is extremely confusing, do you know if there is any forum or reprap for dummies page?
omg that was odd idk why but it was like watching an episode of look around you
<a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.zcorp.com/">here</a> and <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.dimensionprinting.com/default.aspx">here</a> are some good ones, but they are crazy expensive.<br/>
be able to go to my high school is sweet. we have a prototyping machine just like that one, a sand protoyper, and the largest frekin printers that ive ever seen like 4 to 5 feet wide. what class did u do this for?
&nbsp;my high school has a 3d printer and a 3d mill :D
I did it in my 'manufacturing process' class in college.<br />
so that printer thingy makes 3d objects? anyhow i favorited it <sup></sup><br/>
Never played Portal, and couldn't care less about the premiss of the companion cube, but this rocks. Very cool idea. Too bad 3D printers are so expensive, still... hmmm. You, sir, recieve the Rock Lee thumbs up for this. lol
scientists rigged a normal printer to print with bacteria and now they're trying to use 3d printing to print human hearts etc.
Thanks. You really should try Portal - best 2 hours of gaming I've had in a while and easily in my top 5 best games ever.
omg it is awesome! too bad not everyone can do such an amazing FUNCTIONAL Aperture Science Weighted Companion/Storage Cube xD
Zorink, I love the slide show. I actually work for Dimension 3D Printing and am amazed at what the printers can do. Right now I am printing a model of the Ra VII the Solar Car from Principia College that took 2nd place in the Solar Challenge. If you can design it, these printers can typically build it. Thanks!
I envy you. How did you get such a great job?
Right place, right time. It is a great place to work and I love the product.
Unbelievable!<br/><br/>One day modeling, next day a finished product. Keep it up.<br/><br/>Have a good one,<br/>Ivan<a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.prototypezone.com">Rapid Prototyping Info</a><br/>
That's just too cool! You should sell those on eBay. I want one! 5 stars.
awesome, my highschool has i think the same 3D printer, maybe a bit bigger, i love using that thing,and the pieces get reeeeeaally hot
Your high school has one!? I just finished my first year of college and wanted to use the 3D printer before the year was over so I made this.
Hello Zorink, My sister attends the ASU polytechnic campus, and I was wondering if you need special clearance to use the printer. For my sister's Architecture Lab's laser cutter you need fairly high-level clearance and a signed form from a professor. Does this apply to the 3D printer as well?
I didn't know we had a laser cutter, cool! No you don't need any clearance, just bring the SolidWorks file and print it off. The only problem is that it costs $10 per cubic inch for non-school related things. I got lucky though, my professor thought it was really cool so I only had to pay for the cost of material - $5 per cubic inch. Even with the deal it still cost $25 (completely worth it). The printer is in the engineering studio. Most of the big machine things are in the SIM building.
Thanks for the quick reply! I'm wondering as to what Engineering field you are in, as I am seriously considering heading into the Aerospace field in a couple of years. My primary college is ASU, as I really like it there. The part that amazes me the most is how all those people on the long-boards don't run you over as they speed around campus at almost 20 mph. Do the professors allow "outsiders" to use the equipment, or is it all so specialized, expensive, and awesome that one must be an engineering student to use it? I know that my Auto-Tech teacher mentioned that he may be getting one of those static-based prototyping machines. From what I gathered, it electrically charges plastic shavings to clump together in a prearranged pattern in any shape, form, or state (hollow versus solid). Are you familiar with this technology? Anyways, I hope to hear again from you soon, -Michael P.S. (Sorry I can't PM you back, however Instructables isn't accepting the numbers I input at the end of the message. I think it is some sort of glitch)
I think I'm going to major in mechanical and might minor in electrical. The cool thing about the program is you don't have to decide for the first two years. You get a general look at each field and specialize your junior and senior year. I just finished my first year there and we made pneumatic rockets (they didn't want fire during the construction), sumo fighting robots, and reconfigurable roller coaster kits. I have pics of the coaster kits on my Flickr, I need to add the other projects still. As far as "outsiders" using it, I don't think so. If you can make a model in SolidWorks they might let your sister use it since she goes there even if she's not in the engineering program. As far as the static prototyping machines, I've heard of them, but don't really know anything. I think we're getting something similar in the future. One of the professor's friends started a company that is going to make desktop RP machines and we get to test the first ones! We're supposed to get them in a year or two (they are not finished making them yet) but they are supposed to be about the size of a large microwave, have a print area of 5"x5"x5" and only cost $5000. The guy wanted to make a more affordable one for hobbyists that just goes next to your regular printer. Since we'll be beta testing them we're getting 10 for half price and discounts on the print material! I can't wait for them to be finished.
That's awesome! It would be really cool to have one of those machines just sitting on my desk ready to create anything I want it to. Right now I'm trying to save up for a micro-lathe, as it takes forever to get the lathe down in the Machining Lab to work. Apparently the problem with is that it's an old Austrian design, good in concept, but unfortunately the gears have gotten loose with age so every time i want it to run I have to open the gear box and reconfigure everything. It's reminiscent of having to reinstall your engine block every time you want to use your car. It's kind of sad that ASU doesn't let non-alumni use such fun toys as the laser-cutter and 3D printer, however I do understand their point - such toys are expensive. Are the qualifications to continue in Engineering rigorous? I know that in my sister's Architecture class, only 50 of the 850 or so applicants are permitted to continue. I never really fully comprehended what Mechanical Engineering entails. I mean, most engineering IS mechanical, so I find it slightly confusing. <RAMBLE> I'm trying to get into the field ASAP so I joined my school robotics club. We built a robot called Deviant Rotor was a rotor-type weapon (hence the name). It got 4th in state, yet it had the potential to get 1st. what really killed us was the low-grade aluminum we were forced to use due to the absence of money. On the bright side, it was one of coolest robots there, as when we cranked up the weapon motor to full RPM the robot began shaking like a helicopter on the launch pad and corners lifted up, freaking everyone out. We also managed to crack the quarter inch thick Lexan panels on the arena. I think that since we slightly over-clocked the motor it was outputting over 3500 RPM, combined with our weapon that was more than enough to demolish a 2x4 in one shot.</RAMBLE> Ahhh, good times. Yet again, I am amazed by your quick replies. It's people that you that make Instructables such a good place to be!
I wouldn't say they're rigorous, but it's tough to get in. The class sizes are really small (my biggest class was about 40 people) and they are trying to keep it that way. Being in a robot club will definitely help. If you really want to get in, schedule a tour with one of the professors. That way they know who you are and know you are interested (that's what I did). On engineering, mechanical is gears, levers, things with moving physical parts. Electrical is more circuits and control systems. The fields used to be pretty distinct, but are starting to blur. Robots are a good example of the two mixing. Also, Cars used to be pure mechanical, but now have a lot of electrical components too (most cars now have small computers in them).
True that. <RAMBLE>I wish it was still like the old days when a guy with a hammer, wrench, and screwdriver could re-calibrate his carburetor. Now they don't even have carburetors any more. In case you're wondering, in Auto-Tech we were donated 2 cars, one a super-old Mustang, and the other a 1998 Chevy Prism. The Mustang was up and running in 2 days, but the Chevy Prism is beyond us until our teacher goes and gets a diagnostic computer for around $2000. Just goes to show you, mechanical is a lot more consumer friendly. (Please note the above statement does not apply to computers, airplanes, ICBM's, nuclear warfare, etc.)</RAMBLE> It's good how ASU gives you 2 years to pick a specific field. Right now I'm torn between Aerospace and Mechanical. I might just major in Mechanical and minor in Aerospace, but Aerospace doesn't seem like a good field to minor in. Maybe electrical. Do you have any recommendations as to classes to take in High School? Thanks! -Recon506
They have a great aerospace program here because it's right next to Williams Field airport (the campus is used to be an air force base). We also have a good pilot training program - there is a full-fledged flight simulator and an altitude chamber somewhere. There's planes and helicopters flying around all the time. It's also fairly close to the apache helicopter factory. As far as high school, get as much math and science as you can. I'd also suggest one or two CAD classes if they're offered. The robotics club should be a plus too.
yeah our drafting and design class has one bigger than this (i think) we have about 35 computers, and i primarily use AutoCAD 2008, Inventor 2008, and occasionally Civil 2008. PSU is still running 2006 programs heheheh. do you have the 3D connexion spaceball? thats what we use instead of using the mouse. im halfway done making a full sized trebuchet and recently finished a solvable rubiks cube, enough bragging for today, i think i'll try a hit at making this, great instructable!!
What kind of crazy future world do you come from where high schools have so much cool stuff, and what is this spaceball you speak of?
haha, my <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.eastlycoming.net">highschool</a> has a rather extensive technical wing. and the space ball is a 3-D navigational mouse for viewing 3-D scenes <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.gamedev.net/features/reviews/productreview.asp?productid=509">heres a link</a><br/><br/>&lt;a href=&quot;http://s160.photobucket.com/albums/t193/jungaboo13/?action=view&amp;current=figure1.jpg&quot; target=&quot;_blank&quot;&gt;&lt;img src=&quot;http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t193/jungaboo13/figure1.jpg&quot; border=&quot;0&quot; alt=&quot;Photobucket&quot;&gt;&lt;/a&gt;<br/>
hmm, guess i didnt see the "add images" button
I want one!
That's some amazing equipment to play around with in high school! You guys have a laser cutter as well?
yeah, our automotive tech classes have an aluminum cutter, so we can design a part in the drafting class, and have the file print out in plastic, then take it over to the automotive tech class and print it out in aluminum (or some other kind of metal) its pretty sweet
You know, I was going to make an envyresponse to Zorink, but it's his _college_ that has a 3D printer. Since your highschool has one, you get my hate+envy instead. HATE!
haha, I'm sure you have something in your possession that i envy, most likely a drivers license...:(
You'll notice that this isn't actually a Weighted Companion Cube. It is not my friend, and it doesn't have hearts. But seriously, this is pretty sweet. Good job.
that doesn't REALLY matter does it now?
I don't think I said it REALLY mattered, but I'm sorry my fanboyishness has troubled you.
I was originally going to paint it, but I like how it looks already. I made it into a box so it has turned into more of a weighted storage cube.
To upload the files, it'd probably be better to either host them on another server or to start a forum topic and upload them there.
Thanks, the files are now at the linked forum topic.
I'm sorry, but this is clearly an Aperture Science Weighted Storage Cube. It can be used to depress the Aperture Science Supercolliding Superbuttons, but is not suitable for Companionship. Please proceed to the Aperture Science Instructables-related Incineration Chamber, where there will be cake.

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