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Step 4: Power

My power system depends on AA batteries.  Since I do not want to spend countless dollars on batteries, I got six rechargeable batteries and a recharger.  This is pretty simple. 

If you get a MintyBoost as I did, you need to make a simple modification to use it on your RaspberryPi.  The Pi requires more power than just 2xAA batteries alone can provide.  All I did was wire two 2xAA battery packs in parallel before connecting them to the MintyBoost.  I don't have an altoids gum case (yet), so I simply dropped the exposed battery pack and minty boost into an anti-static bag.  Connect a micro-USB cable to the MintyBoost.  Your portable Pi power system is now complete. 

I have not done any tests as to how long the battery pack will actually last, but I speculate that it is within the laptop/netbook battery life range.  Of course, you can use as much or as little power as you want.  It all depends on how much you're willing to carry around with you.  This setup is meant to be super-portable. 

Having 4 batteries is CRITICAL.  I can't stress this enough.  Two batteries will run your RaspberryPi, but it is not enough power to power the keyboard/trackpad and WiFi dongle. 
Are there anything else that could be used as a monitor, instead of video glasses? I ask only because they are a little expensive.
try taking a small lcd screen (2 inches or so) which can be bought for under $30 on amazon, and attach it under the lip of a baseball cap, covering one eye. you can then either cover the other eye with an eyepatch, or if you are good at focusing one eye at a time, you can just focus on the screen when you want to use the computer, and focus on other stuff when you are just walking around. however, the screen uses rca connectors, so you will need a converter of some sort to connect to the rasberrypi
<p>Can i please have a link, I cant find any.</p>
<p>Can i please have a link, I cant find any.</p>
<p>Can i please have a link, I cant find any.</p>
<p>What all can you use for a screen? Can I use something other than the specified video glasses?</p>
<p>if you dont mind not having a brand</p><p>These are around $50; http://m.ebay.com/itm/151712198885?nav=SEARCH</p>
<p>That link is dead, can you please find another?</p><p>As I cant find anything for that price</p>
Unfortunately those seem to have been the only ones under $60. The cheapest ones are found by searching eBay for &quot;video glasses&quot;. A generic pair can be found for $60-80.
<p>thanks</p>
<p>You can use anything that outputs composite or HDMI video. That is the beauty of the RaspberryPi. I chose to use video glasses for the purpose of making the entire setup wearable. </p>
<p><br>Its interesting<br><br>Thats useful...</p>
<p>Amazing tutorial, very well done. I am currently making one of my own, albeit with only one display. My question is this; what kind of draw is there in amps by the setup? I am having a problem with the power pack I am using curently.</p>
<p>Thats awesome</p>
<p>I would say &quot;amazing&quot;, but i can't because my jaw broke when it hit the floor. This is one of the coolest things i've ever seen.</p>
<p>Note to those who have asked me a question to which I have not replied: Work gets the best of me sometimes. While I try to stick around to answer questions I do not always get the chance. </p>
<p>Hi,</p><p>I was wondering if instead of the listed Raspberry Pi Model B I could use the Model A+?</p>
<p>Sure, that's probably an even better choice now that it is available since it uses less power. Your only challenge will be using one USB port. USB can only output so much power so if you want a keyboard and network connection it might be a challenge. </p>
<p>Excellent...!!</p>
<p>Appreciate the links that you gave and the pricing, thanks for that!</p>
<p>Outstanding...!!</p>
<p>Thats astonishing...</p>
<p><br><br>Very good...!!</p>
What kind of image quality do you get from this? Can you read this comment on it?
<p>he said his glasses are 852x480px each</p>
<p>could you provide amazon or ebay links for these?<br>I live in Israel, and it's pretty hard for me to find electrical supplies where I live that arent grossly overpriced</p><p>Thanks!</p>
<p>Thats astonishing...<br></p>
<p>Thats marvelous</p>
<p>Thats remarkable...<br></p>
<p>Pretty cool. I think the word you're looking for is &quot;portability&quot;.</p><p>I'm not really sure how your glasses work, but, depending on the tech, the LCDs may have semi-reflective back panels (to even out the back light distribution?) or just a sheet of something opaque. If you can get that off, you should be able to see through the lcds (they should be mostly transparent). If you can turn the backlight off and have software that sets the pixels for white (presumably the max transparency of the lcd) you might be able to have better visibility through them.</p><p>It would probably be good to have UV protection on the outside edge in such a design, as the amount of light that travels through the lcd might be small enough to cause your eyes to dilate (to let in more light) and thus expose you to more UV than usual (if the glasses don't block UV).</p>
<p>You might instead add the raspberry pi camera to the outside so you can walk around and take pictures of the way you are facing...</p>
<p>Translucent might be more truthful, but it would probably be better than not being able to see through the.</p>
<p>I am thinking about doing this for about a hundred bucks because I already have everything for the Pi I just need a keyboard/mouse combo that is bluetooth...</p>
<p>great</p>
<p>NICE</p>

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