Introduction: Rebuild Your Ryobi ONE+ Battery Pack

I've had my Ryobi ONE+ system for over five years now and the batteries are shot. Let's see what it takes to rebuild one.

Step 1: Tools Needed

Screwdriver
Wire cutter
Soldering iron
Solder

Step 2: Take It Apart

Remove six screws from the bottom. Pull the black and orange sections apart.

Step 3: Identify the Cells

Remove the cluster of batteries and identify the number and type of cells are contained in the pack. In this case, there are 15 Nickel Cadmium C cells.
From here we have some options. Since they're C cells, we can replace them with any popular battery chemistry.
We can use NiCad, NiMh or Lithium Ion.
NiCad or Nickel Cadmium are the least expensive and least powerful at $2.70 for each 2400 mAh cell. This gives us a material cost of $40.50 plus tax and shipping.
NiMh or Nickel Metal hydride is next up in cost and power. At $4.85 for each 5000 mAh cell. Replacement of the cells would be $72.75.
Finally, Lithium ion cells are $10.99 each for 3.6 volt 8500 mAh cells. Granted, you would only need 5 to get to the desired 18 volts, but then they're going to rattle around in the case.


Step 4: Make the Purchase!

With the cost of cells alone exceeding the cost of a replacement battery pack, I think it's time to pack this project up and go buy a battery pack.
Seriously, with brand new Ryobi NiCd packs available for as little as $30 and their new Lithium Ion pack for as little as $40, this is not a worthwhile project.
Don't forget to properly dispose of the old batteries.

Comments

author
lousiezhang (author)2017-07-26

A good instructables, thank you for the pose. A new Ryobi ONE+ 18-Volt Replacement Battery Pack is also not expensive.

author
joesradios (author)2017-02-23

I really appreciate this Instructables! After researching several different scenarios to replace my Ryobi P100 One + battery pack, I decided that it would be cheaper to purchase the same battery pack that I found on Amazon for $22.99 with free shipping with Amazon prime.

No I'm not a paid advertising for Amazon prime, I just know barking when I see it. I'm not sure this was a true Instructables but it sure did walk me through a procedure where I learned that there were probably about nine dead cells in this one cluster of 15. I double checked with a different meter and still came up with the same number of dead cells.

By the way, before I took it apart I had reversed polarities and used a 12 V car battery to reset the battery and break up the crystals. This work for about two years but finally it would not accept the charge and I realized that something more was wrong. So I'm grateful for this Instructable and will devote my time to other more worthy DIY projects. Thank you again and hi5.

author
W0JT (author)2016-11-21

There are several incorrect statements in this article. The cells in the NiCd pack are NOT C cells, they are sub-C cells. And even though the complete 18v packs are fully interchangeable (as long as you use the dual-chemistry charger), the individual cells are NOT interchangeable. Yes, you could replace all 15 NiCd cells with 15 NiMH cells. But you can't rebuild a NiCd pack into a Li-Ion pack. The battery management board of a Li-Ion pack has one (P105 or P108) or two (P104) extra electrical tabs that protrude through the top of the case and interact with the dual-chemistry charger. Without that, you would build an incendiary device instead of a battery pack.

author
JDM18 (author)2016-07-27

No "Rebuild" here - Clickbait & Spam

author
FredS78 (author)JDM182016-10-09

How is this "Clickbait & Spam" when there isn't any actual Spam?

author
bikenex (author)2016-09-17

cioty usa

author
JerryT14 (author)2016-09-08

What a waste of time. Shame on you sir!

What a trolley car....

author
DanY12 (author)2016-07-30

I respectfully disagree with those who are disappointed in the review. Step one could have said "go to Home Depot or ebay", but at least this shows disassembly, what they look like inside, then the per cell cost of replacement...which is more than the cost of buying brand new, OEM batteries of same or better capacity, without considering your time and effort, which is considerable when trying to solder/weld to batteries. Other, obsolete battery packs may be worth the time and effort to rebuild. However, due to massive availability and thus reasonable cost, there is zero benefit or incentive to rebuild the Ryobi one plus batteries.

author
BufordF (author)2016-03-29

highly misleading. What happened to the Harbor Freight batteries mentioned in the heading. Have rebuilt Black And Decker with them. Was hoping for similar instructions for the Ryobi. You disappoint.

author
ChrisH341 (author)2016-03-20

here an idea but i dont knownhow to do it... would it ve possible to use the adapter to make a corded drill instead? it eould be a neat way to have it ad a back uo option if it was cheap enough?

author
DaleA1 (author)2014-09-14

You can get 5 x 18650 LiIon batteries for about $1 each on ebay (UltraFire). Of course if you're going to rebuild with LiIon cells, you should put in some charge control circuitry, so that you don't explode it when you try to charge, or drain the batteries too low, but should give you MUCH more capacity. (Technically you can use protected cells, but that will add a bit more.). Charge control circuitry can be had for about $20.

author
par64guy (author)DaleA12015-10-10

I would use extreme caution with UltraFire. There are a lot of fakes out there depending on where you buy. One thing I learned as a designer of battery-powered devices is that physics and chemistry limits the capacity of an 18650 to around 3000mA-hr. If you see a battery labeled as higher capacity, then it is almost certainly fake. Take a look at this video to help the warning sink in a bit better: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTzEHsJVZhA

author
Dretra09 (author)2015-10-08

The original mah is around 1300. If you replace with nimh with 5000 mah then you are getting a lot more bang for your buck

author
Marsh (author)Dretra092015-10-08

You can actually buy those pre-made for $39. Way less than the cost of the cells alone and comes with a warranty.

author
SkeptikcC (author)2015-09-18

This is not good decision-making.You don't have to change all the individual cells, you only have to change the bad ones. You'll need a digital multimeter to test the voltage and if the voltage of some are much lower than specified, they are damaged. If you have a few "used-up" Ryobi packs, open them, test them all, then remove the bad ones. I had 4 not working and after swapping out bad and swapping in good, I was left with 3 good ones that work.

Keep in mind, also, that if your pack won't charge with the red light, you can sometimes overcome this by simply pulsing the battery while in the battery pack. Red light appears, not green when placing battery in charger. Pulse charger by pulling plug out of socket back and forth rapidly. Often, the pulses will break down the resistance causing the problem and the light will go to green. Once light goes green, let battery charge normally, and when finished, use normally. If red light appears next time, do same. This resistance may sometimes cause the fuse in the battery pack to blow. I've shorted out the fuse to get my battery packs to charge on green, but if you do this, warning: you do this at your own risk of the batteries overheating.

author
Marsh (author)SkeptikcC2015-09-19

My time is clearly worth way more than yours. At $12 for a replacement unit, it's not worth doing anything more than dropping this into the e-waste.

author
dbyrd26 (author)2014-04-18

You could always identify the bad cell and replace it. Cheaper that way.

author
Marsh (author)dbyrd262014-04-18

True, but at 5 years old, they're all likely to be bad.

author
jonkun227 (author)Marsh2014-05-20

False. Nearly every battery pack has one or two cells that are failing while the rest are in excellent condition. Testing is often as simple as checking each cell individually with a multimeter.

author
Marsh (author)jonkun2272015-09-18

Not even slightly true. Serviceable, possibly. Excellent? No way!

author
SkeptikcC (author)jonkun2272015-09-18

I agree that this is bad advice! You don't have to change all the individual cells, you only have to change the bad ones. You'll need a digital multimeter to test the voltage and if the voltage of some are much lower than specified, they are damaged. If you have a few "used-up" Ryobi packs, open them, test them all, then remove the bad ones. I had 4 not working and after swapping out bad and swapping in good, I was left with 3 good ones that work.

Keep in mind, also, that if your pack won't charge with the red light, you can sometimes overcome this by simply pulsing the battery while in the battery pack. Red light appears, not green when placing battery in charger. Pulse charger by pulling plug out of socket back and forth rapidly. Often, the pulses will break down the resistance causing the problem and the light will go to green. Once light goes green, let battery charge normally, and when finished, use normally. If red light appears next time, do same. This resistance may sometimes cause the fuse in the battery pack to blow. I've shorted out the fuse to get my battery packs to charge on green, but if you do this, warning: you do this at your own risk of the batteries overheating.

author
Marsh (author)jonkun2272014-05-20

Not likely. While a small number may be bad and the rest "acceptable," it is highly unlikely you'll find a five year old NiCd in "excellent" condition. There's a world of difference between acceptable and excellent.
Let's assume only three of the fifteen cells are bad. That would be $9 plus shipping, and you have to tear it apart and fix it. The cost of those three cells is over half way to a brand new battery pack, and it's only going to extend the life another year (at dramatically reduced performance).
If you're looking to save money, gutting an 18v pack from Harbor Freight and replacing them all is still the best deal at $12.

author
jonkun227 (author)Marsh2014-05-20

I understand the distinction, and I used the term deliberately. I've rebuilt numerous batteries of comparable age. I test the cells first with a multimeter and the impedance is often as accurate as the testing I later do with an actual capacity analyzer which reports the capacity down to the milli-amp hour after several charge-drain-charge cycles at controlled rates with appropriate rest periods between. And I've tested Harbor Freight cells. There's a reason those batteries are so cheap. Years-old cells of good original quality are far better than new but poorly made cells.

The most cost-effective solution is actually to pick up some "bad" Ryobi battery packs on ebay or second-hand stores and combine cells from multiple packs to make a good one.

author
RogerJ6 (author)2015-08-31

Your smart, agree 100%, thanks for going through this.

author
pws33 (author)2015-08-05

Very dry...but I laughed. (: ) I've spent as much on batteries for my Ryobi blower as I did on the original purchase. I'm going 2-stroke petrol!

author
Ryan MacKenzie (author)2015-06-14

Might not be worth while if you live in the states, but living in Sweden this is a bargain project.

author
aebe (author)2015-01-27

From Google , @ 9:49 , today


  1. Rebuild Your Ryobi ONE+ Battery Pack - Instructables

    www.instructables.com/.../Rebuild-Your-Ryobi-ONE-Batter...
    Instructables
    I've had my Ryobi ONE+ system for over five years now and the batteries are shot. ... I'd get the 18v battery pack from harbor freight ($13) open it up, move cells ...
author
aebe (author)2015-01-27

Thank you ! I was just starting a search for rebuilding info , and your 'ibl is the first in line on google . :)

author
bryansatv (author)2014-11-23

Ive learned that those battery packs sit on the shelf at crooked depot for years. When I bought my drill kit some 10 years ago the batteries lasted 7 of those years under hard use. I bought a 2 pack at depot as a replacement and dident even get a year out of them. One battery even shorted out and fried my charger. And those 18650 batteries on feebay you got to watch too half of those are garbage out of the box. I use them in the cree flashlights. I had one of those short out and burn the driver out of the light. 100 buck flashlight needs a new $35.00 driver now. I own a bike shop and even buying batteries for them is like throwing money at the wall and see if it sticks.

author
tylerwhitworth (author)2014-04-22

interesting perspective. I'd get the 18v battery pack from harbor freight ($13) open it up, move cells from harbor freight battery pack to ryobi and resolder if necessary. The way I see it is yeah you can go buy a new one for 30 or 40 bucks and thats a good price, but its still 17-25 dollars more. http://m.harborfreight.com/18-volt-nicd-replacement-battery-68413.html

author
Marsh (author)tylerwhitworth2014-04-22

At $12.99, that would be the best deal so far.

author
tylerwhitworth (author)Marsh2014-04-22

That's what I thought. In fact I bought a couple of these battery packs and a drill there about a year ago and spent about 30 dollars or so, I meant to do the battery pack on my ryobi drill because I think it's a better drill it has the larger chuck anyways. But I haven't done it yet. I'll try and do it soon and write up an instructable.

author
abikerider (author)2014-04-21

I also came to the same conclusion when one of my Dewalt batteries died. I can buy a new battery pack on ebay for less than the cost of the 15 cells.

author
Marsh (author)abikerider2014-04-21

I can get them at the Home Depot cheaper than the cells alone.

author
ajensen27 (author)2014-04-18

why not rebuild the pack with better batteries so it will hold charge longer

author
Marsh (author)ajensen272014-04-19

Did you not read the ible? The reason why not is because the cells to do that alone are far more expensive than just buying a new pack. That's pretty clearly detailed in step three.

author
kc8hps (author)2014-04-18

Thanks Marsh I was about to try this I will look closer before I move forward. Peace. Bryan

author
pfred2 (author)2014-04-18

I would have tried zapping it. I mean what have you got to lose?

author
russ_hensel (author)2014-04-18

Here is a 20 dollar fix: https://www.instructables.com/id/Drill-Resurrection-with-New-Batteries-for-Cheap/ or add a cord: https://www.instructables.com/id/Cordless-Drill-Repair-Add-a-Cord/ or other battery fixes: https://www.instructables.com/id/Cordless-Drill-Battery-Maintenance/ And of course you have a point, and at some point get a whole new drill.

author
carlos66ba (author)2014-04-18

Good instructable, but total cost for the fix is similar to getting a new battery. 2 batteries of this type cost $60 (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ryobi-18-Volt-One-Plus-Ni-Cd-Batteries-2-Pack-P101/100086262)

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Bio: I'm an environmentally conscious experimenter who loves to bring people together, build things, and when possible...blow things up! See us on YouTube too ...
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