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We are restoring a cabin in the Pacific Northwest with a reclaimed/industrial aesthetic and needed a coat hanger to go with our Reclaimed Driftwood Bench and we wanted to continue with the vintage look so we decided to build a Reclaimed Driftwood Coat Hanger. We also have a fascination with all things nautical so we went with galvanized boat cleats for hangers. This will give us a tough and outdoor worthy coat hanger suitable for wet rain coats and bathing suits.

Step 1: Materials

Obviously a nice piece of driftwood is the key component, but we will get into that in the next step.

An appropriate number of boat cleats. We like the galvanized metal but other materials such as plastic and stainless steel are available depending on taste.

Two differnent lenghths of screws depending on the depth of your driftwood (we will get into this more in a later step.)

Step 2: Tools

The only tools we used were a tape measure, a level and a drill with appropriate bits.

You may need a saw and some sand paper depending on your driftwood.

Step 3: Sourcing Appropriate Driftwood

Obviously finding appropriate driftwood is a challenge, but maybe not as much of a challenge as you might think if you live near a beach. Naturally formed driftwood actually plays many important role in the Eco System by protecting beaches from erosion and providing habitat for a variety of species so please don't just start removing anything. However parts of docks and piers are also constantly finding their way into oceans and beaches. These often times have harsh chemicals or toxic paints that should be removed if possible. Look for artificial cuts, painted areas and the tell tale surface cuts of pressure treated wood. If you find one that is close to the size you need you can always cut it down. If its too large to carry I've been known to mark its location and kayak back during high tide and drag lumber back via ropes. Be aware of private property and beach access rights in your area. With any luck you will find a piece that has been dashed around by the waves for awhile and has the appropriate thickness, character, smoothness and length. There are also recycled house parts stores and even reclaimed lumber stores where you may be able to find what you want. This basic plan would work with any sturdy piece of wood so think creatively.

Step 4: Placement and Installation

Here is where your two different lengths of screws come in handy. We chose one depth that was long enough to go into our driftwood but not go through it and a second depth that was long enough to go through the driftwood and securely into our wall. We then were able to line up our cleats along our driftwood where the longer screws could also align with the 2x4 supports in the walls giving us a strong bond to the supporting wall.

Step 5: Enjoy!

This is a simple sturdy, inexpensive coat rack with a classic nautical look that will last for years. If you like building with recycled materials please subscribe as we have many upcoming projects and we will be posting more as we have time.

<p>Hooks or other pointy, protruding objects should be mounted above your own top-of-head height. In that way, you have an advantage should you get into a tussle with an intruder who is taller than you. You, unlike your tall intruder, can shove your adversary into your hooks and impale him in the eye! (But considering cleats point upward, his nostril may be the best you can hope for.)</p>
<p>that is probably the most interesting comment we have ever gotten on Instructables!</p>

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Bio: We are designer/builders making cool stuff and cozy mod tiny cabins from recycled materials. We have a bunch of adventures coming up so please ... More »
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