Instructables

Recycled Glass Pendant with waterslide decal art

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Picture of Recycled Glass Pendant with waterslide decal art
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Turn ordinary window glass into a beautiful, eco-friendly amazing art glass pendant. This tutorial is aimed at Instructables members who have basic glass fusing knowlege, access to a glass kiln, and basic glass tools.

You will need the following materials and tools:
-window glass, or other flat broken glass
-a glass cutter
-a sharpie pen
-your own artwork
-a Hewlett Packard Laserjet 1020 printer with genuine HP ink (check Beldecal.com or Delphiglass.com for suitable printers and inks. HP Laserjet ink has a high level of Iron Oxide in the ink, which will not burn out at glass fusing temperatures and therefore leaves you with a nice sepia image)
-a glass kiln
-Beldecal Laser waterslide transfer paper
-distilled water
-kiln shelf paper
-a kiln shelf
-solid copper (or silver, or bronze) wire (about 20 guage)
-wire cutter
-round nose pliers (or something to bend your wire on)
-Glassline lining and shading material for glass
-scissors

 
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Step 1: Preparing the glass pendant shape

Picture of Preparing the glass pendant shape

Step 1Select your window glass. These happen to be from an old home nearby that was renovating to more energy efficient windows. It is a good idea to give the glass a quick basic cleaning before you start cutting so your cutting wheel doesn't get tripped up on dirt. Goo Gone will take care of any yucky black tar that remains on the glass before you start cutting if you happen to have this kind of window.

Step 2: Design your pendant shape.

In this design method, the drawing that you create to decorate your pendant should be in black and white, drawn with either a felt tip pen, or you can use your photo editing program to create a black and white image. Photographic details will turn out well if the image is converted to a high contrast black and white image (grey scale won't work as well). Scan your artwork into your computer. Print your pendant onto plain paper. * Remember that if you are using text in your image, you may want to reverse your image using your photo editing program before printing (a friendly reminder from "Wombatmorrison").  Cut out your pendant shape from the sheet of paper to create your pendant template.

Using your glass cutter, cut out a section of glass from your window that is large enough to cut out two layers of identical sized pendant templates.
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Step 3: Trace your paper pendant template  with a permanent ink pen onto the piece of window glass, TWICE.
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Step 4: Use your glass cutter to score, then break the glass pendant shapes from your piece of glass.

Step 5: If necessary, use a glass grinder, or glass/concrete wet/dry sandpaper blocks to smooth and shape the edges until your two pieces of glass are the same size and shape.
 
Step 6: 
Clean your window glass using plain liquid dish soap and warm water, or basic glass cleaner (don't use scented, lotion added products). Dry your pendant glass shapes with a clean dish towel. Once it has been cleaned, try not to get fingerprints on it :) 

LatitiaR2 days ago

the fire schedule you have in step 16 - would that be for bulls eye or for window glass?

bgartman (author)  LatitiaR2 days ago
I fired them both on the same kiln shelf together using the schedule listed in the instructable. Generally window glass melts at a higher temperature than Bullseye 90 coe glass, but 1530 was sufficiently high to melt both glasses and round the edges slightly on the window glass. Kiln temperatures vary from kiln to kiln, and the window glass will vary in melting temperatures as well, so you may have to experiment a little.

Good luck! I would love to see how your pieces turn out!
scoochmaroo3 years ago
I would love to see a tutorial on glass fusing as well!
bgartman (author) 3 years ago
I added a note with a credit to you on step 2, and a reminder on step 7 to check the text.
thanks!
bgartman (author) 3 years ago
Hi
I absolutely love your Instructables name! Yes, the decals work so much better than I imagined, and allow you to create both images and text with much more detail than I thought possible. I didn't mention in the instructable that you should reverse the image for text, but probably should add it in to one of the steps.

My Dad always used to say the "round tuit" phrase too!
thanks so much for your comments
Brenda
I've been meaning to write an instructable about DIY iron-oxide/toner glass and ceramic decals, just haven't gotten around to it. I'm glad you shared the technique as I think it is very useful. Have you tried using text? You just need to reverse the image before you print the decal. I make lots of custom name and saying pendants with DIY decals. (say... next time I should make one with circular text saying, 'round to it' on it! MI remember that my grandpa had 'a round tuit' made from wood.)