Introduction: Recycled Toolbox Wood Stove for Under $20

This easy and fast upcycle project is perfect for the camper, survivalist or prepper. It cost under $20 and will keep you warm while camping or even can be used in a fish hut. It burns incredibly efficiently.

Step 1: What You Will Need for This Project

Gather the following materials and tools to make your stove.

Materials

1 X Old metal toolbox

2-3 lengths of round ducting

1 x scrap angle iron

1 x electrical junction cover

4 x bolts

4 x wing nuts that fit the bolts you have

13 x sheet metal screws

2 x steel hinges

1 x hook and eye set


Tools

Grinder with zip cutting and grinding wheels

Drill with various drill bits

pencil

tape measure or ruler

screw driver

Step 2: Mark and Cut Door Openng

1. Mark your door opening, roughly leaving 1" from the sides of the toolbox.

2. Using cutting wheel cut out your opening.

3. Grind down any remaining burs so you don't get cut.

Step 3: Install Door Hinges and Door

1. Place hinges on tool box and mark where yo want them placed

2. Drill holes in tool box and door.

3. Screw hinges to toolbox and door

Step 4: Mark Hole and Cut Opening for the Smoke Stack

1. Place piece of ducting on lid of tool box at the opposite end of the tool box and trace outline.

2. Mark a square so it fits inside your drawn circle.

3. Using grinder with cutting wheel, cut smoke stack hole.

Step 5: Mark and Cut Ducting

1. Mark ducting so it will fir inside the toolbox

2. Cut ducting with grinder with cutting disk

3. Keep the drop off the ducting you just cut

4. Make some cuts around one end of the drop about 1" apart

5. Make 90 degree bend of the pieces you just cut as shown in final picture.

6. Drill 3 - 4 holes for sheet metal screws evenly spaced to fasten drop piece to lid of toolbox over the smoke stack hole.

Step 6: Grind Paint Off Outside of Toolbox

Grind any paint off outside of toolbox as paint being burnt off will cause toxic fumes and can be hazardous to your health.

Step 7: Making the Legs

1. Take your angle iron piece and cut into 4 equal lengths.

2. Drill holes in top of angle iron and into the toolbox as shown.

3. Fasten legs with bolts and accompanying wing nuts.

* The wing nuts will allow you to fold the legs up out of the way for easier carrying and storage.

Step 8: Making Front Vent Plate and Additional Venting

1. Place your electrical box cover in the middle of the door and drill and screw into place.

2. Drill several holes through cover and through the door in the bottom half of the plate as shown.

* this will allow you to control the amount of air you wish your fire to have.

3. Drill additional vent holes around the base of the toolbox.

4. Drill and install your hook and eye so you can fasten door shut when desired.

Step 9: Burn Baby Burn

Time to stoke up that fire and let her burn.

You will need to do this out in the open in order to burn off any left over paint or galvanizing that might be on your ducting.

As you can see when the galvanizing burns off it is like a white powder. Once you give it a good burn you can lightly sand the pipe and tool box and paint it with high heat resistant paint if you wish.

Also if your tool box comes with a plastic handle you might want to remove it and replace it with a fabricated steel rod handle.

Fortunately my plastic handle is somewhat heat resistant and has a metal centre.

Enjoy your stove.

Comments

author
CLSflyer (author)2016-02-21

This is great and portability is fantastic, nice hunting stove I imagine. One concern is the durability, I would think the base would weaken due to the concentration of heat from the coals. What has your experience been so far? Perhaps a slight elevation from the base with mesh grid insert?

author
SurvivalCentral (author)CLSflyer2016-02-21

Hi CLSflyer: Thanks for the positive comments on the stove. I have not had any issues with the stove this far. Now that being said have only had about 30 fires in it thus far and seems to be holding. I will have to see how it does over time. I think I can get at least two seasons out of it. Thanks again. "Be Prepared, Stay Safe and Survive!"

author
canorth (author)2016-06-05

Re: idea of cement in stove - not good!!! I've seen it blow up!

author
chuckstake (author)2016-01-11

like it will + a grate to the bottom to let air under the wood

author

I think I would add a small layer of refractory cement to hold and even out the heat, but this is a great idea, I am going to be looking for a beat up one at estate and yard sales to do this project for the small shop I am building to do woodworking in.

author
seamster (author)2016-01-07

This is a really cool idea. Nice work!

author
SurvivalCentral (author)seamster2016-01-07

Thank you seamster for the nic comment and support :)

About This Instructable

23,465views

171favorites

License:

Bio: Robert started prepping 15 years ago in anticipation of the perceived Y2K crisis. Starting out small with just enough resources to get him and his ... More »
More by SurvivalCentral:Recycled Toolbox Wood Stove For Under $20Mini Hobo Stove and Cup Free Recycled SurvivalLight Weight Portable Archery Target For Under $25
Add instructable to: