Step 4: Rise & Knockback

Rising the dough
         Place the kneaded dough into an oiled bowl and cover with cling-film. A teaspoon of oil will prevent the
          dough from sticking and make it easier to turn out. Be prepared to wait patiently for your dough to rise.
          Sour dough can be temperamental, but will always grow well (see the photo below).

          Many factors will affect the rate at which it rises. So don't panic if it takes up to 6 hours to double in size.
          Rising time can be affected by the air temperature, activity of the Ferment or activity of the Starter.
Knockback the dough
         Once doubled in size the dough should be turned out on to a clean surface and knocked back.
          Knocking back removes the largest air bubbles and returns the dough to a manageable consistency.
          Fold the edges inwards and push down on the dough
For a way the professional bakers make a sourdough starter, see my post: <br><br>http://dangermencooking.blogspot.com/2004/10/i-promised-to-write-about-fermented.html
Many thanks for adding link. Very handy because I've not yet written instructions for making my Sour Dough Ferment. <br><br>Just to make things clear, where Mark_in_Hollywood's link refers to a &quot;Starter&quot;, my Instructable calls it a &quot;Ferment&quot;. I use &quot;starter&quot; to refer to a different part of the process. My recipe is not a San Francisco Sour Dough, more of an old fashioned European fermented bread.

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