loading

Step 2: Prep

Before you start any work you need to make sure you don't get electrocuted. If the wall you are removing doesn't have any outlets or wiring (Isolated or stub wall with no outlets or switches) then you can skip this paragraph. If, once started you find wiring come back to this paragraph and follow it. Eventually you are going to shut off the power to the wall at the breaker but before you do it is a good idea to label all the switches. Once everything is labeled then shut off the breakers in the work area. Make sure to test all switches and outlets so you don't get any surprises. With the power off remove the wall plates and then remove the switches and outlets from their boxes, or remove the entire box if it is attached to the wall and not a stud.

Take anything hanging or attached to the wall off. Remove screws, nails, etc. Pull everything sitting next to the wall, away.
Use a pry bar to remove the baseboards and trim. You don't care about damaging the wall but, if you plan on reusing any of the trim, use caution.

With the wall now bare, lay out drop cloths around the perimeter of the wall and cover everything you can in any adjoining rooms, drywall dust is the worst.

Before moving on have a little fun. Grab a permanent marker and go to town. Hit it with your hammer a couple of times (watch for studs). OK enough fun, back to work.
Great share may I suggest that if you decide to remove any wall to make sure it is not a load bearing wall and sticking a box fan facing outside in a window near the tear out will cut back on a lot of sheet rock dust
Thanks for sharing this, I have been wanting to do this for a while now. I just haven't known how to do any <a href="http://tuhavi.com/services" rel="nofollow">remodeling in Tucson</a> on our home because it's pretty old and I don't want to ruin anything. I think my wife would love it if I did this.
Thanks for sharing this, I have been wanting to do this for a while now. I just haven't known how to do any <a href="http://tuhavi.com/services" rel="nofollow">remodeling in Tucson</a> on our home because it's pretty old and I don't want to ruin anything. I think my wife would love it if I did this.
Now demolition is something I've done a lot of. Heck my business agent has called me his expert. His words, not mine. When he did he was on the phone with a contractor and I looked behind me, no one was there. So when he said he was with his demolition expert he must have meant me.<br> <br> Anyhow being the God of thunder and biblical destruction like I am I'd like to throw my 2 cents in about this article. All opinions I express on this topic are professional.<br> <br> The first thing I'd like to address is your list of tools. You don't need all of those tools. This is the only tool you need:<br> <br> <a href="http://www.photo-dictionary.com/photofiles/list/7312/9791crowbar.jpg" rel="nofollow">http://www.photo-dictionary.com/photofiles/list/7312/9791crowbar.jpg</a><br> <br> It is really called a shoe bar. I can explain what shoes are but it isn't important here. No, not what you wear on your feet.<br> <br> That one bar does it all. Rip the sheet rock off, take out the studs, pry up the sole (what you called a footing your footing is under your foundation) and top plates, heck I could even use it to remove all of the electrical. Not a problem. You wouldn't be reusing any of it, but it'd be gone.<br> <br> One thing you didn't include in your list that I do think is vitally important is debris containers. Yeah sure when we're torquing a place we just make huge piles of rip, but at some point you have to container everything up and haul it away. A little Mickey Mouse job like yours you're probably better off hoppering everything as you go.<br> <br> What'd you do carry it out a piece at a time? A pro would have used a garbage pail, if we didn't use carts, or wheel barrows, or some other hauling contrivance.<br> <br> I'm not going to address the wisdom of floor covering other than to say that flexible coverings like what you used is probably more trouble than it is worth. You didn't even tape it down. Maybe if you had it'd have worked better. Been there done that Masonite hardboard is the pro way to go, if we do anything at all. We'd still tape it down if we wanted it to be effective. Drop cloths are for painting, not debris protection.<br> <br> I'm going to wrap it up critiquing the form I'm seeing in the action photographs you've included in this article. What I'm seeing in Step 6 is all wrong. Why are you cutting the top of that door jamb? If you smack the bottom out the top will just about fall right out. Why are you prying in the middle of the sole plate in the picture under it? Start at the end, then work your way down the piece. Come on, use your head!<br> <br> Demolition isn't brain surgery, but a little common sense goes a long way.
Now demolition is something I've done a lot of. Heck my business agent has called me his expert. His words, not mine. When he did he was on the phone with a contractor and I looked behind me, no one was there. So when he said he was with his demolition expert he must have meant me.<br> <br> Anyhow being the God of thunder and biblical destruction like I am I'd like to throw my 2 cents in about this article. All opinions I express on this topic are professional.<br> <br> The first thing I'd like to address is your list of tools. You don't need all of those tools. This is the only tool you need:<br> <br> <a href="http://www.photo-dictionary.com/photofiles/list/7312/9791crowbar.jpg" rel="nofollow">http://www.photo-dictionary.com/photofiles/list/7312/9791crowbar.jpg</a><br> <br> It is really called a shoe bar. I can explain what shoes are but it isn't important here. No, not what you wear on your feet.<br> <br> That one bar does it all. Rip the sheet rock off, take out the studs, pry up the sole (what you called a footing your footing is under your foundation) and top plates, heck I could even use it to remove all of the electrical. Not a problem. You wouldn't be reusing any of it, but it'd be gone.<br> <br> One thing you didn't include in your list that I do think is vitally important is debris containers. Yeah sure when we're torquing a place we just make huge piles of rip, but at some point you have to container everything up and haul it away. A little Mickey Mouse job like yours you're probably better off hoppering everything as you go.<br> <br> What'd you do carry it out a piece at a time? A pro would have used a garbage pail, if we didn't use carts, or wheel barrows, or some other hauling contrivance.<br> <br> I'm not going to address the wisdom of floor covering other than to say that flexible coverings like what you used is probably more trouble than it is worth. You didn't even tape it down. Maybe if you had it'd have worked better. Been there done that Masonite hardboard is the pro way to go, if we do anything at all. We'd still tape it down if we wanted it to be effective. Drop cloths are for painting, not debris protection.<br> <br> I'm going to wrap it up critiquing the form I'm seeing in the action photographs you've included in this article. What I'm seeing in Step 6 is all wrong. Why are you cutting the top of that door jamb? If you smack the bottom out the top will just about fall right out. Why are you prying in the middle of the sole plate in the picture under it? Start at the end, then work your way down the piece. Come on, use your head!<br> <br> Demolition isn't brain surgery, but a little common sense goes a long way.

About This Instructable

11,016 views

93 favorites

License:

Bio: Why buy when you can DIY? Educated a Mechanical Engineer and trained as a classical cellist I consider myself a bit of a jack-of-all-trades, dabbling ... More »
More by bwrussell: 3-Ingrediant Taco Meat Battery Monitor - LinkIt One Code Bite 1 Quality of Life Meter Mk.2 - Smarter and Connected
Add instructable to: