Step 6:

Then we put the hole assembly into the wall, since the walls are hollow we have enough room to put it all in there without bending anything.
After closing it all up there is nothing to be seen, but if this cable breaks we can connect a new Hdmi cable within 10 minutes.  

And there you go, running a signal through a 5 meter long cable with a self-soldered connector, then through a Hdmi to Hdmi connector and then another 3 meters to the Imac with converter.
I tested it with a 1080P trailer and there was no scrambeld or strange picture to be seen, proves that Hdmi is a good and solid protocol.

Way to go Hdmi...

Bytheway a nice tip that I've got from from c0lin was to get one of these:

And I have seen comments about using glue as a strain relief, I have something to say about it: DONT DO IT!
It didnt work with any glue I used (including hot glue) and I ended up doing al this a second time.
The cable itself and the connectors are so smooth that any glue you would use has trouble sticking on to it.
That is why I left it out and used the aluminium and Tyraps approach.

For more tips (untested) look at the comments below (first page)
<p>Hi I'm looking for someone in the Maidstone, Kent area who can do this for me, any suggestions please.</p>
<p>Sorry, I am not even living the same country... :( Think there are some companies who do that though)</p>
<p>Just want to say a big thank you for these instructions! I signed up to instructables to share my experience after following your instructions. My in wall HDMI cable was damaged at the end. Your instructions were great and I followed everything exactly. In the end, I got a working hdmi cable again! Didn't like the unappealing technique of joining two cut ends of different hdmi cables together, especially when I couldn't find the exact same cable. I did purchase the hdmi connector from Conrad: alternatives are very hard to find, but they do charge a fortune to send outside UK/Europe. </p><p>I found the helping hands/rig vital to keep things still while soldering. I used 60/40 solder and a fine tip soldering iron - around 30w was sufficient. The desolder wire was very useful. </p><p>Your tips about applying some solder on the contacts was good, and also tinned some the tips. I used the solder with one hand and the other hand, I used a pair of tweezers to hold the wire in place. Tweezers were very helpful. I would directly apply the solder tip to the wire and it would solder on nice and neat. It was getting tight with some of the wires to reach the contacts, sometimes I had to slightly pull, but also thread the wires around others to minimise the distance - tweezers were very helpful. I guess prevention is the key, and keeping all wires the same length, and stripping them consistently is vital.</p><p>To identify which color wires goes to which end, I used the cut end of the broken hdmi connector, and stripped the end of the broken wires. I then used the multimeter to confirm which wire went to which contact (often the wires are hard to distinguish).</p><p>I connected all the data shield wires and even grounded the outer foil cover to the hdmi connector ( just copied the broken end hdmi connector )</p><p>I used the glue gun to insulate all the wires, very useful as I didn't strip the wires very evenly, and risk having the wires contact. Very good tip.</p><p>I will use the female-female hdmi connector and extra hdmi connector to prevent fiddling around with the new head connector I added.</p><p>Many thanks again for the clear instructions</p>
Hi Mboy1,<br><br>Thank you so much for your comment on this. <br>I am happy you we're able to fix your HDMI cable using these instructions, that is the biggest reason I put them up here.<br>Also thank you for your detailed email here, I usually don't get so much feedback on this. <br>Sorry for responding so late but I really do appreciate your comment.<br><br>Happy TV watching, with regards, Ewout...
<p>Hi, just wanted to say thank you for the simple and yet illustrated instructions.</p>
<p>Typo! </p><p>But ones the cable is cut</p><p>But once the cable is cut</p>
really helpful instructions! I'm going to try it my self next week. There's just one part I don't get.. When you measure the resistance &quot;to know which Connection is going where&quot;, where do you place the other end of the multimeter? You place one end with the small test wire connected to the working end of the cable, but what about the other end? How do you close the circuit? Feels like I'm missing something here...
Thanks for the instructions. The hardest part seems to be obtaining a connector. Any suggestions?
<p>I sometime work with the Wire to wire soldering, so if there is somewhere another damaged cable.. cut it into two pieces and there you go!</p>
I wrote too soon. Conrad.com does not ship to the US or Canada.
Thank you. That was easy. I sifted through <em>thousands</em> of sites before I asked. They're not so easy to find in the US.
you can get them every where on the internet, I just order them from conrad.com becuase I know it s a good company in all.. But I guess any website who has them on sale will do...
Some minor updates to the instructable and my english thanks for the comments...
This would be helpful if this was an especially long cable, however, if you find the correct shop you can find a good 6ft HDMI cable for about 1$ per foot. Since people shop around for TVs but not the accessories, I suspect the big stores make more money selling an HDMI cables than the 40&quot; flat screen. I buy my cables from the local &quot;geek&quot; shop. You know the kind of places that sells computer parts that require a screw driver to install.<br><br>Also watch that your solder is for electronics as the plumbing grade stuff leaves corrosive residue that is difficult to wash off. This residue will destroy the fine wires in a few years with any humidity. The residue is also slightly conductive and can hurt battery life in battery powered devices.<br><br>The hot glue tip from Pignanelli can be extended to also make strain reliefs. Hot glue is also nice because you can still solder inside of the glue if you have made a mistake.
I would recommend regular 63/37 solder. If the 'Tin' you call out is for lead-free solder is problematic in a hobby environment.. It needs higher temperatures and can easily lead to bad solder joints. Also, a fine tip soldering iron is a must.<br>Make sure to connect the shield wires! HDMI uses very high frequencies to transmit the video. Improper shield may cause trouble down the road or cause interference with other electronics. Remember: &quot;Hope is neither a plan nor a course of action&quot;.<br><br>The pinout is at: http://pinouts.ru/Video/hdmi_pinout.shtml
You still need to open up that panel to replace the second cable if anything goes wrong. Not done correctly in the first place and not done correctly the second time.<br><br>Get one of these: http://www.infinitecables.com/pop/wpk-hd1-d.htm
That is a great find. It could easily be adapted to fit the Euro style outlet. The next time someone stepped on the cable end you just unplug from the wall and pop on a new cable!
I agree wholeheartedly! The added cost of a wall plate is significantly less than replacing cables or soldering new ends, especially in high traffic areas.
Your maybe right for a other situation but there is no way that plate would fit next to the power sockets, the dimensions are all wrong. It was probably made for the US not europa. And you still need to buy a Hdmi cable and solder a connector, since everthing was already in place I think this was the best option...
No certainly a good fix for the situation, and a good writeup. I just hate soldering these types of connectors!
@&quot;The other end shoud still be connected to ground so that doesnt really matter. (I hope)&quot;<br><br>...a philosophy that hopefully our highway bridge designers do NOT use. :D<br><br>(Seriously,) when I do these types of connectors, if I have to recycle or repair one not made for that, hot glue (sticks) is a good solution to insulate and protect the soldering and wires. Not always the most attractive, but usually effective and durable.
But I do like the Idea....

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