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This repair is for the turbo water hose off my 2000 VW Passat and would not be recommended for hoses conveying really high pressures. 

Step 1: Bad Hose

Once the hose failed, it emptied the entire contents of the cooling system in a matter of seconds, and there was no getting home. I quickly found this was a dealer/internet-order only part and the dealer was asking over $120.  I couldn’t justify paying that much for a hose!

Step 2: The Cut

Using a side grinder, I cut the crimped ends off. A dermal, dye grinder, or even hacksaw will work for this. In the photo you can see what you end up with-I was surprised to find what was left was so easy to work with.

Step 3: No Leaking!

I cleaned the ends and applied Black Silicone to ensure it wouldn’t leak.  I also used a high quality, double-walled hose that won’t flatten out when bent and two hose clamps on each end. In this application the hose is so hard to get to its not a job I want to do twice!

Step 4: The Result

Over all, the hose and (in my opinion) the construction are better than stock.  The whole repair cost around $5.00 and about an hour of work, saving me over $115 and two days to have it ordered!
very good, same thing happened me to day, was going to call v.w in the morning,not now. thanks
the leak was where exactly?
The black hose bit that was replaced with a red hose, it's a water line that goes from the block to the turbo on a 00 VW passat.
great instructable :)
Fantastic! Kudos mate, this is the DIY spirit. Looks perfect to me.<br><br>K.

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