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Picture of Repairing Fishing Rods
These are just a sample of the rods I have customized or repaired; I can make a rod from blank shafts in 30 minutes and do a repair like the one I am going to show you in fifteen minutes. Many of the rods I get are from the garbage others are given to me and some I buy or build with parts I buy or salvage.
 
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Step 1: Rod From The Garbage

Picture of Rod From The Garbage
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I was out for a walk when I spotted this fishing rod in the garbage the but end was broken just in front of the guide behind the ferrule and it was covered in a thick layer of dust. The price tag saying $47.95 was still on the rod telling me they broke the rod just after buying it and left it in storage for some time before throwing it out.

Step 2: The Reel

Picture of The Reel
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The first thing I did for this repair was to take the reel off the rod, clean and test it. The reel looked and worked like new, this rod was worth taking out of the garbage just for the reel.

Step 3: The Break

Picture of The Break
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The but is the strongest part of the rod and breaks like this one happen for two reasons; cold and stressed or just over stressed, this can happen when the drag on the reel is set too heavy, the line is too heavy, and you pull to hard, or try to lift a big fish. It can happen when the drag is set right the line is the right poundage and the rod is very cold. This reel is rated for 6-8-10 pounds and the rod is rated for 8-10-12 pounds. I tested the old line and estimated it was 15 pound test.

Step 4: Repairing The Break

First I checked the tip to see if it seated tightly in the but of the rod, if it does this will be the new ferrule.

Then I marked the rod where I wanted to move the guide to.

I removed the guide by cutting the whipping along the foot of the guide with a utility knife.

Then I scraped off the resin and squared the frayed end of the but for the ferrule in a miter box.

I smoothed the edges with sandpaper and tested the tip seating in the ferrule one more time before whipping.

Step 5: Whipping

Picture of Whipping
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Whipping strengthens the ferrule so the graphite doesn’t split when stressed as well as whipping is used to connect the guides and hook keep, it is done by winding strong thread around the shaft of the rod, the feet of the guides and the feet of the hook keep, then coating them with resin or clear lacquer.

This is the finished repair.

Step 6: Whipping The Ferrule

You don’t need much in the form of tools and materials just strong thread, tape, a utility knife, guides, a shaft, and clear lacquer or resin.

I used a wooden dowel to demonstrate whipping because my rod and thread were too dark to video or photograph well.

First cut a piece of thread six inches long and set it aside for later use.

Then take the but of your rod in one hand and the thread in the other and place the two together and hold the thread in place with one finger.

Wrap the thread around the shaft of the but over top of the end of the thread and continue wrapping until you have wrapped the length of the ferrule.

Then take the six inch piece of thread you put aside and make a loop.

Place the loop on the shaft and wrap the thread on top of the loop six or eight times.

Cut the whipping thread with extra length and run the end through the loop.

Grab the ends of the loop sticking out of the whipping and pull the whipping thread through the whipping. You do not need to pull all the thread through the whipping just enough so when you cut the thread the end of the thread is under the whipping and discard the scraps.

And there you have it the ferrule whipped.

Step 7: Whipping The Guide

Whipping the guide or a hook keep is the fame as whipping the ferrule with a couple additions, take a piece of tape and place it on the end of the foot of the guide and tape the guide where you want it on the shaft.

Place the thread on the opposite side of the shaft as the foot and hold it in place with your finger, make your first wrap in front of the guide strut and the rest of the wrapping behind the guide strut on top of the foot. You start and end the whipping on the opposite side of the shaft from the foot so the wrapping holds the thread tightly.

Wrap until you cover the foot completely plus a couple turns.

Then take the six inch piece of thread you put aside and make a loop.

Place the loop on the shaft and wrap the thread on top of the loop six or eight times.

Cut the whipping thread with extra length and run the end through the loop.

Grab the ends of the loop sticking out of the whipping and pull the thread through the whipping. You do not need to pull all the thread through the whipping just enough so when you cut the thread the end is under the whipping and discard the scraps.

And there you have it the guide and the ferrule whipped now all you need to do is coat the wrapping with resin or clear lacquer and your repair is complete.

Step 8: The Finished Fishing Rod

Picture of The Finished Fishing Rod
Once the lacquer is set reattach the reel put some fishing line the right poundage on the reel and you are ready to go fishing. Depending on how fast the resin or lacquer sets this repair can take as little as one hour.
JonO31 month ago
Recently broke a new fishing pole. I saw this and decided to fix it myself using brass tubing as ferrule, apoxy, .3mm steel wire for whipping, and covered with clear apoxy

Congratulations.

I hope you catch some fine fat fish on your salvaged recycled rod and reel.

Thank you so much for sharing.

rich

Josehf Murchison (author)  Ricardo Furioso10 months ago

Wait until you see the fly pole and reel I got out of the waste bin.

Send pix.
Josehf Murchison (author)  Ricardo Furioso10 months ago

It is an 81/2 foot Daiwa Swinger.

The rod is not bad the reel works but needs a lot of work.

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ChrisD111 months ago

I recently purchased a used 11 ft. carbon fiber crappie rod, upon closer inspection noticed the laquer on the ferrule is cracked down to the wrappings...how would you repair this kind of crack...would like to get it fixed before using it. Thanks! DC

Josehf Murchison (author)  ChrisD111 months ago

I would put a dab of clear nail polish on the crack sets in 5 minutes and you are ready to go.

Joe

I just fixed my first rod yesterday thanks to the information on this instructible. Got the rod and reel for 5 bucks and it retails for 90 brand new. Helps very much

Glad to have been of help.

Very nice job. Turned out great

Glad you liked it.

Joe

sephillips1 year ago

It is really hard to find someone around here who still repairs rods and reels. I am happy to see someone showing how to do it. I have several needing repair so that I can take my granddaughter fishing this summer. Thanks also for admitting that you didn't make it perfect on the first try; that gives me more hope that I can eventually get ours usable!

Josehf Murchison (author)  sephillips1 year ago

You are lucky I have no grand children to share the things I do with.

l8nite2 years ago
back in the stone ages when I was growing up, having a good fishing pole was a BIG deal and you learned how to care for and repair it but nowadays I find fishing rods and reels on the trash all the time while I'm "curb mining" unfortunately they aren't a good seller at the flea markets. I keep all the reels and any poles that are in good condition are usually given away, broken poles make great stakes in the garden. Very nicely done "ible" !
Josehf Murchison (author)  l8nite2 years ago
Funny how times change now we are a disposable society.
mvieke2 years ago
Really great instructable and especially nice pictures of the whipping process.
I'm going to keep my eyes open for "junk" reels so i can try this.

Thanks...you get my vote
Josehf Murchison (author)  mvieke2 years ago
I had to redo the whipping five times before I got photographs I could use.