Introduction: Replace Power Supply

Picture of Replace Power Supply

So i picked up this power supply and found that it did not fit my stupid dell box so i ended up doing the following.

The problem was i got one with 2 connectors not one. but even then it would not of fitted.

Step 1: Size Up Pace for Power Supply.

Picture of Size Up Pace for Power Supply.

So just hold it up to space where to put it and see what needs to be cut out.

Step 2: So Cut Out This Section and Away We Go

Picture of So Cut Out This Section and Away We Go


Cut cut cut...

Step 3: And More Cutting...

Picture of And More Cutting...

and keep on measuring up and cutting and finally we get a hole that is as follows.


and as a suggestion from TheScientist and a very good suggestion should take a file to edges so do not get cut.

Comments

lime16 (author)2012-04-19

Lo que yo hago es que desarmo el power supply origuinal y saco todo y solo le dejo los conectores y desarmo la otra power supply y la introdusco en la original y luego soldo :D

Wimzy (author)2007-11-20

Something to watch out for is that some models of Dells use a proprietary 24pin motherboard connector. If you use a normal connector it will fit physically but smoke the board when you turn it on.

bleachworthy (author)Wimzy2007-11-20

That is far from being true, not long ago, I worked in a computer repair shop, and we frequently worked on dells that had less than standard power supplies, we would do exactly this on the ones that the PSU's died in, and we NEVER had a board fry due to a standard ATX power supply. now, on the super compact systems, we would usually need to use a mini ITX power supply, but still, no problems other than they were weak, and on occasion would shut the system down if you had both the DVD drives and the hard disk spin up simultaneously. On some HP's, the power supplies have a fan connector that MUST be attatched to the board on a certain set of pins, or it will not boot. but a jumper set over the second and third pins fixes that immediately, allowing a non-proprietary PSU to be installed.

tech-king (author)bleachworthy2007-11-20

dell PSUs used to use proprietary wire colors, as opposed to the standard ones. i have pics if you need.

Thundertydus (author)tech-king2008-01-08

this may sound like spam, but is your symbol a Nvidia 680i motherboard?

tech-king (author)Thundertydus2008-01-09

no. its an aopen motherboard with VIA graphics. i has insanely good over clocking potential though.

Flea (author)bleachworthy2007-11-20

A few years ago (5+) Dell used proprietary power supplies. You had to get a Dell power supply because the wires were switched around and/or the connector was changed. It's not an issue anymore.

bleachworthy (author)Flea2007-11-20

Yeah, that was 5+ years ago, and not may people still use 7 to 800 MHZ machines anymore. you might find them in older businesses, but the average home user has upgraded by now. I don't doubt that they used to do that, it just means more cash in their pocket.

!Andrew_Modder! (author)2007-11-20

ya lol make sure you buy the right sized one! I got a 750watt gaming ATX power supply on newegg for 30$ shipped! (it has 1 120mm, and 1 90mm fan in it, and they both have blue LED's on them :-) and it works great :-).

just out of curiosity, is that unit on a 15 or 20 amp fuse? and do the lights flicker when your printer comes on??? i have a 350 and have the same probleme.

fuse- really not sure :-\. And no my lights stay on without EVER flickering (well mabe like 1ce, but i havent seen any threw my windowed case) Umm.. buy a Kill-a-watt meter, and run your computer as you would normally wile its plugged into the kill-a-watt, and if its above 300 on normal running you should get a bigger power supply. Also, if it is old it could do that. Really if its a prob, just buy a new 400 watt psu, there cheap.

no-no. im just curious because i was reading an article about people with large screens and printers and 700 watt psus constantly blowing the fuses

oh. well i have a 19inch CRT monitor (big) and a big photo printer :-)

Flea (author)!Andrew_Modder!2007-11-20

Be careful with cheap high wattage power supplies. They're not well made and use cheap components. Those things can not only die prematurely, they can take out other computer components. I hope you're not running a $400 video card on that $30 power supply. Also, a 750W doesn't always use 750W. It'll only use what's necessary to run the system. Low end systems use around 150W. Mid range uses around 200-300W. High end uses up to 400W. Extremely high end can use more than that, but for more people, buying a 750W power supply is a waste, especially a cheap 750W power supply. I like using commas :).

!Andrew_Modder! (author)Flea2007-11-20

No, its a really great power supply and its got 5/5 and 4/5 user ratings, and i have used it for almost a year without ANY prob! And my computer is a real high end pc its a 1000$ or so custom built computer, (sata, core 2 duo, sata dvd burner, ati 1650XPro 512ddr2, etc also everythings overclocked nicely) it will be its 1 year anniversary in December! :-D woot

TheScientist (author)2007-11-20

might i suggest taking a file to those edges so you don't cut yourself as regularly? otherwise good instructable :)

buffing dremel attachment :-)

GorillazMiko (author)2007-11-20

cool :-)

namit (author)GorillazMiko2007-11-20

Thanks

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